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jbrunswick
11-22-2005, 01:41 PM
I'm new to Lightwave, and I was wondering what I had to do to get sharper renderings. I use the default settings, but when I save the rendering, it is very pixelated around the edges - is there a quick fix, or does this take a lot of time to correct?

Thanks

hrgiger
11-22-2005, 01:52 PM
You need to use AA.

Oh, rtfm too.

Captain Obvious
11-22-2005, 02:31 PM
You need to use AA.

Oh, rtfm too.
:i_agree: .

MonroePoteet
11-22-2005, 05:21 PM
It's called "anti-aliasing" and is enabled in the Camera panel. It removes the stair stepping from the edges of your generated images.

mTp

P.S.: HRGiger and Capt. Obvious: total elapsed time 28 seconds by stopwatch to type in a COURTEOUS response to a new user. I'm sorry your lives are so busy that you can't afford 28 seconds for one of our new associates.

hrgiger
11-23-2005, 06:06 AM
I gave him the answer. I just didn't put it in such "encyclopedic" fashion.

I'm fine with answering questions, and if you search my 4,000+ posts, you'll find I've been fairly helpful with a few thousand of them. But don't ask why your render is jagged. The coverage of AA and what it is and how to apply it is fairly extensive in the documentation. I know some people just like to jump into a program without first reading the docs, but a quick look under rendering would have revealed the answer.

Yes, we're here to guide newer users and share pitfalls, but we're not here to provide someone a full ride education. If you wish to cater to that, dont' crit me because I don't. I have better things to do with my 28 seconds.

krimpr
11-23-2005, 08:45 AM
jbrunswick: join date November 2005 Number of posts: 1.

I remember how I felt when I got my first RTFM; actually I didn't even know what it meant until someone explained it to me and gave me the chapter in the FM where I could find the answer to my problem. His subtle direction was alot classier than the RTFM I got for a first reply. Welcome to the forum, jbrunswick.

MonroePoteet
11-27-2005, 05:18 PM
hrgiger: yes, I've definitely benefited from your responses in the past, as have many others. But, if you're thinking of replying "RTFM" to another new user, please just leave it unanswered. If it sits for a while with zero responses, someone who's a little less expert than you will get around to it, or he'll figure it out on his own. I, personally, consider RTFM to be an abominable response in a General Support forum.

Also, "anti-aliasing" is a fairly esoteric term. For newbies, sometimes just having the correct term ("anti-aliasing", not "AA") can be a world of help.

And thanks for all the great help in the past.

mTp

UnCommonGrafx
11-27-2005, 05:56 PM
It's balderdash to say that rtfms aren't valid answers to some of these posts. Teach them how to find answers is MUCH better than spoon feeding them. Comparing your response times, for not much of an answer by the way, is not helpful to them or you.

The manual comes with some hints to these things; a quality search of the archives gets you farther; and a statement that you've done both of these things gets one a much more succinct answer to get one renderig quality images.

RTM or RTFM is ALWAYS a valid response to such questions. Telling others not to do it is over-reaching one's authority.
___________________________________
jbrunswick,
It will take longer render times than you've had to get good images. Try changing settings in the camera panel. Have a read on these settings as they will assist you in smoother images. Cryptic it may be, but the manual, bound or online, will assist you greatly in this area.

AbnRanger
11-27-2005, 05:59 PM
It's the equivalent of telling someone new to your town, who asks for directions..."Hey, stop and get a F---ing :devil: map, why don't you?!"
Or yelling at an infant (for crying)..."Hey, there's milk in the fridge...you want some, go get it your F---ing :devil: self!" :thumbsdow

That might be a valid answer for Donald Trump or Archie Bunker, but it's downright rude nonetheless. Have you ever heard of the term, "TACT?"

If a friend of yours has bad breath...telling them to "Step away from your Grill!" :stop: may be a VALID answer, but simply offering them a stick of gum is is a much better way to go about it.

UnCommonGrafx
11-27-2005, 06:23 PM
As a former teacher, nah, tellin' someone their breath stinks is an easy thing to do. No pillows needed to soften the blow.

