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Boo!
07-06-2005, 02:37 AM
...hi all!...
ive been using Lightwave a lot for the last 6-12 months mainly for modelin logos, characters and animation which has come along leaps and bounds but ive now been offered work to create visuals for property developers.

i can model basic building blocks etc but i was wondering if any you LW kings and Queens :p knew of any books or training DVDs that i could jump on to to give me a crash course in using the correct tools, lighting etc...

thanks for any help on the matter

:D !

sentell01
07-07-2005, 01:30 PM
They don't have any videos that are for strictly architecture but kurvstudios.com has some really good dvd's for sale. Also, simplylightwave.com (under the "DVD's for sale" section) has a few good ones -a little pricey though. Hope this helps.

Ade
07-07-2005, 08:55 PM
Ive said a while back there is a need for some.

Boo!
07-08-2005, 03:46 AM
...thanks guys,
sentell01: i checked out the sites you mentioned. thanks. none on buildins but i have my beedy eyes on the one for the Mc Laren...BAD!...
:thumbsup:
...
Ade: am i right in sayin that you design for property development business's?...
do you use Modo to model?...i went to the website and some links for tutorials on windows by some dude called Juan J. Gonzalez...
any more advice on LW and Modo would be real nice dude... :thumbsup:
...
thanks again!!!!!!!! :thumbsup:

pauland
07-08-2005, 06:53 AM
I think there's a gap in the market for Architectural training for LW..

Boo!
07-08-2005, 08:28 AM
...your tellin me!...ive been offered crazy money to do somethin i dont how to or where to start!...
im runnin around like crazy tryin to find anythin that can help me :confused:
... :help:
...ive got a meetin later today with a med weight client in the property biz...aaaaarrrggghhh!...
id pay almost anythin for some trainin right now...
...
the search continues!... :thumbsup:

sentell01
07-08-2005, 10:49 AM
glad to have helped - my personal opinion on the lack of "buildin" tutorials is that if you can model something like the McLaren (simplylightwave.com) or the SSR Chevy (kurvestudios.com) than a building is fairly straightforward (but what do I know - here in the U.S. a building is usually just a box with windows). The important thing is to learn how to use the tools in modeler.
Good luck!

toby
07-08-2005, 03:08 PM
This may be of some help, it's a window-making Lscript

http://www.flay.com/GetDetail.cfm?ID=1869

Avalon
07-08-2005, 07:47 PM
glad to have helped - my personal opinion on the lack of "buildin" tutorials is that if you can model something like the McLaren (simplylightwave.com) or the SSR Chevy (kurvestudios.com) than a building is fairly straightforward (but what do I know - here in the U.S. a building is usually just a box with windows). The important thing is to learn how to use the tools in modeler.
Good luck!

Modeling buildings is a little more complicated than that----if you want them to look good. Or be anywhere close to being accurate. Good looks and accuracy are important if you want to solicit work from architects or developers. I have been training myself to create models from my own architectural designs. It has been a slow lonely unsupported process. And I think I have come up with a pretty fast system for importing autocrud drawings and then creating the model from the imported polygons. The hardest part for me was figuring out what combination of autocad export and lightwave import works best and cleanest. Then what do you do with the imported geometry to avoid redrawing anything. I found that autocads layers came in as surfaces. So I filtered the surfaces using the statistics panel. Then cut the selected surfaces to individual layers. Once I had things where I wanted them. I move things to the appropriate height. And then extrude everything to the correct height. then I come back in and create whatever details, parapets or roofs that are needed. I finally am to the point where I can create a model of an elementary school from the autocad drawing in about an hour and a half. Then, of course, I have to come back in and map materials. But thats easy; because everything comes from autocad as a surface.
One note; most autocad drawings have information in them that you do not use. So it is best to clean up the drawing before importing it. I have also noticed that poorly drawn cad drawings results in sloppy models. So if you are doing architectural models----it helps if you know a cad program.
I have also played with using coreldraw drawings in this same process. Except I export the drawing to an AI file and then import it with the ESPF import tool. And it works--but occasionally you get unexpected results. But I generally do my site plans in this manner and buildings with autocad.

KPS
07-10-2005, 11:24 AM
I had an architectural job to do and could not find any tutorials on the subject.
The client supplied printed floor plans and artist drawings. I then scanned these in and placed them as back images and started modeling away.
I know that there were things that could have been done better to maximize my time but I took the long way. I've learned some techniques that will help me on my next project. attached is the final project.

Boo!
07-10-2005, 12:36 PM
...that looks real nice dude!!.
i think i'll have to take your advice on that method till i find a tutorial...
...
:thumbsup:
...