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View Full Version : p3 1ghz to dual p3 1 ghz - is it really worth it?



tomerggg
05-05-2003, 11:30 AM
hi people,

i am working with a p3 1ghz processor on ASUS cusl2-c motherboard with 192 mb sdram...
now, i have a one time chance to buy used dual p3 1ghz motherboard and processors with 512 sdram...
i am working with windows XP pro...
will it affect my computer preformance dramaticly or only by reduced rendering time? does modeler will be affected from that? how about windows xp preformance? do i need do download patches for lightwave to support dual pro' ?

plz tell me any furthor information about dual system...

thanks,
Tomer

mattclary
05-05-2003, 11:34 AM
It will render faster than a single CPU. The real question is, "Is it worth the money"? If it's a good deal, take it. Doubt it will render much faster than a single 2ghz cpu, so use that as a comparison. Certainly don't pay more than you would for a P4 2.4 mobo and processor.

Check out http://www.bomis.com for benchmarks for an accurate comparison.

Elmar Moelzer
05-05-2003, 05:15 PM
Go for a P4 instead!
LW is well optimized for P4s SSE2
P4 2.0 Ghz here is more than 30% faster than my dual P3 1 Ghz in most scenes. In some I have seen improvement by even up to 50% and that with only 512 MB DDR in the P4 versus 1GB in the Dual P3.
CU
Elmar

tomerggg
05-05-2003, 06:30 PM
but upgrading to p4 will reduce the overall preformance!! that might seem crazy, but from my experiences with p4 systems, p4 might be faster in lightwave renders and stuff - but it definetly "slower" in most commonly used operations (windows, games, handling number of programs at a time....)....
i will be very happy to here your opinions about that....

Tomer

Elmar Moelzer
05-06-2003, 12:37 AM
Hello Tomer
Most commonly used applications are not multithreaded so they will make little use your second CPU. Trust me, I have had quite a few Dual- systems in the past.
CU
Elmar

testu_nagouchi
05-12-2003, 09:55 AM
I've got a dual PIII 1ghz system and I wouldn't trade it for anything. Dual systems are GREAT. the greatest thing in the world is being able to work in photoshop, whatever, while rendering. (i just change the "affinity" of ligthwave from both CPU's to one temporarily.).

Once you go dual you won't want to go back.
:D

mattclary
05-12-2003, 10:02 AM
Man, I am SUCH a BONEHEAD!!!

I meant, http://www.blanos.com

Man, what a dumba**.... :rolleyes:

phyc249
05-12-2003, 07:57 PM
what about the latest celerons 2.4 GHz.

is it worth paying twice the price for a P4?

mattclary
05-13-2003, 07:49 AM
Stay away from a Celeron, you'e better off buying a cheaper P4.

Lynx3d
05-14-2003, 01:07 PM
Yea definitely no (P4 based) Celeron

I'd go with a single P4 too btw, however, as renderslave a Dual P3 is pretty nice...

I understand the argument that you can continue working when only rendering with one CPU etc, BUT, a >2GHz P4 (or Athlon with comparable rating) will definitely handle larger polycounts in viewports etc much better than the dual P3.
I'm using a dual Athlon 1800+ currently, but the first weeks worked with one CPU (cuz one was dead on arrival...*grr*) and it really doesn't make a noticeable difference for modeling/animating.

Most other programs aren't really good multithreaded either, like Photoshop or other rendering tools (often even plugins) you may use.

tomerggg
05-15-2003, 10:36 AM
finnaly i got the answer... dual processors system is good only for rendering...
i spoke with few traders and chose this sytem:
Intel Pentium 4 2.4GB 533Mhz >>> $165
256MB 333MHZ Micron >>> $57
i haven't decided on motherboard yet....
in money to preformance ratio, is it worth it?

thanks,
Tomer

phyc249
05-17-2003, 05:34 AM
tomerggg

I am looking at virtually the same system and as far as motherboards I am leaning toward the Abit IC7. I have been reading some really good reviews on it.

I am definately looking at the Intel 875P chipset. it allows duel chanel DDR ram built in raid and lots of other goodies.

the Abit board is the most reasonably priced board I have found with this chipset.

good luck.

mattclary
05-19-2003, 09:24 AM
phyc249, can you post a link to reviews of that board? Been eyeballing it myself, but haven't found any reviews yet. Thanks!

Lynx3d
05-19-2003, 09:48 AM
Ever heard of Google? ;)
like
http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/reviews/motherboards/ABIT_IC7-G_1.html
and
http://www.hardocp.com/article.html?art=NDY5

Seems to be a great board

Anandtech liked the MSI 875P Neo-FIS2R very much:
http://www.anandtech.com/mb/showdoc.html?i=1820

mattclary
05-19-2003, 11:06 AM
Dude, I LIVE on Google, just hadn't gotten that far yet. ;) Anandtech is the first place I stop for these things...

