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View Full Version : the best rez and format for a photo for a texture



twine
02-28-2005, 08:57 AM
Hi, im new to lightwave, 3 weeks or so. I have imported a few pics just for backgrounds, but a friend of mine who is a semi proffesional photographer has agreed to taking a few pics for me to use as textures. Just some basic flooring and sand, nothing to fancy. My question is what is the best format and resolution to import these pics into lightwave with?
He lives in another country and will be sending any pics via email or possibly a ftp, (a factor to be taken into account).

marble_sheep
02-28-2005, 09:17 AM
Most of the answer involves how close you think you will be moving the camera (in Lightwave) to the texture. If you know it will be far away, save memory and have it be a small texture. If you know the camera is going to get right up next to the object in question, make sure it is high-res enough to look good. Test renders are your friend in this case ;)

Here is the rule I follow... guidlines, actually... Figure out what your render size will be (i.e. 800x600, 720x480, etc.) Then figure out how close the camera will come to the object. Say you have a box in lightwave, and the side of the box will have a texture that is 500x500. Well, if your render was 720x480, then you wouldn't want the side of the box to take up the entire frame.... since 720 is bigger than 500, the texture will begin to pixelate the closer to the box you move. If the camera is close enough that only half the box is visible, try to use a texture that is twice as big, Etc Etc Etc. So if you are doing print work, you will probably need some pretty big textures. As far as format, jpeg's save memory (and HD space!) since they're smaller, but just be sure they're not overly compressed. I try to use .tif's and .tga's.

If you don't already have Photoshop, I would highly recommend it, that way your friend can send you large unedited files and you can do with them whatever you need. FTP shouldn't be an issue as long as you have a fast connection! :D

--EDIT--
One little addition to my above comments... the "Pixel Blending" option in Lightwave will actually help reduce the noticable pixelation on images that are too small... however, they do become blurry.

CB_3D
02-28-2005, 10:27 AM
sending any pics via email or possibly a ftp, (a factor to be taken into account).


Not really if you use Jpg.

BeeVee
03-01-2005, 03:08 AM
It's worth pointing out that no particular image format will save memory in LightWave, apart from using an 8-bit one instead of a 24-, 32- or floating point-image. It doesn't matter what you store it as on the disk, whether it be PNG, TIFF or TGA, LightWave will still use the same amount of memory for the image.

B

marble_sheep
03-01-2005, 07:34 AM
It's worth pointing out that no particular image format will save memory in LightWave, apart from using an 8-bit one instead of a 24-, 32- or floating point-image. It doesn't matter what you store it as on the disk, whether it be PNG, TIFF or TGA, LightWave will still use the same amount of memory for the image.

B

Thanks for clearing that up... In the past, I have checked my machine's memory usage with LW open, and it seems to be more when there are a lot of objects or lots of images. But I guess it what was from something else! :o

BeeVee
03-01-2005, 07:37 AM
No, it does make a difference to the amount of memory used when you have lots of images! That wasn't what I meant. What I meant was that the filetype of the images on disk doesn't matter, because whichever format you use, LightWave will still need the original pixel size, no compression.

B

marble_sheep
03-01-2005, 07:47 AM
No, it does make a difference to the amount of memory used when you have lots of images! That wasn't what I meant. What I meant was that the filetype of the images on disk doesn't matter, because whichever format you use, LightWave will still need the original pixel size, no compression.

B

Ahhh... right right. Sorry, too many all-nighters lately!