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enzo80
11-17-2005, 08:29 PM
I hope one day i can create more Realastic look :D

SplineGod
11-17-2005, 08:31 PM
Thats not too bad. :) Some of the modeling needs to be tightened up a bit. The under armour usually has a ropy appearance. The texturing isnt too bad so far either. The lighting definately needs some work. Nice job! :)

enzo80
11-17-2005, 09:53 PM
Thats not too bad. :) Some of the modeling needs to be tightened up a bit. The under armour usually has a ropy appearance. The texturing isnt too bad so far either. The lighting definately needs some work. Nice job! :)


i couldn't make my 3D model look 100% like the reference anime pic that i had, i still lack some modeling skills, and i am just learning about texturing didnt start with lightning yet, all what i know is how to use point to point modeling with sub-patch mode lol, i dont know how can i improve myself and reach the level where i can model anything i see in real life 100% as a 3D model.

i appreciate any advices :help: :help:

SplineGod
11-17-2005, 10:33 PM
Point by point is one way to model. I typically avoid using that method as a general way of modeling. I generally do any P by P on smaller areas to adjust details. Normall Ill either rough out the shape with splines or start wtih a primitive and build from there. I find it too easy to get too much detail in areas or paint myself into a corner plus there are much faster ways to create models. :)
Can you post examples of the reference you used?

Heres an example:
I created this helmet by laying out simple splines first. The geometry needed to flow in a particular way to get the ridges to go the right way. Its all seamless except for the rivots around the eyes and the welds.
http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/personal/rhelmet_render4.jpg
http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/examples/helmet.gif

Silkrooster
11-17-2005, 10:54 PM
Larry,
I like the helmet. Nice touch with the weld pattern. One thing I noticed though is the top center of the helmet it looks like the weld is not touching both objects.
I know you only showed the helmet for an example, but I couldn't help myself, I am starting to think like a lightwaver :D :devil:
Silk

SplineGod
11-17-2005, 10:58 PM
Thanks! :)
Its possible it might not be. Adding the welds were done using HVs as a test. :)

enzo80
11-18-2005, 04:46 AM
Point by point is one way to model. I typically avoid using that method as a general way of modeling. I generally do any P by P on smaller areas to adjust details. Normall Ill either rough out the shape with splines or start wtih a primitive and build from there. I find it too easy to get too much detail in areas or paint myself into a corner plus there are much faster ways to create models. :)
Can you post examples of the reference you used?

Heres an example:
I created this helmet by laying out simple splines first. The geometry needed to flow in a particular way to get the ridges to go the right way. Its all seamless except for the rivots around the eyes and the welds.
http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/personal/rhelmet_render4.jpg
http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/examples/helmet.gif





here are the references, i never tried polygon modeling because Dan Ablan said in his book detail out is best way to get most detail in your model, so i model each part seperatly. try to model the head your wayi bet you can make it 100 % look like it in 3d :bday:

SplineGod
11-18-2005, 06:03 PM
I think youve done a very good job regardless of the method.
Ive taught character modeling for many years and in that time you notice which methods are easist to learn. Ive also done character modeling for a living out in Hollywood for years and as a video game artist and freelance artist for years before that as well. The easiest method to learn is one that follows a more traditional approach which is to start the the basic overall shape first,then refine it and add the details last. This is the method youll find in any decent drawing or sculpting book. Most good drawing or sculpting books have you start with a basic shape. When drawing you start with an oval and then add in the ceneterline, the eyeline, noseline, mouthline etc. This lays out the proportions which is the foundation for where everything goes.
You never see those books start with drawing or sculpting a detailed eye and slowly working over to another detailed eye and so on. A very experienced artist could pull it off because they already know where theyre going in advance. Stuart Aitken wrote that tutorial in Dans book and is a very experienced character artist. An experienced artist can skip many of the more basic steps and dive right in. When youre learning its better to follow a more traditional approach IMO. Its been taught that way for centuries for a reason. :)
Theres a couple of problems that always seems to pop up when point by point modeling which is that the detail you may need for one part of an object isnt the same amount of detail you need elsewhere. You get so many points that it makes it more difficult to get a nice smooth model and so they tend to have a lumpy appearance. Using less geometry makes it easier to get a smooth mesh. Its also more difficult to geta good flow using the point by point method. Good flow helps with getting correct details, texturing and deformations when animating.
Heres a couple of examples of starting with a single poly and modeling using the traditional appreach of detailing in rather then out.
In the first image I started with a single poly and roughed out the basic form and flow for the face. The 2nd image is more refined and more of the head is added in towards the sides and back. The 3rd shows the basic completed head. The overall form and flow are achieved. The last head shows the nearly completed model. The details are created locally off the basic flow I had set forth early on. This follows very easy, repeatable steps. Even the detailed head doesnt have a huge amount of polys. The resulting mesh is smooth with an nice overall even poly density. I can still detail more from here if need be. Total modeling time was around 3.5 - 4 hrs.

http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/examples/gollum_process.jpg
Heres the nearly completed head.
http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/personal/gollum.jpg

enzo80
11-18-2005, 08:47 PM
can you tell me which tools are best to use for modeling in LW :help: and thanks for all points you stated out there they are very valuable information

SplineGod
11-18-2005, 09:32 PM
Ive found that when organic modeling you really need only a handful of tools.
The basic ones work the best such as:
Knife, Bandsaw, bevel, multishift, extender and spinquads.
I also use point normal move and a few other tools from time to time.

The other tool I use alot when modeling characters are splines.
Splines use much less data and cover less of the screen when modeling over reference images. I can see the form and flow much like a 3D Sketch. I can come up with a base form and flow very quickly. I also get very nice smoothly flowing polys. Heres an example of the spline cage and the the low rez mesh that results. You can see that the form and flow are nice and smooth. The polygon density is pretty even. Because of the flow it makes it easy to detail.
The spline cages are very simple but allow me to easily and quickly lay out the polygons. I typically dont use splines for detailing but just to layout the basic polys and flow as I said before. There are much better tools for detailing with. :)
Heres the spline cage for the head:
http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/personal/merc_head_splines.jpg

Heres the splines for the torso:
http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/personal/merc_torso_splines.jpg

Heres the result:
http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/personal/merc_torso.jpg
http://www.3dtrainingonline.com/personal/merc_torso_side.jpg