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WilliamVaughan
04-01-2005, 03:33 PM
Anime Eye Spec Tutorial

Nick's tutorial just went live:
http://www.newtek.com/products/lightwave/tutorials/animation/animeeye/index.html

shows how we pulled off eye specs in Spoonman

Fasty
04-02-2005, 04:31 AM
Thanks! :cool:

ned
04-02-2005, 04:46 AM
Here's what's going to be an unpopular opinion, I'm sure.

I watched the movie yesterday. Thought it was great. But one of the things that I found distracting in the movie were the pulsing specs in the eyes. I thought that it was way too exagerated and distracting.

Now that I see how much work went into them, I think it was not worth it.

My opinion.

riki
04-02-2005, 05:39 AM
Looks good, I like the look and feel that they've achived with 3d. I just wish the trailer was a bit bigger.

jan_muentinga
04-02-2005, 12:12 PM
Here's what's going to be an unpopular opinion, I'm sure.

I watched the movie yesterday. Thought it was great. But one of the things that I found distracting in the movie were the pulsing specs in the eyes. I thought that it was way too exagerated and distracting.

Now that I see how much work went into them, I think it was not worth it.

My opinion.

MHH, sorry
but i have too agree.
These pulsing lights are strange.
Why are they pulsing?

cheers,
Jan

WilliamVaughan
04-02-2005, 05:04 PM
The pulsig is to match teh pulsing that they do in lots of Anime....we watched it frame by frame and matche dthe rate that they pulse in the 2d films....

Celshader
04-02-2005, 08:11 PM
These pulsing lights are strange.
Why are they pulsing?

Good question.

From what I've seen in hand-drawn cartoons, it seems to be cheap visual shorthand to show that the character's overcome with emotion. The pulsing specular highlight's easier to draw and time than eyes shifting back-and-forth rapidly in their sockets.

Example: in the hilarious Dragon Half (http://www.animeondvd.com/reviews2/disc_reviews/3278.php) cartoon, half-dragon Mink (http://www.animegalleries.net/album/248/img/13) has just learned that her favorite rock star moonlights as a dragon slayer, and that she doesn't have a snowball's chance of hooking up with him. The specular highlights in her eyes pulse rapidly for a few seconds before she runs away, sobbing.

Earlier in the same cartoon, Mink learns that her beloved rock star is having a concert. She imagines him singing a love song to her, and the next shot shows her head tilted up with a dreamy expression and a faraway look on her lovestruck face. I remember the specular highlights being drawn oversized and pulsing on that shot, too.

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On a held cel, it might also used to focus attention on the character's eyes and to keep the shot from looking static.

Example: in the beautiful (if melodramatic) Fatal Fury: The Motion Picture (http://www.animeondvd.com/reviews2/disc_reviews/315.php), a mysterious girl on the run (Sulia (http://www.projectbag.com/fatalfury/ff3_sulia_pics.html)) bumps into the hero (Terry Bogard). She apologizes, and the next shot is just a close-up of her, a single beautifully-drawn held frame. She's looking up into the (off-camera) hero's eyes, and the only things keeping the shot alive are a push-in (dynamic camera) and pulsing specular highlights. The specular highlights served three functions here: they helped keep the character alive, they conveyed that she was troubled, and they drew your attention (and, one would think, the hero's attention) to her incredibly lovely eyes.

---

I think I've also seen pulsing specular highlights used when a primary light source is inconsistent, like characters gathered around a flickering fire. I've seen flickering specular highlights when characters are in front of a wavering candle flame or fire, for sure, but I might also have seen pulsing specular highlights used. I'd have to double-check on that one.

---

So, I think animated specular highlights in a character's eyes can help convey emotion and keep otherwise-static drawings looking alive in a "held cel" shot. It's a trick born of unforgiving budgets and time constraints on lower-cost, hand-drawn cartoons, and they use it because it works.

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I'm not 100% sure about using animated specular highlights in my own celshaded work yet, since celshading relies more on 3D models than drawings. URDA (http://www.celshader.com/journal/archives/00000011.htm) and Magical Play (http://www.celshader.com/journal/archives/00000030.htm) proved to me that 3D tricks (http://www.celshader.com/exploit.html) can work fine in celshading, but I'm still not certain about borrowing visual shorthand tricks from the hand-drawn cartoon world, even though I see artists attempt them in celshading. Molly, Star-Racer (http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/encyclopedia/anime.php?id=3633) and Magical Play both used the anime-sweatdrop (http://www.umich.edu/~anime/info_emotions.html), for example.

If I can, I plan to use full character animation techniques (http://www.animationmeat.com/index2.html) to keep my LightWave-"drawings" alive. If I want to convey that a character's angry or upset, I hope I can show that through his or her actions alone, without using visual shorthand.

'Course, I have to finish building my blasted character, first...

---

If a celshader artist enjoys using visual shorthand, it's cool. I create what I create because I love certain things; other artists should create what they love best. Follow yer muse. :cool:

SplineGod
04-02-2005, 11:46 PM
I think another reason its done is to show the eyes becoming moist from strong emotions. :)

danilo
04-03-2005, 04:15 AM
Like,when your eyes are "filling with tears".
d

jan_muentinga
04-03-2005, 04:22 AM
ok, thanks for taking the time to explain.
Makes sense now.

Cheers,
jan