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BlackOpsBen
09-22-2005, 08:02 PM
This was actually the second thing I ever made in Lightwave, but I've touched it up recently.
http://www.geocities.com/[email protected]/Spyder_Apart.jpg
http://www.geocities.com/[email protected]/Spyder_Hopper.jpg

fazrul_X2N
09-23-2005, 04:46 AM
very cool. :thumbsup:

BlackOpsBen
09-23-2005, 08:29 AM
Thank you!

kml12
09-23-2005, 08:49 AM
Man,

It'a been a while since I went paintballing. Nothing like shooting your best friends, and strangers too :hey:

Lottmedia
09-23-2005, 04:13 PM
Is it cell shaded? The black metal areas of the gun look cell shaded or something. Wierd



J-Rod

BlackOpsBen
09-23-2005, 04:17 PM
No its not cell shaded, it's just all of the reflection, refraction, etc. I know it does look kinda weird. It might look a bit more real if I had an environment for it so it would reflect the outdoors or maybe a person next to it, you know, something like that.

Stooch
10-11-2005, 03:12 PM
if thats meant to be photorealistic then it needs more work. the metal needs to be adjusted for specularity, proper diffuse settings, some fresnel, maybe anisotropy for the barrel. and some blurred reflections with softer shadows...

lardbros
10-17-2005, 06:46 AM
Do you get the fresnel effect with metals?? Thought it was just transparent reflective materials?!

I like your model alot, the only crit being that the Sub-division/poly level could be increased on a few curved areas.

I reckon the metal would be spot on if there was an environment to reflect. Maybe a touch of anisotropy too :thumbsup:

Stooch
10-17-2005, 11:22 PM
yes, fresnel is seen in alot of things. its merely incidence angle based reflection. transparency is affected because at acute angles the the reflection covers up the transparency. however since the metal is not transparent all you are seeing is reflection. oh yeah metals tend to have blurred reflections unless they are highly polished.

read, learn and love this website:

http://www.the-worms-of-art.com/tutorials/lightwavetutes_221.html#

lardbros
10-18-2005, 03:44 AM
That's what i said, "only in reflective, transparent materials"! As this is metal there would be no fresnel effect! It's just you said fresnel on the metal... i thought anyway.

Maybe on the seethrough plastic bit near the hopper there should be some fresnel? But otherwise none.

Captain Obvious
10-18-2005, 03:53 AM
Fresnel effects occur on just about every specular material. It's usually most apparent on transparent materials, though. However, you must remember that quite a few specular materials are actually covered in a very thin layer of a very transparent material. Specular wood is covered in transparent and specular varnish, for example, making the wood appear shinier than it "really" is. As the incidence angle approaches 90, the transparency decreases and the specular reflectivty increases. However, for the most part, you do not need to actually model and texture these separately.

Stooch
10-18-2005, 08:27 AM
That's what i said, "only in reflective, transparent materials"! As this is metal there would be no fresnel effect! It's just you said fresnel on the metal... i thought anyway.

Maybe on the seethrough plastic bit near the hopper there should be some fresnel? But otherwise none.

obviously you didnt follow the link i gave. i highly suggest you do so before you keep arguing.. read the mr fresnel tutorial.

Fresnel is directly related to conductivity, less conductive - more pronounced effect. less conductive, makes it more subtle. transparency has nothing to do with it. it merely allows you to notice the effect most obviously.

Mebek
10-18-2005, 10:06 AM
Any reflective surface shows the fresnel effect, metal included. Fresnel effect is reflection and transparency, so if either is apparent on a surface, it will show. Remember that "reflection" in 3D is actually three surface properties - Reflection, Diffuse, and Specularity, so all three channels are affected by Fresnel.

lardbros
10-18-2005, 11:20 AM
obviously you didnt follow the link i gave. i highly suggest you do so before you keep arguing.. read the mr fresnel tutorial.

Fresnel is directly related to conductivity, less conductive - more pronounced effect. less conductive, makes it more subtle. transparency has nothing to do with it. it merely allows you to notice the effect most obviously.

Hang on a sec, i hope you didn't think i was trying to start an argument?!? I'm clearly wrong, and i can admit that... cheers for the link anyway!

Back onto the model i reckon.