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View Full Version : For everyone who is thinking about getting a digital camera



blinblue
04-30-2003, 11:30 AM
Two words to you: GET IT!
They are very useful for modeling (getting things just the way you want it, instead of looking for ages on the internet), can be useful for texture odd objects that you can't really find on the internet (like you bathroom floor tiles that no one else has), though most texture you can find online. They are also good for taking pictues of places/buildings you been to, so that you can model using the real thing.
I am very happy with my new digital camera, it is almost part of the family (well, it isn't that good).
:D

kuroyume0161
04-30-2003, 10:41 PM
Yes, I agree. Worth the cost as long as it's 3+ Megapixels. 5 or 6 is nice, but now you're getting into more professional pricing ranges. Get the best that you can almost not afford! ;0)

As for myself, a Canon PowerShot G2 which is very nice - sufficient for my needs without breaking the bank. Added a 1GB microdrive, a wide angle lens, an extra battery, and I can shoot all day.

And, importantly, get a tripod and proper lighting for doing indoor shoots of objects, people, etc. It makes a world of difference when trying to get crisp, non-specular, non-shadowed textures from the real world into a computer image.

What did you get? Sounds like you're enjoying it very much.

Kuroyume

Bytehawk
05-01-2003, 05:38 AM
Indeed, there's a world of fun out there !

You can also use it to get a better grasp at framing something.

Heimhenge
05-01-2003, 09:57 AM
I totally agree. It's a fantastic adjunct to the modeling tools, and not just for textures. I needed a custom base made for a marble table top we recently purchased, so I took a digital photo of the table top and applied it to a disc surface in Modeler. Then I played around with lathe and extrude until I got the shape we were looking for as a base. I printed the picture, as well as the orthogonal projections from Modeler, took them to a woodworker with a REAL lathe, and he produced the actual base.

It was my first project with LW and a lot of fun too!

Image of simulated table/base attached ...

blinblue
05-01-2003, 05:55 PM
Originally posted by kuroyume0161
Yes, I agree. Worth the cost as long as it's 3+ Megapixels. 5 or 6 is nice, but now you're getting into more professional pricing ranges. Get the best that you can almost not afford! ;0)

As for myself, a Canon PowerShot G2 which is very nice - sufficient for my needs without breaking the bank. Added a 1GB microdrive, a wide angle lens, an extra battery, and I can shoot all day.

And, importantly, get a tripod and proper lighting for doing indoor shoots of objects, people, etc. It makes a world of difference when trying to get crisp, non-specular, non-shadowed textures from the real world into a computer image.

What did you get? Sounds like you're enjoying it very much.

Kuroyume
Well I went on the cheap end of things (I wasn't too sure if I really needed it) And got a 3 Megapixel Olympus D-550. 2.8x opitical zoom and decent amount of user-changeable settings (you do not have wide control over things like contrast/saturation/white balance, but it does a great job for the price).
The pros: Cheap, great picture, good battery life (get rechargables), the ablility to have non-compressed pictures, great for point-and-shoot pictures.
Cons: No changleable lens, not quite enough control on picture settings, just the slightest purple fringing on really high contrast parts of a picture, annoying pop-up flash (not that importent).
So, if you live with the limitations, or you can't live without the extra $300 for a better camera: Get it. Or wait until something new comes out...

kuroyume0161
05-01-2003, 07:24 PM
Sounds like a good camera. Olympus makes some quality film cameras so their digitals should be comparable. 3MP is a good digital base.

Digitals have a different "feel" than film cameras. I'm no professional (or even amateur) photographer, but switching from film to digital did require some changes. There are many more controls and post-processing that can be done, so you really want to read the manual and test the settings.

Also, if you can get into a Photo store class on digital cameras, you can learn alot that could make that 3MP camera worth every penny. If not that, check online or get a book on digital cameras - lots out there.

And, finally, all basic photographing techniques still apply. That's why I mentioned the tripod and lighting. I have RealViz's ImageModeler software (which takes a set of photos of an object from different angles and helps you create a textured 3D object from them), and it really required these for the best output. The tripod is obvious - stability. I play much guitar and type like a Dickens but my hands aren't steady enough to take critical photos. Lighting, especially diffuse, was required because you don't want highlights and shadows on the 3D texture of the model. A light tent (lights outside of a sheer enclosure) diffuses the light so that these are reduced.

Enough about photography. Enjoy your new camera and, of course, have fun using it!

Kuroyume