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ivanjs
02-16-2003, 02:30 AM
Working on a futuristic tank. Haven't done any weathering yet, just applied a couple of procedurals to break up the monotony of desert tan. Take a look at:

http://homepage.mac.com/johnselvia/PhotoAlbum5.html

Thanks!
John
http://www.dnaco.net/~ivanjs/

oxyg3n
02-16-2003, 02:34 AM
I like your work so far. Are the window going to be transparent at all?

Also, can you share with me a few wireframes?

Keep it up!

feckit
02-16-2003, 04:05 AM
You don't normally see a tank with windows) It's looks pretty cool with the darkened windows though. Post another pic when you've finished the texturing.

Simon
02-16-2003, 06:25 AM
That's good modelling ivanjs, how long has it taken you so far?? I'm a big detail fan and you've certainly got plenty of detail going on there. Those little things sticking out from the side panels look like they might snap off easily if the tank came into contact with anything though ;)

Epita
02-16-2003, 09:24 AM
tanks never have windows because of protection. still its a really good tank even if it would never get off the drawing board.

lone
02-16-2003, 11:05 AM
that is killer. i second the detail comment - impressive.

ivanjs
02-16-2003, 11:12 AM
The window idea came from my obsession with Mechwarrior and how all the Mechs have cockpit glass (didn't make sense to me, until a Mech fan told me that new glass physics had been discovered in the 30th century. I was also inspired by Gerry Anderson's UFO SHADO Mobiles, which have lots of glass on the driver's end at least.

I figured by that time in the future, there must be some kind of super glass that could withstand
direct hits or something. Thanks for the comments!!!

John

cathuria
02-16-2003, 09:05 PM
I love the concept -- and the detail is outstanding, really helps sell it. Perhaps more of a Mobile Weapons Platform than battle tank (then folk might not balk at the windows so much).

This thing deserves a good radiosity beauty render -- great job!

ivanjs
02-16-2003, 09:10 PM
Don't do much radiosity render. Why would this improve the render, isn't that best suited for reflective stuff?

Just curious. Willing to try anything to improve it.
Thanks for the comments.
John

cathuria
02-16-2003, 10:34 PM
Radiosity is great for showing off the detail of a model like this, because the lighting reveals all the nooks and crannies.

For a simple effect, load the model into an empty scene and change the background color to a light gray or white. Turn your main light off (0%) or way down, and use Backdrop Only radiosity at the default settings. This keeps the render time from exploding too much and still makes a cool looking pic. (Start with a shrunken thumbnail render so you can see how much illumination you're getting, once you've adjusted the brightness of the background to what you want, render a full size image.)

For a more detailed & realistic radiosity render I like to use a Skydome. Start with a flat plane with the default surface, then make a dome over it using half of a large tesselated sphere -- flip the poly's so they face inward and make them 100% luminous & 0 diffuse. In the scene, place your model in the middle of the dome on the groundplane; turn off the light and do small test renders with interpolated radiosity (using a tolerance of 0.3 makes for an ugly but fast render) until you get the level of illumination you want. Then change to Monte Carlo at about 4x12 and do a full size render -- best to do that one when you're about to go to bed -- or away for the weekend.

Other folks will have other favorite settings, and there are more tricks to using radiosity. Personally, I love to use it on unsurfaced models for a beauty shot -- it really shows off the structure. I've even used the technique professionally for architecture models -- looks really cool :D

Forgive me if I've bored you with stuff you already know -- I must be in blabby mood tonight...

MorituriMax
02-17-2003, 02:45 AM
I like the windows..

If I remember, some Canadian? Jet fighters have a cockpit painted on the underside of the aircraft so that enemy fighters could get confused trying to figure out the orientation from a distance.. perhaps this is something similar.. draw fire to the most heavily armored section.. sure after awhile, the bad guys might get wise, but there is always the small distraction moment while the bad guy goes, "No don't shoot that anymore."