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exit6
04-07-2005, 10:47 PM
A long time client of mine asked me to do a HD test for him, to see if I have "HD capability." So I'm reproducing an NTSC graphic I did in HD, and am shocked at the difference. The render is literally 5 times slower, and the images are 7 times the size. Any HD people out there? For me to keep my pipeline flowing at the same speed as it does now in HD, it looks like I'll need a render farm of 20 boxes (!) and some crazy new storage solution that I haven't even priced yet. Do I need to tell this guy that for me to do HD it will cost like 4 or 5 times what I charge now? That will definitely scare them away. Any advice?
Thanks --

Hervé
04-07-2005, 11:23 PM
Well I think very little small production houses are going to follow that... at least in the next couple of years... + we have to change all TV's of the planet.... so I think you (we) have some time to save money for a farm...

Indeed, yes much bigger images take a mucho bigger time to render... only logic here... (5 times you said...)

Producing HD stuff is going to cost an eye at the begining, but after a while, we'll see special solution come to market...

I remember working in a video studio 20 years ago, and boy just a small broadcast text generator would cost one eye, a kidney and a leg.... (and was VERY limited)I mean.... look today..

So stay confident... :)

off course doing HD NOW, cost some extra bucks...

Celshader
04-07-2005, 11:30 PM
Producing HD stuff is going to cost an eye at the begining, but after a while, we'll see special solution come to market...

Yeah, dual-core CPUs (http://www.anandtech.com/news/shownews.aspx?i=23989). Woo!

Captain Obvious
04-08-2005, 12:21 AM
Yeah, dual-core CPUs (http://www.anandtech.com/news/shownews.aspx?i=23989). Woo!
Dual dual-cores = yum yum yum.

Mdust
04-08-2005, 01:48 AM
Tv's for the whole planet or not, HD is here. That's a fact. Now, maybe you won't have to make that a checklist just yet on delievery for overseas distribution for product but I'll bet domestically it is a standard - not just from my brief experience selling my film but from just pure observation. Every cable station is providing a feed, even local stations are brocasting - you can actually pick it up with an antena in some places! There are rows and rows of TV's at the electronics stores that are HD compatable and it is generally becoming the rule rather than the exception.

My finger on the pulse from the hip response is be ready. Broadcast-wise it is becomming a standard. In fact I'd say it already is. TV stations know that there isn't a HDTV in every home, that's why they are broadcasting BOTH.

But the reality is they cant broadcast BOTH if you only can deliver one.

This is why you have a client asking for it.

My advise would be to get specific. WHAT standard? 1080 or 720? Reality is there isn't any brodcast 1080 at the moment.

Another thing to consider is conversion But first consider what you REALLY have to do. Then start in on the work-arounds.

I don't know what your product is or anything about your pipeline, but I'd say you may as well brace yourself and start figuring out how to deliver some form of HD at near the same prices you are at now to keep your clients.

There is another shift in the works. While we were sitting here in the lull being able to compete with broacast at its old standard for some oh, ten years now the shift has been slowly on the way and now it's just around the corner. But then so are a few inovations that will make it cheeper.

I don't know anything about your system but you may wind up with something new in the very near future that will do more for less an on a storage media even cheeper than what you have now - that is if you want to stay competitive.

(and that will be the end of the psyhic hotline portion of this reply)

As for now maybe you can try some form of solution that alows you to render at a slightly higher resolution, but then up convert from there using LW as a sort of batch converter. Then simply tell your client .Yes you can have HD for a slighty higher price ( he won't - nor will anyone else he needs to deliver to - be able to really tell the difference). , keep the cash flow and then work like the dickens to figure out a real solution for the future.

I know that's a harsh look at it but really it's honest and I think it would be unwise to sit on the old broadcast standard any longer. The market is about to dictate otherwise.

Good luck

Mdust

Celshader
04-08-2005, 02:00 AM
Reality is there isn't any brodcast 1080 at the moment.