"Tact" is something that I practice everyday, face to face, with people in the world. Trying to get someone to learn an intricate 3d program because that's the field they want to go into is not something 'tact' will be good for. No supervisor will practice 'tact' with you at that juncture.

AbnRanger, how many kids do you have, sir/ma'am? I have four, three of whom are out of the house; one is in the American Armed Forces. Your example is rather poor for a straw man example. If you are calling people infants asking for info, then you have portrayed them in a much more rude light than I.

No real man asks for directions :D so I'm not clear on that example. I have a gps for directions and presume most that don't navigate well, or travel extensively, do also.


So, telling someone to read the manual is a bad thing, nowadays huh? I find that a sad statement.

hrgiger
11-27-2005, 06:36 PM
I keep forgetting that some people have skin the thickness of paper mache and need everything they hear sugar coated so as not to offend their delicate sensibilities.

To me, answering every simple question that is such a commom feature as AA is, is like giving a dollar to a homeless man. It helps them out that very moment but does nothing to better their lives in the long run. Everyone needs help from time to time but people need to learn to be self-reliant eventually. I told him the answer he was looking for and then I told him where he could find more in-depth help. I'm sorry I left the sugar coating off and it wasn't sweet enough for everyone.

Perhaps we need a section of the forum dedicated to those who have no interest in reading the manual to ask questions that are easily found. Kid gloves definately required.

AbnRanger
11-27-2005, 06:40 PM
As a former teacher, nah, tellin' someone their breath stinks is an easy thing to do. No pillows needed to soften the blow.

"Tact" is something that I practice everyday, face to face, with people in the world. Trying to get someone to learn an intricate 3d program because that's the field they want to go into is not something 'tact' will be good for. No supervisor will practice 'tact' with you at that juncture.

AbnRanger, how many kids do you have, sir/ma'am? I have four, three of whom are out of the house; one is in the American Armed Forces. Your example is rather poor for a straw man example. If you are calling people infants asking for info, then you have portrayed them in a much more rude light than I.

No real man asks for directions :D so I'm not clear on that example. I have a gps for directions and presume most that don't navigate well, or travel extensively, do also.


So, telling someone to read the manual is a bad thing, nowadays huh? I find that a sad statement.
Yes sir, Mr. Trump...you sure showed me. OK everybody...scratch that. No polite responses here; Mr. Trump dictates that we are to resort to being hard a$$es from now on! Got it?! :devil: Good. Now, get back to work!
As for you Animation students out there; don't even think about asking your instructor questions in class...just suck it up, and go read your F--ing Manual.

For the love of Peter, Paul, and Mary...you guys KEEP missing the point. We are not talking to someone who's been around 3D for years...but someone new, and therefore...YES YOU CAN....tell someone to read the manual. But seeing that they are new, why not show a little class (just a smidge...not even a dollar's worth) ...and politely tell them the first and best resource is always the (F---ING) Manual.

UnCommonGrafx
11-27-2005, 06:59 PM
I'm not sorry but what are you trying to sell here?

New means need to read the manual. Old means having read the manual and still not sure.


You gotta question or just out to protect? You do understand that he has had the question answered. Do you also understand that YOU haven't offered him ANYTHING, that you've only commented in a way that is to control OUR responses?

You, sir, seemed to be on a control binge more than a helpful one. What do you say to HIS original question:

I use the default settings, but when I save the rendering, it is very pixelated around the edges - is there a quick fix, or does this take a lot of time to correct?

Help HIM out without trying to control others. Much more constructive.


Yes sir, Mr. Trump...you sure showed me. OK everybody...scratch that. No polite responses here; Mr. Trump dictates that we are resort to being hard a$$es from now on! Got it?! :devil: Good. Now, get back to work!

for the love of Peter, Paul, and Mary...you guys KEEP missing the point. We are not talking to someone who's been around 3D for years...but someone new, and therefore...YES YOU CAN....tell someone to read the manual. But seeing that they are new, you can politely tell them the first and best resource is always the (F---ING) Manual.

loki74
11-27-2005, 07:12 PM
So, telling someone to read the manual is a bad thing, nowadays huh? I find that a sad statement.

Well, I think its a matter of:

"Seriously... antialiasing is not only common knowledge but extensively covered in the manual. You should check there before starting a thread here." != "RTFM."

I know its easier to type, but come on now... I mean, even if someone asks something stupid, do we really need to make them feel stupid for it? Especially if they are a newcomer and may not be familiar with everything you are.

$0.02

EDIT:

and no, its not a matter of having thin skin. It's about having class. I (and pretty much anyone I'd imagine) can handle someone being an @sshat over the internet.. I mean come on it's text on a screen. But that doesn't mean that we should all be @sshats just because we can all probably handle it.

UnCommonGrafx
11-27-2005, 07:20 PM
Read what's been said. Are you saying that the question wasn't or hasn't been answered?









So far, everyone has jumped in to say HOW to answer but not offered the answer. Most of the "Be polite" people have only chastised not answered. Answer his question as this would be the way for the 'rude' to see how it's done. Someone told me rtfm when I joined the forum and I have been thankful to them ever since.


Surely there are better things to protct than those in need of a good read...

loki74
11-27-2005, 07:29 PM
Read what's been said. Are you saying that the question wasn't or hasn't been answered?


Read what I said. Did I say the question wasn't answered?

Of course the question has been answered, and there is nothing one can do to amend it at this point


Answer his question as this would be the way for the 'rude' to see how it's done.

Read what I said yet again:

"Seriously... antialiasing is not only common knowledge but extensively covered in the manual. You should check there before starting a thread here." != "RTFM."

He should have looked in the FM and read up. He was foolish not to. But there is a mature, civilized way of saying this.

AbnRanger
11-27-2005, 07:35 PM
So...for the record...you are telling me that, as a former teacher yourself, you would tell a student on the first day of class to "GO READ YOUR F%@#ING TEXTBOOK" if they raised their hand to ask a question?

What's REALLY sad is that someone who is a regular on this forum has to be reminded to show some F%@#ING manners.

Look, Uncommon....I shouldn't have gotten so sarcastic, I admit. However, this has been a very friendly and POLITE forum....and it's up to you, me, and the rest to show a moderate level of courtesy... in order to keep it that way.

RTFM....the "F" doesn't stand for "Fun" or "Friendly," but rather a slang word. THAT is totally uncalled for when addressing a brand new LW user. You and HR Rigger both know that. You shouldn't have to be reminded. We aren't trying to drive people away, but to help BUILD the LW community. Let's not make any further issue of this, and just drop it, why don't we.

UnCommonGrafx
11-27-2005, 07:56 PM
Actually, leave off the expletives and yes, you would get a portion of the first days lecture.

What's sad is that I've continued on this conversation for so long. But, as I'm in an onery mood and you guys are so easy, I keep it up...

Manners were tossed when others started their commanding ways, telling other members how to respond. The starter of this thread hasn't responded... mayhaps he's reading the manual as suggested. Mayhaps he found this info invaluable as he wasn't sure what to look for nor where to look.

The rudeness you guys portray here have only been compounded by your polly anna attempts to get everyone to behave in you perceived civil way.

17 messages. 14 or so telling others how to answer questions; 3 on the question. Please don't bother telling me how to respond to questions if you can't also add to the pool of knowledge. Telling ME how to be POLITE is not in any of your job descriptions. So please, don't waste your efforts.


jbrunswick, welcome to the forum. Search the archives as there is an invaluable amount of information. For all that offer rtfm as an answer, ask them which chapter: they'll probably already have it ready on their computer, hoping you will ask. Don't be put off by this answer as it is one everyone gets when their question is just as easily answered by a read of the manual. NewTek has an amazing forum full of GREAT information -- do have a read through the archives to harness some of the information shared. Plus, be sure to have a go at their tutorials:
written tutes -- http://www.newtek.com/lightwave/tutorials/index.php or
video tutes -- http://www.newtek.com/lightwave/tutorials/videos/index.php

We are very much like family here and the bickering you see is nothing more than philisophical differences. When it's time, be sure to go to NAB or SIGGRAPH to meet some of us rudies in person. I got a pic with Dick Van Dyke one year at NAB. ;)