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kenmac
09-17-2004, 10:41 PM
Dimension XPS Series, Intel Pentium 4 Processor, (3.4GHz) w/HT Technology Extreme Edition

1GB DDR2 SDRAM at 533MHz

I guess my question is.........will I be happy with this and is this system any good?

Here is the direct link..

http://www1.us.dell.com/content/products/productdetails.aspx/dimen_xps3?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs&~ck=mn

Thanks for your imput.

Hervé
09-18-2004, 03:24 AM
Nah... it's a gaming station... you want this one... in the long run, never disapointed... !

http://www.boxxtech.com/asp/1workstations.asp

and no, I have no relations to these people... I am just a happy owner... :D

kenmac
09-18-2004, 05:07 AM
Hervé,
I priced Boxx and they were $1500.00 more dollars and that didn't include a 21" flat panel monitor.
Is the machine from Dell junk?
Am I not going to get the work done that I need to?

This is what I put together...
Dimension XPS Series, Intel Pentium 4 Processor, (3.4GHz) w/HT Technology Extreme Edition
1GB DDR2 SDRAM at 533MHz
20 in (20.0 in viewable) 2001FP Digital Flat Panel Display
250GB Serial ATA Hard Drive (7200RPM)
3.5in Floppy Drive
Microsoft Windows XP Professional,Service Pack 1, English
Intel Pro 1000 Integrated PCI NIC Card
48x CD-RW and 16X DVD+RW
Sound Blaster Audigy 2 THX Certified Sound card with DVD Audio for Dimension
160GB Serial ATA Hard Drive, 7200RPM
Type 3- Third Party At Home Service, 24x7 Technical Support, 1 Year Extended
2 Year Limited Warranty
Type 3- Third Party At Home Service, 24x7 Technical Support, Initial Year
Dimension XPS, Specialized Support


Thanks,
Ken

pauland
09-18-2004, 06:39 AM
I can't see any mention of a graphics card...

kenmac
09-18-2004, 06:45 AM
I can't see any mention of a graphics card...

I just took the stock video card. I have a really good one that I plan on using.

kenmac
09-18-2004, 08:31 AM
I decided not to buy it.

wacom
09-18-2004, 03:18 PM
While a Dell isn't the fastest/best machine on the planet, they are often stable when in the 8000+ and above catigories. You'll save a lot of money and still get a year warrenty if you use they outlet area of the dell site though:

http://outlet.us.dell.com/Dispatcher?target=InventoryPage&action=filter&lob=PREC&model_search_and_display=ALL&tgtSeg=I&srcType=xml&srcDetail=offer

You can find some good deals if you dig. These are pre-owned systems that have been gone over and are being re-sold. Check it out. The workstations come with pro, not gamer cards, a gig of more or RAM and Xenon chips- many for $1000-2000.

Trawler
09-18-2004, 10:10 PM
Hey, I'm running Lightwave on a Dell 8200 with a 1.7GHz Pentium 4, 768MB RAM, and two 80Gig harddrives. I also run Vegas Video on it, and Acid Pro, Poser 5, and Photoshop. And it does just fine. Sounds like the system at that first link would be great. And Dell support is pretty good. This is my second Dell, and I'd buy another one. Just thought you should know. :)

wacom
09-18-2004, 10:28 PM
Hey, I'm running Lightwave on a Dell 8200 with a 1.7GHz Pentium 4, 768MB RAM, and two 80Gig harddrives. I also run Vegas Video on it, and Acid Pro, Poser 5, and Photoshop. And it does just fine. Sounds like the system at that first link would be great. And Dell support is pretty good. This is my second Dell, and I'd buy another one. Just thought you should know. :)

I have an identical Dell- 8200, 1.7GHz, 768MB RAM etc. and it has ran perfectly ever since I got it. It has never crashed!

digitalillusion
09-19-2004, 01:18 PM
If you are gonna blow all that money on a dual why not buy yourself a new dual Xeon (800FSb 64 bit) rig, cheaper.

ACLOBO
09-20-2004, 05:32 PM
The question is whether you are doing a lot of professional work in lightwave or are just staring out. If you are just starting out, you don't need the best, biggest, baddest machine to flaunt around in order to run lightwave. Lightwave will run well on any P4 based system.

If you are a professional, or a rich brat that has money to throw away, then get a dream machine like a Box system. But seriously, take a look at what is really required to run an app acceptably well. Since lightwave does not utilize any special drivers for OpenGL acceleration, any decent graphics card will give you acceptable performanace as your Processor is going to dictate your redraw rates for your Lightwave displays. Why Lightwave doesn't have true hardware acceleration from these cards like other apps boggles me, but then again, maybe there are some specialized drivers out there that I don't know about.

Bottom line, get the best deal that you can afford. One of those Dell XPS machines will run lightwave really well. I think the person who mentioned that you should get a Box system was just flaunting a bit - most of us can't afford a machine whose base config is priced the same as a high end consumer PC (must be nice).

You will be happy with any decent high end consumer PC. Put as must memory as you can and get some fast drives and you will be fine.

-Adrian

p.s. Optimally, if you are not afraid of getting into it - build your own. You can really hunt around for the best parts, put them together and save a bundle. Downside is that you are basically your own tech support if something goes wrong.

Hervé
09-20-2004, 11:24 PM
AFAIK Kenmac is a Pro LW'er !.... and I am sure he was looking for a pro machine.... dont forget all these other apps you might want to run one day, like XSI.... etc...

I've bought that Boxx system (dual AMD) a while ago, and boy never regret it...it's been about more than 3 years, and the system was NEVER shut down. it's running night & day. It is really reliable machine. Like Adrian said, if you're a real pro, there is no questions (and I know you are Kenmac.... It is a realllly well built machine specially made for 3D.... you can even ask NT (tell him Proton, tell him...) :D ;)

JML
10-12-2004, 11:04 AM
prices for RenderBoxx are good,
but Boxx Workstation are way overpriced.

I one time made the research for my company
with the same components, boxx workstations were the most expensive.
way more than dell,alienware,hypersonic...

you have to be carefull when choosing a dell.. because you don't know
what stuff they put inside (motherboard type,ram brand,etc...)

the best is to build it custom, if you can't , then get custom builder
like alienware,hypersonic,boxxtech
(but boxxtech will be the most expensive)

if you want to save a lot of money and get okay components, get a dell.

JML
10-12-2004, 11:14 AM
my company got dells, they are fine.
I got mine at home from hypersonic-pc (like alienware),
they used the best components, just like alienware... but you need
to put a little more money..

(without writing my whole config, my computer is basically a 3Ghz (the higest when I bought it), and after a year and a half, the other processors were mostly like 3.0-3.6 so I overcloked mine to 3.4 very easly, and for nothing my computer is still 'high-end' for a little bit more time...)

in a few months/years, I will assemble my next computer... (more options and to save money)
I'm happy with the one I have right now.

ecjc97
11-02-2004, 03:30 PM
We work very hard to stay competitive on pricing. Best I can say is call me direct any time and I'll give you the best price I can.

Ed Caracappa
Director of Sales
BOXX Technologies
512-225-6313
[email protected]

JML
11-02-2004, 06:16 PM
my company has 5 dual renderboxxes (boxxtech) and we are very
happy about them, we are probably going to get more soon. very good price/quality ratio.
..but when we needed a workstation, at the time we looked, a few months ago, the prices were higher than other companies.. and there were nothing exceptional about the components..
that was before, it probably changed now.

sculptactive
11-04-2004, 08:33 AM
Coming from a Mac background it was hard for me to take the plunge and buy a PC. I finally bought a Dell and could not be happier.
Yes I could have spent a lot more and got a better PC, but for what I need LW to do it's perfect. The only problem you could have with LW and a PC is always the video card, but as you are happy with the one you have you will have no problems and a lot more change in your pocket if you buy a Dell.

Draven
11-04-2004, 01:00 PM
Lightwave flies on my Dell...

Dell Precision 470
1x Pentium 4 Xeon 3.0 Ghz/1mb L2/800mhz FSB (yeah, it has the 64-bit extensions)
1 GB DDR2 SDRAM
160 GB SATA HDD
Soundblaster Audigy2
Quadro FX 1300

Joebob
11-04-2004, 01:15 PM
prices for RenderBoxx are good,
but Boxx Workstation are way overpriced.