Discovery HD is 1080i, and it looks gorgeous. Other HD channels...not so high. But Discovery HD looks great.

---

For what it's worth, here's how a cost-conscious person might save money on RAM for a multiprocessor box:

Run a single, multithreaded Screamernet node on each box. Not only will the Screamernet node take advantage of both processors, it will also use all of the RAM in that box that it's allowed to use. To enable multithreading on the Screamernet node, make sure "RenderThreads" in the config file that the ScreamerNode uses is set to 2, 4 or 8.

Hervé
04-08-2005, 02:09 AM
well, that is maybe true in US, but Europe still far behind... no HD here for now... :D

Mdust
04-08-2005, 03:03 AM
Discovery HD is 1080i, and it looks gorgeous. Other HD channels...not so high. But Discovery HD looks great.

Well shiver me timbers Jen, I did not know that. Way to go Discovery!

M

radams
04-08-2005, 03:49 AM
My advise would be to get specific. WHAT standard? 1080 or 720? Reality is there isn't any brodcast 1080 at the moment.

Another thing to consider is conversion But first consider what you REALLY have to do. Then start in on the work-arounds.


Hi All,

MDust, your comment about none being broadcast as 1080 is incorrect. Infact not only is the Discovery channel going 1080i but so is CBS and NBC, It is only ABC and FOX which are 720p. Thou I agree with your other suggestions.

Exit6, You need to find out what is the native format that your client needs...720p is going to render and take up less storage than 1080i. Also find out where they post their materials to get a better understanding of that companies HD pipeline...How are you outputing your finished material now...as sequence stills or as QT or AVI clips?...Are you going out to Tape or to Hard Drives/DVD-Rom's.

By this summer and Fall many things are going to be in place to update systems and Storage systems. But realize that you are not the only business looking that this will take recapitalization...others who do HD are going to have leverage and pay off their gear too. I don't think that raising your rates at this time to do HD vs SD is a bad thing...how many post or FX companies do Film outs or HD at the same SD rates?...May be think of it this way...HD is closer to 2K film than it is to SD...Now somewhere in the middle is the cost to produce it... So Film producers save money while SD producers need to spend more money to work with HD...Not that is is over priced...but until the new technologies and workflows take hold...give it a year or so...I don't see anything wrong with charging different rates for HD than for SD.

For those even here in Europe who say why care about HD since there is few if any distribution in HD...I think you need to wake up...Almost ALL post facitilies and producers see the future that having a master product in HD gives shelf life to that product...also since so many commercials also go to film outs working with an HD master only makes this even easier and better. What we all are going to be seeing is the need to setup a master workflow and pipeline to go to a neutral res and frame rate independent solution....so we can then master to HD but then output to Film, SD, Internet, smart devices (phones,PDA), print, presentations, etc. So if you need this variety of media it only takes one post with mutltiple outputs... Most Post houses are looking to get final imagining and comps in HD and 10 bit or higher color space...then converting that to the targeted end products..(for that moment). But to have an "everygreen" master that is HD only allows it to be used for the next 10 or more years without being redone.

For Now I would recommend setting up your workflow to 720P and then upconverting if needed...I would also raise your rates slightly and setup a business plan with recapitalizating your workflows and systems...You may wish to sell off some gear to afford newer gear. But I would seriously get cracking, along with checking out some of the newer technologies and trends that will be coming out of NAB and other places...then make some informed decisions.

Good Luck to ALL!!

Cheers,

Rich
04-08-2005, 09:03 AM
Just out of curiosity, does anyone know what resolution companies like Pixar or Dreamworks render out at for film?

I one day would also like to render for HD. Currently I am working on a new animation where I am going for the wide-screen look using standard TV resolution.

I have my camera in Lightwave setup at 640x360. This is half of 1280x720. I then bring the animation into AE and put it on a 720x480 comp window for rendering out to DVD.

In the future when I can afford a better computer or render farm I will re-render it out at 1280x720 for HD.

I think it will be years before I can afford a computer that can handle 1920x1080. Just thinking about using Radiosity for something that large boggles my mind. Luckily I have FPrime so maybe it will be possible. The major problem that FPrime needs to over come though is being able to render across a network.

Celshader
04-08-2005, 09:18 AM
I think it will be years before I can afford a computer that can handle 1920x1080. Just thinking about using Radiosity for something that large boggles my mind.

In late 2003 I was using 3x9 Backdrop Radiosity on Medium-Enhanced AA 2K renders for a film project. Granted, the 20-machine render farm helped, but I don't remember render times being an issue.

Backdrop Radiosity + Textured Environment rules. :)

Intuition
04-08-2005, 10:41 AM
I have been doing HD 1080i stuff since March of 04.

It was a big jump in business costs to make the pipeline flow the same as it did in NTSC.

Bought two computers at around $4500 hundred each to keep my pipeline flowing.

The great thing is that you can charge more for producing HD content.

At least until there is more competition for HD content and the bids balance out.

Last year it was a llittle more of a mystery then it is now.

I'm not buying an HD TV until the native resolution is 1920x1080.

Most HDTVs being sold currently are 1280x720 resolution.

Big factor here is that its only a matter of time before HD is the standard. Probably two years max in my opinion. By then the prices will probably resemble that of current standard tvs and everyone will get one for Xmas, B-day, etc.

exit6
04-08-2005, 12:58 PM
The client is the History Channel, and they want 1920x1080, so maybe that's an indication of things to come. These guys expect to pay more for it ("everything in HD is more expensive," he said), so my plan is to figure out what it will cost to get the render farm up to speed, even if it means buying 15 3.0 Ghz PC's, add in all the extra stuff like network expense and KVM switches and buy lots of hard drive space. All said it looks like about 15 K. So I'll have to figure a way to transfer that cost to the client, and in short order. It comes out to a 40% increase over one season.

It's exciting though because it means that small shops like mine will be able to produce shots at the same resolution as the big boys.

Celshader
04-08-2005, 01:07 PM
...my plan is to figure out what it will cost to get the render farm up to speed, even if it means buying 15 3.0 Ghz PC's, add in all the extra stuff like network expense and KVM switches and buy lots of hard drive space.

I confess that I'm an AMD fanatic, but consider dual-Opteron machines. When the first dual-core AMD chips come out, you'll be able to drop them into your existing socket-940 machines for an easy power upgrade (after updating the motherboard's BIOS). When 64-bit LightWave comes out, you'll already have 64-bit hardware ready to switch over.

That said, use what you like. If you've always used Intel, go for Intel.

*happy with her dual-Opteron workstation; looking forwards to dual-cores!*

Cman
04-08-2005, 01:54 PM
I don't think it should be an issue to charge your client more for HD.

It's a simple fact that it will take longer to render HD, which takes system resources away from other projects.


HD is simply more expensive - that's just the way it is.

Them being upset at extra cost for HD would be equal to them be upset for extra cost for Film - it's absurd.

If you'd charge more for a 5-minute animation vs a 1-minute animation, why not charge more for rendering 5x longer?

DaveW
04-08-2005, 04:57 PM
I have my camera in Lightwave setup at 640x360. This is half of 1280x720. I then bring the animation into AE and put it on a 720x480 comp window for rendering out to DVD.

LW has a NTSC widescreen preset that will give you better quality than upscaling 640x360 to 720x480.

exit6
04-08-2005, 06:04 PM
They understand and expect to pay more for HD. My concern is if the "industry" is charging 25% more, say, and I charge 40% more. The question is how much more to charge, not whether to charge more.

Marco Solorio
04-08-2005, 08:13 PM
We have a small 8 to 9 node render farm over here, but for the mid to large scale projects, we use ResPower.com. They have something like 650 CPUs. It's all automated too... you upload your scene and assets and render away. What can take 2 or 3 days here on 8 nodes can take 30 minutes on ResPower!!! Their support is top notch as well... very friendly and nice. In fact, when we did our very first render with them, they called US (!!!!) when we were having problems getting the render started (it was a minor user error on our end). After that, we've never needed support since.

What's funny is that it may actually take longer to download your finished frames than actually rendering them! :rolleyes:

Funny thing too... LightWave users have lower fees than all the other apps they support! :D

RESPOWER rocks my world.

Mdust
04-08-2005, 08:30 PM
Hi All,

MDust, your comment about none being broadcast as 1080 is incorrect. Infact not only is the Discovery channel going 1080i but so is CBS and NBC, It is only ABC and FOX which are 720p. Thou I agree with your other suggestions.


Thanks for the additional info I was clearly missinformed there. I had been told on many occasions that there wasn't the bandwidth for 1080. So is this something that has been growing - I mean did I blink and then there are stations already broadcasting 1080 or is it something they had started from the beginning?

Thanks again for the clarification.

Mdust

exit6
04-08-2005, 08:46 PM
RESPOWER rocks my world.
What do these guys charge?

Celshader
04-08-2005, 08:54 PM
Funny thing too... LightWave users have lower fees than all the other apps they support!

It makes sense when you look at the cost of extra render nodes. A single license of LightWave comes with unlimited render nodes. Other software packages cost anywhere from a little to a lot more for extra render nodes.

Mdust
04-08-2005, 09:02 PM
I don't think it should be an issue to charge your client more for HD.

It's a simple fact that it will take longer to render HD, which takes system resources away from other projects.


HD is simply more expensive - that's just the way it is.

Them being upset at extra cost for HD would be equal to them be upset for extra cost for Film - it's absurd.

If you'd charge more for a 5-minute animation vs a 1-minute animation, why not charge more for rendering 5x longer?

You have valid sentiments. The thing is that there is a progression happening here. The trend is more for less. Also the thing is the broadcast "price point" will always remain the same. Price point is just a reality. There has been a lul here for about 10 years when video production was finally affordable. Very apt and profound in a way that we are discussing this on the Newtek forum because NT is a big part of why this is possible. Prior to 10 rto 15 years ago providing boradcast qulaity production was out of reach of the hobbiest or independent professional - mostly.

Then there was a "paradigm shift" to quote an old Toaster promo video. And those were prophetic words. What ensued was a long period of innovations in camcorders and video editing bringing broacast video into the hands of the many as well as bringing affordable highend-type graphics solutions to the smaller studio and hobbiest/professional. This is what role LW 3D has played.

But innovations continued in the highend and it has been the looming cloud overhead for many producers making thier money on "current broadcast standards" that one day they'd have to pony up the cash and go HD.

Thankfully the same innovations in computers and other production-related tools have rolled along as well and the period when only the large post houses and TV studios where the only ones to produce HD has shortended to only a few years rather than decades( only a guess here) as was the case with the older standards.

We are on the cusp of a change where the new standard is here. But because it is a brand new standard, yes for the transition period the price will be higher, but as time goes on it will settle in and be the norm and as the technology becomes more readilly available cometition will drive prices back down to that broadcast price pioint and then below again untill the next innovation.

So the point is its too late to charge in proportion to the amount of time and resources at least not for the little guy. The big post houses will hold onto the higher prices longer because of their clientel. But soon enough there just wont be any other standard and those slick highend Sony Betacam studio decks will go out into the has-been tech recycle bin with last decades's umatic 3/4 inch decks.

So anyway just my thoughts rambling on.

But you get my point I guess. This is an interesting topic for shure.

Mdust

NanoGator
04-08-2005, 09:20 PM
We have a small 8 to 9 node render farm over here, but for the mid to large scale projects, we use ResPower.com. They have something like 650 CPUs. It's all automated too... you upload your scene and assets and render away. What can take 2 or 3 days here on 8 nodes can take 30 minutes on ResPower!!! Their support is top notch as well... very friendly and nice. In fact, when we did our very first render with them, they called US (!!!!) when we were having problems getting the render started (it was a minor user error on our end). After that, we've never needed support since.

What's funny is that it may actually take longer to download your finished frames than actually rendering them! :rolleyes:

Funny thing too... LightWave users have lower fees than all the other apps they support! :D

RESPOWER rocks my world.

I hope this isn't taboo to ask, but what'd it run you?

Mdust
04-09-2005, 12:17 AM
I confess that I'm an AMD fanatic, but consider dual-Opteron machines. When the first dual-core AMD chips come out, you'll be able to drop them into your existing socket-940 machines for an easy power upgrade (after updating the motherboard's BIOS). When 64-bit LightWave comes out, you'll already have 64-bit hardware ready to switch over.

That said, use what you like. If you've always used Intel, go for Intel.

*happy with her dual-Opteron workstation; looking forwards to dual-cores!*


Not to you Jen, I know you know this already, but as a note also the 939 socket - the single chip version of the 939/940 pair - is also compatable with the dual core chips. They were built on the same dual core architechure - way to go AMD.

I have always been in favor of Intel, but am making the switch to AMD.

As to this HD situation:

On the editing side I am a huge believer in what Sonic Foundry (now Owned by Sony) has done with Vegas. They were way ahead of the curve as far as software- only editing solution. This goes back to 2000, when it was released.

I first bought it as an audio recording and editing solution. That was Vegas Audio. This was basically hipper than Protools by far(on the software end) and a few years later Protools - and everybody else - kind of made the switch to rubberband editing. Vegas had that in version 1. Thier approach was unique as well as simple slide event style editing that you see alot of now where cross fades are automatic. I don't know squat about high end systems but as far as at this level they have been way ahead of the curve.

Then came vegas video, version 1 was basically unusable, BUT the coolest thing is that it was sitting right on top of or actaully integrated with Vegas Audio a full audio production suite! That was just not happening at the time. They held on to thier position that the future was in software based video editing. So really it was only the limitations of your system.

Some five years later and look where we are. The later versions have been very useable - I edited my feature on it and it was a dream.

But aslo of note and why I brought this up was that in Version 4 of Vegas - as a free update - they made Vegas Compatable with HD - that was over a year ago. ( they are releasing V6 now)

Also now that Sony owns Vegas they are making every effort to make it integtrate into the rest of the studio world. Version 6 should be something to really consider if anyone is planning to stay ahead of thre curve and yet have an aplication that will fit into a studio envorioment as far as compatability with decks as so on.

It already supports the new Sony HDV camcorder - go figure!

But really a sales pitch as much as this is it really is a viable HD solution what with the faster proccessors comming into the market this year.

Also BFG just intorduced a 512 Meg Graphics card that is SLI compatable. So imagine two of those puppies linked in a PCI express system like the ASUS A8N SLI delux.

That and some dual core CPUs and I really think we are talking real time playback - if not real dam close of HD at least in 720. Software only!The cool thing about Vegas is it is virtually unlimited tracks of Video and Audio and it automaticvally adjusts the playback preview rate. I know others do this but they really have it refined. Also there is the possibiolity to edit low res proxy files and then render the highres version for final output.

Anyway Vegas very cool ahead of its time still. In my humble opion - as you can see. And at a great price - I think arouind a grand, more if you want it with thier DVD authoring software - which I understand will be compatable with Photoshop layers in this next version.

It's just one of those things that has gone under the radar for some reason. With Sony ahold of it it may see the light of day we'll see.

But anyway as to HD it is certainly something to consider for someone looking to build a new solution.

Mdust

Marco Solorio
04-09-2005, 02:34 AM
I hope this isn't taboo to ask, but what'd it run you?

