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paulmcg1
03-15-2005, 07:05 PM
I was wondering what I would need to do to render to a DVD that will play on my DVD in great quality, well (DVD) quality. Currently at the moment im rendering a uncompressed AVI at 800x600 and I want to put it on a DVD to be able to view on my TV. Now usually when I convert them to MPEG-1 I can see pixels even if I put the bitrate all the way up to 9,000 using TMPG. But I want to be able to put it on the TV without seeing pixels. So can someone please tell me what I should do as far as the format It should be in and everything I need to know in order to get this on a DVD :).

Thanks,
Paul

Jeff_G
03-15-2005, 07:17 PM
Render out image sequences. Then you can experiment with different codecs for your dvd player. Also, if you are going to diaplay on a NTSC TV, render out D1 res, which is 720x486 with 0.9 pixel aspect. There is a drop down for this in the camera panel.

paulmcg1
03-15-2005, 07:25 PM
Thanks Jeff, I wouldn't of thought of rendering image sequences before hand to test out the codecs. Last time I always just burned the video onto the DVD to test it out and I went through alot of DVD's and alot of time doing it that way. No wonder why I gave up so early heh. Great idea! Yea im going to be rendering it to a NTSC TV. What program should I use to burn it to a DVD though. I don't have any money so if you know of any free ones please let me know heh :rolleyes: .

Thanks
Paul

Mdust
03-15-2005, 08:01 PM
Now usually when I convert them to MPEG-1 I can see pixels even if I put the bitrate all the way up to 9,000 using TMPG. But I want to be able to put it on the TV without seeing pixels.

If you are rendering out to uncompressed .avi, this is not the source of your problem so renering frames won't fix that - though it's a fine idea anyway.

Your culprit is Mpeg 1 - that's less than Mpeg 2 - which is a higher number. And I am going to have to go with the higher number and oh, also it is the DVD standard.

Seriously, Mpeg 1 is for video CDs - you cam make a DVD in Mpeg 1 but it is not high enough in quality which is why they came up with. well, Mpeg2.

So render frames if you like but when you convert, use Mpeg2

As far as free authoring, a few years ago basic basic software was going for less than 50 bucks. If you have a DVD burner, it may have come with free software. Lots of them do - so finding a fee copy shouldn't be hard. You can probably buy stuff less than 30 bucks now.

Happy burning

Mdust

Silkrooster
03-15-2005, 10:19 PM
MDust, is correct in order to view the video at full resolution on a DVD it must be Mpeg2. Tmpeg does come with a 30 day trial for mpg2. So if you want to do this, this purchasing the license is a cheap alternitive to buying a full blown program with mpeg2 built in. Then some of those, you still have to buy the license.
Mpeg1 was meant for the days when everyone had dialup and could only view 320x240 images, So mpeg1 can not be used for 640x480 or higher. However, I did see ATI use mpeg1 at high rates. But, it is possible, that internaly it is converted to mpg2.
The actual video resolution of a TV is 720x480, but 640x480 will work just fine. 800x600 would be concidered high def. So far DVD's don't support it, but I heard they will be soon, as WMV already does, so mpg2 or what ever the next version will be should support that and higher.
Silk

paulmcg1
03-15-2005, 10:37 PM
Wow! Great information you guys, thanks so much :o . I do have software called MyDVD and I think it converts your videos to MPEG2 for you automatically. I guess I'll have to try it. Thanks you guys :)

Paul

paulmcg1
03-15-2005, 10:43 PM
O btw, what about the audio and file struction? Like there are folders called VIDEO_TS and AUDIO_TS and stuff like that, what exactly do I do with those? Also what kind of audio should I use?

Mylenium
03-16-2005, 01:22 AM
O btw, what about the audio and file struction? Like there are folders called VIDEO_TS and AUDIO_TS and stuff like that, what exactly do I do with those? Also what kind of audio should I use?

Those folders are pre-defined by the DVD Video/ Audio standard and must be there. For normal Video DVDs only VIDEO_TS contains data. As for Audio use PCM (WAV) with 48 kHz. If you have the possibility, you can convert it to AC3, but I think that is only possible on more highend-ish programs.

Mylenium

paulmcg1
03-16-2005, 06:30 AM
Thanks. ;)

paulmcg1
03-16-2005, 07:20 PM
Hey everyone, ok rendering is FINALLY complete after 4 days now, heh. But I have run into a major problem. Ok I rendered my 41 second short out at 800x600 resolution. Its a Uncompressed AVI and it turned out to be over 2 Gigs. So it is huge :eek: . Now the problem is, when I go to play it I either will get an error saying that its unsupported or It will just play a black screen. I tried going into TMPG to convert it to something smaller cause that is the problem most likely and well, it wont even load into TMPG. I need to convert it to a good editing format cause now I got to edit it in After Effects and then convert it to MPEG-2. So what should I do? HELP!

Paul

Silkrooster
03-16-2005, 08:08 PM
Most video editor's don't open HD video. Some that do open them, try to reduce the video to 720x480 and the video ends up looking blurry. The editors that support HD, I have not tried yet.
Two things, I can thinks of 3 if you count rerendering. 4 days, ouch. First is use a photo editor like Corel photo-paint that can load avi's and reduced the video size. Second load the video back into lightwave as a background, change the camera properties to 720x480 and render.
Silk

paulmcg1
03-16-2005, 11:37 PM
Thanks silk. I solved it by downloading virtual dub and then cutting the video into 2 pieces and I just left it at 800x600, then I loaded the video in Vegas and now I am finished with post-production already! AND I rendered it out at MPEG-2 which Vegas does a great job of doing it. It automatically rendered it out at the resolution you said cause I guess thats the standard for MPEG-2.

Thanks for everything, everyone that posted on here....Thankyou

Paul :rolleyes: