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kiwi dave
09-20-2005, 07:06 PM
Has anyone ever done any digital embroidery? More specifically embroidered type on a towel.

I have to try and do this and was wondering if anyone has any handy hints.

Thanks very much

Dave

Silkrooster
09-20-2005, 07:43 PM
This is just a thought, as I have never tried it. But what if you placed the text over the cloth, then selected every other point matching the oposite side of the letter. Pulled that down into the cloth, then used point normal move to fatten the text. This would probably look better sub patched.
Anyways, just an idea. Good luck
Silk

Surrealist.
09-20-2005, 10:35 PM
I was wondering how much text you have to do. Silk's idea sounds interesting. I had been wanting to watch this video again so this gave me inspiration to do so. Just something that might give you some ideas. There are a few cool tricks.

Good luck.

ftp://ftp.newtek.com/pub/LightWave/Tutorials/Vidz/braids.mov

Silkrooster
09-20-2005, 10:52 PM
LOL, I almost forgot about that video already. If I remember right, that was the tutorial that introduced me to the point normal move tool.
Silk

MonroePoteet
09-21-2005, 11:00 AM
You might also try slicing up the letters, either with Julienne or with Drill=>Slice and an array of skinny boxes in the background aligned to the thread direction. Once sliced, apply a tiny little bevel to simulate the threads, and give it a nice thread texture.

Here's an example.

mTp

P.S. Although the tiny bevel produces some "wild" points, I just drag them back into the letters. The embroidered letters may not be perfect in real life.

Silkrooster
09-21-2005, 06:14 PM
Your example of text reminds me of corduroy cloth. Anyways, I always thought the embroidery is horizontal not vertical. But I suppose it could be either. Vertically should be less work(assuming).
Silk

Surrealist.
09-21-2005, 06:44 PM
LOL, I almost forgot about that video already. If I remember right, that was the tutorial that introduced me to the point normal move tool.
Silk

Yeah, you know I did some knots recently - not the rope plugin - and I realized I had forgotton about that tool. Could have used it. Knew there was a reason to watch it again. :)

MonroePoteet
09-21-2005, 11:43 PM
Your example of text reminds me of corduroy cloth. Anyways, I always thought the embroidery is horizontal not vertical. But I suppose it could be either. Vertically should be less work(assuming).
Silk

Only intended as an example, and it was banged out very quickly. Refining the bevel and the texture might make it less corduroy.

RE: direction, I think hand embroidery is any direction at all. I can believe machine embroidery is much easier with horizontal stitching.

That video was really nice, and I'll definitely add the braiding technique to my toolset. But, unless I'm going to get really close to it, I find the slice-n-bevel approach handy, "good enough", and very quick. Took me about 8 minutes to re-do it with horizontal stitching, but I prefer it aligned with the lettering, so I left the original posted.

mTp

Avebeno
09-22-2005, 01:30 AM
What about a nice little bump map?

safetyman
09-22-2005, 06:15 AM
Silkrooster is correct -- the threads would go horizontal, or more precisely, perpendicular to the sides of the letterform (I used to do custom computer-aided embroidery).

Lettering is almost always done with what's called a "satin" stitch pattern -- back and forth perpendicular to the sides, filling in the letters, without putting a stitch down inside a letter. This produces a "satiny", shiny texture that displays the lettering best and gives the text a very 3-dimensional quality.

However, for larger areas, or larger letters where the length of the stitch would exceed a certain undesireable length, a "fill" stitch pattern is used which produces much smaller stitch lengths and "fills in" the area. This pattern can run in any direction, and most of the time, is surrounded by a satin-stitched border that hides the edges (fill stitch edges look ragged). The result of this stitch pattern produces a flatter, denser area of thread.

I know this doesn't answer the original question, but hopefully it will bring some idea to light which would help with completing your task.

MonroePoteet
09-22-2005, 10:16 AM
Very interesting! Thanks for the info.

I guess I'd have to pay a short-sighted little old lady extra to embroider it like I rendered, since I *like* it that way.

mTp

Surrealist.
09-22-2005, 02:20 PM
Here's a reference.

Surrealist.
09-22-2005, 02:54 PM
OK Couldn't resist messing with it.

Used as a bump color and specularity map. To create the color. I used it as an alpha map. One inverted and stacked to create two colors.

Just a thought as a way to go if you can get a bump map that is workable or one idea is to create the geometry then render with radiosity to get the bump map and then apply this way for render speed in an animation or other use.

As a thought, basic embroidered letters are available that you can iron on fabric. Not only that there are places online I'm sure you could send them a digital file and they will embroider onto a fabric for not too much of a cost. If there is a specific design you have to reproduce or one you have to create, that design could be sent as a digital file, embroidered and then scanned and used thusly.

meanlebh
09-22-2005, 02:58 PM
and here is another one....




....sorry I couldn't resist....didn't intend to offend any yankees fans..... :) didn't mean to highjack the thread either...back to the topic....

Surrealist.
09-22-2005, 05:28 PM
No offence taken here, I am noit a Yankee fan, it was just close to hand - or to head. But that's hillarious just the same. :)

OK now everybody, go ahead, take the cap off your head and scan it. :D

EDIT: In case any of the lawyers from MLB are crusin' this site I am not advocating copyright or trademark infringement. :D