To NanoGator and Exit6:

Their pricing is EXTREMELY fair. They have a rate calculator on their website...

http://www.respower.com/cost_calc?

You can save money too by purchasing bulk hours ahead of time. In fact, you can buy bulk pricing within a 24-hour time-frame of using their system. So if you ended up needing to re-render stuff, you can still purchase more hours to save money. Or you can just pay as you go, but that costs more in the long run.

As an example, we recently completed a very large project. One sequence alone was over 5700 frames long. Our little 9-node farm would have taken about 2 days to complete all the rendering. With ResPower it took about 45 minutes! How much did that sequence cost us to render? About $400! Your mileage will vary, but anyone who charges clients for render time (we do), will benefit from this service.

BOTTOM LINE: You can still make money on render time while offering BETTER quality to your clients. Just think, you can finally use radiosity, DOF, refraction and everything else... and in HD too! :)

They do support a lot of ScreamerNet-compatible plugins on their system like Sasquatch, SasLite, etc., but as to the exact ones I do not know. They're more than willing to add them if they don't already do (according to their site). It would be nice if they had a plugin list though. :o

Anyway, I don't mean to sound like a salesman, but ResPower has definitely saved our butts in major deadline scenarios as well as providing us an added "upgrade" to our rendering quality thanks to their abundant horse power. I can guarantee this will change the way you do business. It did for us.

Rich
04-09-2005, 07:40 AM
LW has a NTSC widescreen preset that will give you better quality than upscaling 640x360 to 720x480.

I have not concidered using that. I will do some tests to see how they come out.

Thanks!

kml12
04-09-2005, 08:22 AM
My next purchase will be a Dual machine, just gotta find time to pick my components :D

MrWyatt
04-09-2005, 08:38 AM
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2003/11/05/sony_cell_cpu_to_deliver/

can´t wait for one of these.

Axis3d
04-09-2005, 06:27 PM
We have been producing HD content for several years now and yes, rendering in HD definitely needs a longer timeframe. Our standard has always been 1920 x 1080. Not only does it take longer to render, but the setup (modeling, texturing) needs a higher level of detail to it. The same object with rounded sides/profile will need more subdivision since faceting will be more visible in HD.

I have found that rendering has taken about 3 to 4 times longer. File sizes were much larger since I tended to save out 32 bit Targas. But I did an experiment and found that the PNG file format has no visible loss but usually saves an HD frame at about 1 megabyte or less. So, my drive capacity has not needed to increase that much. The only problem comes if I need to composite on the Flame, which can't read PNG files. But if I'm compositing in After Effects there is no problem.

Amadeus0
04-12-2005, 07:40 PM
About the Cell article (just a little math for some fun):

64-Cell chip=2 TeraFlops
2000 Opteron x44 (1.8Ghz)=10 TeraFlops
Or 400 Opteron x44's=2 TeraFlops

Ok.

Dual Core will cut that number in half (200 Opterons) , then add in the fact that faster Opterons are out (x52=2.6Ghz a 45% Speed increase) so that drops the number even further to 110 Opterons.

Nice.

But wait. Sony is saying 1-3 years from now these 64-core chips will be out. AMD states that quad core chips will be in late 2006/early 2007 (reducing the number to 55 x52 Opterons), factor in a speed increase (according to AMD on .065nm) to about 3.4Ghz (30% faster then a x52 chip) and that knocks the number down even further to 40 CPUs.

Not looking so hot now. How much will these 64-cell chips cost? What OS and Applications will you run on it? Even if you keep running Linux/Windows/OSX and just add such a chip as an expansion board what speed slow down will you experience doing that?

And remember that if Sony is using typical 'Sony-speak' those 2-Teraflop chips most likely wont be able to (in the real world) run close to that speed, where as the Opteron figures are (based on) current real-world tested figures. (From what I can tell...) :D

Not dogging Cell, but something to think about...

