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View Full Version : rendering out for polarised 3d glasses?



cresshead
08-20-2005, 01:33 AM
hi
we've just got back from the national space centre in leicester,U.K. and they had a rather nifty motion controlled space ride that used polarised 3d glasses to view the CGI generated space experience.

so how would you set up a render in lightwave for polarised rendering?

steve g

Jure
08-20-2005, 01:45 AM
hi
we've just got back from the national space centre in leicester,U.K. and they had a rather nifty motion controlled space ride that used polarised 3d glasses to view the CGI generated space experience.

so how would you set up a render in lightwave for polarised rendering?

steve g

AFAIK polarised 3D movies are displayed by using two projectors where each has different rotation of polarizing filter in front of the lens.
So I guess you'd only need to render out an animation twice with cameras about eyes width appart. Hook that up with two projectors with polarizing filters and that's about it.

The stereoscopic rendering in camera panel is for red-blue glasses though.

cresshead
08-20-2005, 03:37 AM
thanks! :)

that was a fast response!...nice one! :beerchug:

JamesCurtis
08-22-2005, 09:10 AM
Of course you'd have to have a way for both projectors [video?] to be synced up to play together. I suppose if they were started at EXACTLY the same time it'd work okay.

Lamont
08-22-2005, 10:27 AM
Of course you'd have to have a way for both projectors [video?] to be synced up to play together. I suppose if they were started at EXACTLY the same time it'd work okay.Yeah, have the video play off one computer with dual videocard ports (VGA/DVI to VGA adapter). It will work fine. Set the screen to clone and that's it. Or even one videosource and split the signal.

Be very careful on the lens' you buy they really can't take the heat of the projector and expect to replace them every month or so because they will burn, and you'll loose the 3D effect in the center. There are other brands that are for projectors, but they are exspensive as heck. Make sure you buy the correct screen to project on.

And you can buy linear polarized glasses for circular polarized projector lens. Circular polarized glasses are really $$$ and not worth it for non-theater seating.

Also, you will need a stand that will allow fine tuning of the projectors.

Lynx3d
08-22-2005, 01:05 PM
Set the screen to clone and that's it. Or even one videosource and split the signal.

And what effect are two identical video signals supposed to give? :question:

Lamont
08-22-2005, 01:39 PM
And what effect are two identical video signals supposed to give? :question:You offset the projectors for video rendered with one camera, it will give the 3D effect really easy, and in most cases not different from having two different views (left and right video). This is easy, and can work with any room size and audience size.

BUT if you want to have one video, AND left and right view. Comp the video's together (1280x480 errr whatever you want to set the monitors to), and set the monitor to "span". It is still ONE video, with left and right. The video has to be made with a particular room size and audicence in mind. Because the projectors have to match the offset set up in the 3d world and the focal points, or the image will "tear", and can cause headaches or nausea.

Mebek
08-22-2005, 01:43 PM
The stereoscopic rendering in camera panel is for red-blue glasses though.

Actually no, it just renders two images, one marked L, one marked R, each from a camera offset equal to the distance specified (default 60mm). There is no red or blue tinting involved.