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erikals
05-19-2003, 04:34 PM
Hi,
I'm trying to make the render look less "plastic", is there any smart way to do this? I coudn't find a solution to this, I tried using "Gradient Light incidence" to make the "midtones" of the object less saturated, but it doesn't really solve the problem.

Is there any way to control the light/render so that the midtones on the object doesn't get that saturated?


Erik

Red_Oddity
05-20-2003, 04:20 AM
Give your object less color (or use a gradient which reacts to you lights incidence angle (but that would make it any less plastic)

Also, ditch the specular, or atleast tone it down a bit.

The reason it looks plastic because, well, right now it is plastic, add some diffuse roughness, bump, color differnces...

Also, asking to make something a little bit less plastic is hard to answer properluy if people don't really know what you want to achieve instead of plastic...what metal, wood, water, gas, stone, skin? what?

erikals
05-20-2003, 08:15 AM
Hi,
thanks,

Yes, the topic headline should have been a little different, my bad :)
What I'm trying to do is to make the "midtones" of the object less saturated. The area where I put the purple ring around it is the area I want to change, I want to take away the highly saturated colors in that area. By using a "Gradient Light incidence" it partly works by making the highlight areas less saturated, but not enough. Maybe I should play around with the gradient a little more.

Yup, will change the specular a little.


Best,
Erik

Elmar Moelzer
05-20-2003, 05:02 PM
I suppose this should be gold, or something?
Here are a few tipps:
Use reflection instead of specularity
Reduce the diffuse- level the same amount you add reflectivity (so i.e 60% diffuse 40% reflectivity).
Use color highlights.
Hope that helps.
CU
Elmar

Mebek
05-21-2003, 03:58 PM
If I want something to just generally look "less plastic," I'll add a slight bump map setting - something like turbulence, crumple, dented, or good ol' fractal noise and set both the scale and amplitude really small. For instance, using Dented with a value of about -5% to -10% helps things to look more like clay or ceramics (without the glaze), and I generally keep the specular low and the glossiness wide (I guess that would be the low values too). If you're trying for a more metallic / glassy look, use gradients on the diffuse/reflection(/transparency) channels' incidence angle to mimic the Fresnel effect.

erikals
07-15-2013, 05:27 PM
http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/bump.gif

10 years later... ;]

i found that it was caused by color spacing and gamut
http://www.worley.com/Media/images/html/g2/gamut_clip.html
http://www.worley.com/E/Products/g2/imgproc.html

jwiede
07-16-2013, 04:27 AM
Yep, G2 is a very useful plugin, esp. when you've got your render to 90% of what you want, and are just trying to figure out that last 10% needed. You can do many of the same per-surface tweaks, etc. with nodes, but I still find G2's often quicker to achieve desired outcome.

gerardstrada
07-21-2013, 06:08 AM
http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/bump.gif

10 years later... ;]

i found that it was caused by color spacing and gamut
http://www.worley.com/Media/images/html/g2/gamut_clip.html
http://www.worley.com/E/Products/g2/imgproc.html
:agree: Though G2 controls are not precisely gamut controls. This is more like a tone curve control with a Hue limiter. The surface processing tools do control hue and saturation but that's not precisely gamut controls neither. For really controlling gamut we need to take into account it's volume, shape and position, since these aspects affects hue and saturation differently depending on the subset of colors covered by the gamut.

The thing is that using these adjustments performed by G2 (now available through nodes) for solving oversaturation and hue twisting in shading, are really palliatives for an incorrect color workflow. Similar to what happened with several shaders in that time to overcome the incorrect tone curve as sub-product of non-linear workflows, this type of hue and saturation adjustments pretend to solve something that should be solved structurally from root: CG color flow, plausible lighting and physical shaders.



Gerardo

erikals
07-21-2013, 07:08 AM
i had a feeling it could be something like that... http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif
yeah, i haven't noticed the problem when using the new linear workflow.

i'm a bit smarter now, saving this post for future reference. thanks again for the explanation :king:

gerardstrada
07-21-2013, 05:22 PM
i had a feeling it could be something like that... http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif
yeah, i haven't noticed the problem when using the new linear workflow.

i'm a bit smarter now, saving this post for future reference. thanks again for the explanation :king:
But your deduction that this is a gamut issue too is indeed certain! there's still some problems that the linear workflow alone can not solve. Those are solved by a scene-referred workflow, which is still overlooked in 3D packages. Let's hope they begin to address more proper tools for this kind of workflows soon http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif



Gerardo