(And the more I think about it, the more I'd like an eight-way 64-Cell(ed) System running LW, that's been optimized.)

hehe. ;)

GraphXs
04-13-2005, 01:31 PM
What a great read.

I have a Q for the people who are using 1080i, what do you out-put the 1080i to. DVD and tape only support NTSC. Does Mini-DV or any digital format support that res. Or is it a digital file? Do they sell HDTV output cards for computers?

When I did my animated short, I only exported it at NTSC for DVD. I ran a test to render at 1080i and did compositing in AE, but AE was so slow it made it impossible to work with the res. How do you composite in AE at that res without AE choking? Do you use a smaller res image then do a swap at render time?

I can’t wait until the new DVD formats come. 1080i will become the standard. I hope a lot of new compression types come with it. :D

Celshader
04-13-2005, 06:02 PM
I have a Q for the people who are using 1080i, what do you out-put the 1080i to. DVD and tape only support NTSC. Does Mini-DV or any digital format support that res. Or is it a digital file? Do they sell HDTV output cards for computers?

You can buy a D-VHS player (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=productlist&A=details&Q=&sku=348125&is=REG) that can record 1080i. Make sure it has a Firewire input for recording off of your computer.

I am not 100% sure of the codec used, though.

:o

T-Light
04-13-2005, 07:12 PM
Just had a quick look at the JVC there Celshader, weird. We don't even have HDTV in the UK yet and last year one of the major high street electrical stores stopped selling VHS altogether!

Anyway, the article said the JVC recorded at 28.2 Mbps, that's pretty much DV speed so I'd reckon it's MPEG2 HDV or something remarkably similar. Probably a good format to show people your work, but I wouldn't go using it for backup :D

joschy
04-14-2005, 02:34 AM
#Amadeus0
here are more info´s: http://arstechnica.com/articles/paedia/cpu/cell-1.ars

And it´s not only Sony. IBM and Toshiba also there....and I´ve read that the cell is independent from any OS....you can run Win, Linux, Mac OS etc. at the same time...

I think, that exciting times comes :D . My opinion.

Here another more interesting link :eek: : http://www.optware.co.jp/english/what_040823.htm

Nice storage solution for the future....

greatings

munky
04-14-2005, 01:42 PM
Hi There everyone,

here is a useful link

http://www.hdforindies.com/


and here is something that might or might not be useful as when I get technical I go all wobbly get things wrong and have to lie down for a while.

In the Uk pretty much all the BBC's stuff is Widescreen(16x9). What the people with (12x9 or 4x3 as it's more commonly called) get is a separate output that has been ARCed that is, a 16x9 output (which would have to be letterboxed on a 4x3 tv to see all of the picture) blownup to give 4x3 or a 14x9 letterbox. So much of what is filmed for the uk is shot to protect for 4x3 transmission.
Why bore eveyone with this, well at the end of the day everything is done widescreen and the old 4x3 is made from that. I'd think that the conversion to HD will be the same with your old NTSC stuff being made from the higher resolution output.

Also the effect over here in the uk will see a lot of programmes made in HD as sales to the states of programmes and co-productions between US and European film makers and broadcasters will dictate that programmes will have to be made in HD to be sold over in the US. So we in the Uk will be facing this adventure sooner than we think!

I just did some work on a short film that was shot in HD. The footage for me was in DVCPRO HD 1080i60 and Running it off a Media G Raid (firewire 800) it played on my G5 fine. If it had been full HD I would have had to spend at least £2600 on a fat and wide raid setup. So there are some cheaper ways of doing things. Also Final cut pro HD and Motion with their G5 optimisation might be worth a consideration (on the comping / editing front)

Checkout www.blackmagic-design.com

for Uncompressed videocards SD/HD blah blah


If I've made any sense then miracles do occasionally happen and if not then hope the links will be of use.

regards

paul

GraphXs
04-14-2005, 09:39 PM
Thx for the links and HD info.