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View Full Version : NewTek’s LightWave 3D® Leading the Way with Support for Multi-Core Processors



Kurtis
04-18-2005, 09:38 AM
Las Vegas, NV, NAB Booth SL1949 – April 18, 2005 -- NewTek, Inc., manufacturer of industry-leading 3D animation and video products, announced today the optimization of their Emmy ® Award-winning LightWave 3D ® for multi- core processor systems. Following NewTek’s industry first 64-bit beta announcement, LightWave 3D is leading the industry again as the first professional 3D graphics application to provide optimization and support for multi-core technology. Native multi-core support will be included in the upcoming 8.3 release of LightWave 3D.

More... (http://www.newtek.com/news/releases/04-18-05e.html)

js33
04-18-2005, 02:02 PM
Sounds good just wish Opterons weren't so expensive. Have you seen the prices for the highend dual-core Opteron? Something like $2500 per chip. :eek:
So I assume the dual-core support is for AMD and Intel?

Intel has released the first P4 based dual core at a much more reasonable $240. Although they also have the EE (Extremely Expensive) version, not sure of the price on that one.

But 64 bit and dual-core at the same time. For LW and hardware. Sweet!

Cheers,
JS

HarverdGrad
04-18-2005, 07:25 PM
...LightWave 3D is leading the industry again as the first professional 3D graphics application to provide optimization and support for multi-core technology.

Can you provide some additional detail? Maybe a tech spec of realworld performance? How is it optimized for Dual Core? Enquiring minds want to know.
I didn't realize that support for dual core would even be an issue. Won't the majority of software Apps run on a dual core system anyway?
Thanks for any info!
Best Regards!

Verlon
04-18-2005, 08:06 PM
The Intel dual core is a paper launch. Its easy to set a low price on a product you aren't really selling (feel free to hit independent sources on this, I try to be objective but favor AMD for various reasons and state as much often). Also, it is simply 2 cores in the same package, not a true dual core design (read about memory bandwidth and management issues on your favorite indepedent sites).

That dual core opteron is pretty normally priced for a high end server chip all the way back at least to pentium pro days. But, yeah, I will have to wait for a dual core system. Expect dual core desktop Athlons later this year or maybe early next year from what the press releases say. Thos will be more affordable.

Will LW8.3 include the 64bit version?

When will LW8.3 show up anyway?

Is Elvis working at Newtek?

js33
04-18-2005, 09:51 PM
I appreciate the advancements in the Opteron but they are priced a tad bit too high for a regular everyday workstation. The cheap Intel dual cores or perhaps the Athlon 64 dual cores would probably be more common in your average workstation. I have no particular preference but have always used Intel although my wifes new puter is an Athlon64.

Cheers,
JS

tektonik
04-18-2005, 10:28 PM
the high priced opterons that are the first to go out the door are for 8 way servers (8xx series) in a monnth or so you will see the 2xx series that are cheaper than xeon and are gonna give you dual dualcores so 4 processors! and 64 bit and low power consumption (compared to the fat p4)

Karmacop
04-19-2005, 12:35 AM
Can you provide some additional detail? Maybe a tech spec of realworld performance? How is it optimized for Dual Core? Enquiring minds want to know.
I didn't realize that support for dual core would even be an issue. Won't the majority of software Apps run on a dual core system anyway?
Thanks for any info!
Best Regards!

All apps will be able to run on dual core machines, they'll just only use one core. What they may have done, is split lightwave into two threads, so that thei nterface does to one core, and the geometry processing would go to the other. This would mean the interface would be interactive even if there was a lot of processing going on (it shouldn't matter but windows doesn't have great multitasking :rolleyes: ).

Just an idea of how they could speed up the app, but I'd like to know exactly what they're doing too.

Captain Obvious
04-19-2005, 04:56 AM
I don't mean to sound like a bastard, but... ehh... This is just marketspeak. Every application has native support for multi-core processors. It's not up to the application to assign threads and such, the kernel handles that. Lightwave doesn't know or care how many cores your computer has, it just sends a bunch of threads for rendering, and the kernel decides what to do with them.

mattclary
04-19-2005, 05:56 AM
Basically they are making use of more multi-threading. As far as I know, the renderer is the only thing that is currently multi threaded. If they make other features use multiple threads, that is definitely a worthy venture and will help us users. Everyone should be happy about this, this probably takes a lot of work on Newtek's part. I'm no programmer, but from what I understand, creating a multi-threaded app is not a simple procedure.

Captain Obvious
04-19-2005, 07:03 AM
Basically they are making use of more multi-threading. As far as I know, the renderer is the only thing that is currently multi threaded. If they make other features use multiple threads, that is definitely a worthy venture and will help us users. Everyone should be happy about this, this probably takes a lot of work on Newtek's part. I'm no programmer, but from what I understand, creating a multi-threaded app is not a simple procedure.
Multi-threading an application can be a piece of cake, and it can also be really difficult. With Lightwave, I have no idea... But saying it's "multi-core support" is still just marketspeak, plain and simple. The renderer, and all other multi-threaded parts of Lightwave, is already capable of using both cores. If the dynamics are calculated in one thread and the IK motions in another, that kind of multi-threading will also take advantage of both cores already. I guess they multi-threaded it more, which is great nonetheless!

mattclary
04-19-2005, 07:42 AM
The renderer, and all other multi-threaded parts of Lightwave, is already capable of using both cores

I agree with that. Anyone who knows anything about mulit-threading will agree with that.

My point is, I think rather than making a statement about increasing thread-count (and attracting users who are looking for softer bed sheets ;) ), Newtek has spoken in terms that non-technical users will immediately understand. I don't feel Newtek is trying to be "sneaky".

caesar
04-19-2005, 08:18 AM
Las Vegas, NV, NAB Booth SL1949 – April 18, 2005 -- NewTek, Inc., manufacturer of industry-leading 3D animation and video products, announced today the optimization of their Emmy ® Award-winning LightWave 3D ® for multi- core processor systems. Following NewTek’s industry first 64-bit beta announcement, LightWave 3D is leading the industry again as the first professional 3D graphics application to provide optimization and support for multi-core technology. Native multi-core support will be included in the upcoming 8.3 release of LightWave 3D.

More... (http://www.newtek.com/news/releases/04-18-05e.html)

Im really impressed how NT is taking LW to new levels with new tools, bug hunting and hardware support.
I only loved to know more details...I think Matt said the 64 bit can handel 5x more poly models than the current LW...whats the impact in window update frames? Dynamics calculation? Sweet....!

mattclary
04-19-2005, 08:53 AM
I think Matt said the 64 bit can handel 5x more poly models than the current LW...

My source, FYI:

http://vbulletin.newtek.com/showthread.php?t=31413&highlight=galactica