VWTornado
05-19-2003, 02:59 PM
What do you guys think about Asus motherboards? Like this one specifically: http://www.comp-u-plus.com/insidepage.php3?id=1000833&sid=5s4586132nj6uik

I'm looking at upgrading and wanted to build one myself but there are so many different motherboards and RAM and stuff I have no idea what to get. I want a P4 2.4Ghz and 1.5Gigs of DDR RAM (PC2100 is probably fine). What motherboard and RAM would you recommend? (I dont want to spend my retirement on the parts...so don't go getting all expensive and crazy on what you recommend ;))

Thanks

Here's a link to the case I was looking at also (400w power supply with 2 case fans):

http://www.comp-u-plus.com/insidepage.php3?id=941002&sid=5s4586132nj6uik

And the P4 I was looking at:

http://www.comp-u-plus.com/insidepage.php3?id=815&sid=5s4586132nj6uik

And I was looking at Crucial Technologies for the memory. (1.5 Gigs) http://www.crucial.com/store/partredirector.asp?model=P4C800+Deluxe&partno=CT6464Z40B&ipartno=CT6464Z40B

Lynx3d
05-19-2003, 04:08 PM
I'd really watch out for a P4 2.4C (or 2.6C...3.0C), FSB800 and much more important, Hyper-Threading should make a difference when working with many tasks (like encoding while working etc.)
But for rendering in Lightwave it doesn't really make a difference.

Asus...their support in germany has not the best reputation to say it kindly, so hope you'll never need it :)
Apart from that their products tend to be a bit more expensive than other comparable products...
But it may be different elsewhere.

mattclary
05-20-2003, 06:18 AM
VWTornando, when getting your memory, keep in mind that you should buy it in pairs since the motherboard you have picked uses the 875 chipset. This chipset uses dual channel memory. If you get 1.5gb of memory, you need to get 2 512mb dimms and 2 256mb dimms. I have decided to go with the "C" processors, if for nothing else than the 800mhz bus. Been figuring I'll get the 2.8ghz, but my wife said, "Just spend the extra $200 and get the 3ghz". God I love her. :cool:

Lynx3d
05-20-2003, 01:48 PM
*lol*
just why don't i believe the last two sentences? :)

VWTornado
05-20-2003, 02:17 PM
Originally posted by mattclary
VWTornando, when getting your memory, keep in mind that you should buy it in pairs since the motherboard you have picked uses the 875 chipset. This chipset uses dual channel memory. If you get 1.5gb of memory, you need to get 2 512mb dimms and 2 256mb dimms. I have decided to go with the "C" processors, if for nothing else than the 800mhz bus.

See...where does it say that? I'm sure you are right, but nothing tells me that...so I would have been screwed, cause I was gonna order 3 512 MB DIMMS. I found another Asus MB that supports 4 DIMMs, instead of 3. I guess I'll just get 2 Gigs of RAM instead of 1.5. ;) :D

Heres the motherboard I was looking at now: http://usa.asus.com/products/mb/socket478/p4c800-d/overview.htm

What do you think? And can I put 4 PC3200 DIMMS in that motherboard?

Thanks for the info so far! And I'm still just looking at a P4 2.4Ghz with the 533Mhz Bus.

Lynx3d
05-20-2003, 03:26 PM
Well what did you think how that dual channel/doubling memory bandwith works? :)
simply put 2 64bit modules get used as if they were one 128bit.

Well SiS' 655 chipset apparently does work with 3 modules in dual channel mode too, it has different modes and stuff...ah damn forgot were the review was that explained that...

anyway, we're talking about i875P and it has following rules (copied from AnandTech article):
- DIMMs must be installed in pairs
- Each DIMM in a pair must be the same size (e.g. 128MB, 256MB, etc…)
- Each DIMM must use the same density memory chips (e.g. 128Mb, 256Mb chips, etc…)
- Each DIMM use the same DRAM bus width (x8 or x16)
- Each DIMM must be either single-sided or dual-sided, you cannot mix a single and a dual sided DIMM in a pair

In other words, use an even number of identical modules unless you want trouble :)

VWTornado
05-20-2003, 10:05 PM
Thanks for the detailed explanation. I'm not too knowledgable about building PCs. I have installed simple stuff like RAM, video cards, sound cards, etc...and installed and reinstalled the OS a few times. I'm new to building a PC from scratch.

I was looking at another Asus mobo. Its a P4X800 Deluxe. Has 4 DIMM slots instead of just 3. So I could do 2 gigs of RAM and pair 4 512 MB modules. Any thoughts on that motherboard?

mattclary
05-21-2003, 07:48 AM
If you go with the Asus, order it with the cpu installed for you. See that big silver heatsink on the board? I read (at Anandtech, I think) that it gets in the way when installing the cpu heatsink. They had to use a screwdriver to get it on. That was a deal breaker for me. I'll go with Abit or Gigabyte, probably.

VWTornado
05-21-2003, 02:07 PM
Maybe I'll just suck it up and get the Gigabyte MB. I found one with 6 DIMM slots on it. :eek: Thats what I'm talking about. :D But its $270. :(