I one time made the research for my company
with the same components, boxx workstations were the most expensive.
way more than dell,alienware,hypersonic...

I priced a Boxx workstation and then tracked down all the components on NewEgg. The price difference was $1,000.

JML
11-04-2004, 05:53 PM
I did the same thing for hypersonic and with newegg I would save 700...
seeing how much I can save, my next home computer is going to be home-made...

Draven
11-04-2004, 09:04 PM
The advantage of a Boxx workstation, or a Dell, is the warranty. Boxx offers a three-year warranty (with additional terms), and Dell offers a one to three year warranty with varying levels of support. I got Dell Gold technical support, and I get web-based tech support, live 24 hour telephone tech support, and next business day maintenance. It is VERY comforting to know, for once, that if something goes wrong I won't be spending several days fixing it myself and scraping together money to buy replacement parts/waiting for replacement parts to be cross-shipped.

JML
11-05-2004, 08:56 PM
700 to 1000$ saving is worth a lot more to me than support or warrantly that
I'm probably never going to use. (never did)
and when you build custom, there are also warranty on each parts.
and you can get the components you want and trust, which will make your computer more stable. (but if you don't know which components to choose then it will be not stable)

dell will never be an option for me because I like to assemble the parts I think are best, I often look at alienware and hypersonic because they usually choose the newest best motherboard and memory,etc...
you can't customize much with dell (bios locked,etc..)...

at work, it's different...(you can't assemble all the computers except if you have a
few weeks to do it, so you need to buy the computers from somebody)
my workplace has 3 dells , they got them for the warantly and because it's cheap, not for the performance.
for our render tower, we got renderboxx for the performance and they are great.
(no time to assemble our own computer)

but for home/personal use, building your own rig is the best choice.
I guess it depends on how much you are confortable with computers and hardware.

if somebody doesn't know what a hard drive is then they should not
make it themselves and should buy a pre-made one.

JML
11-05-2004, 09:20 PM
don't get me wrong, your dell is a good computer draven, and I'm sure it's fast,
what I'm saying is that there are computers with the same
processor/memory type as yours which are faster and more stable, (for example with better motherboard, hardrive, controllers, etc...) and it may be less expensive if built yourself. but you need to be confortable with computers.

Draven
11-06-2004, 01:46 AM
Honmestly, I wouldn't have bought this machine. I'm just saying they are good boxes...

And the system I have, parted out, would cost the same as my system would cost without the warranty upgrade... 1mb cache 800mhz fsb P4 Xeon, mobo from supermicro or tyan (dual proc board, 1 cpu), Quadro FX 1300 gfx card ... not exactly cheap components...

Are you telling me your system NEVER broke down in three years and you NEVER had to replace a component? If so, encase the system in gold and put it in a museum.

JML
11-06-2004, 12:36 PM
I had 3 custom PCs and I NEVER had any hardware problems.

usually if a computer works for 6month to a year without hardware problem, then
you should not have any problem at all (except if you add something to it which might not be conpatible)... if hardware problems happen, it happens in the begining.

(the only think I wanted to replace is the battery of my notebook but that's normal, all batteries gets bad after a while especially when it notebook is on AC all the time...)

you seem like you had some problems with your other computers, which
company did you buy them from ? and what was the problem with it ?

Draven
11-06-2004, 02:43 PM
Let's see... I've had hard drives fail, power supplies fail, motherboards fail in various ways, a heat sink fall off of a graphics card (not kidding, the clips holding it on broke...)

All on systems I built myself.

All after about two years of running those systems

JML
11-06-2004, 10:20 PM
ok , don't build it yourself :)

Draven
11-06-2004, 11:07 PM
no, the problem is that the components do wear out...

why else would several of the HDD manufacurers have just *tried* to sell their drives with only a one-year warranty? Why are the warranties on most ofther components one year?

JML
11-08-2004, 08:00 AM
do you defragment your harddrives sometimes? do you have some airflow near them ?
there are warranty because sometimes component can wear out but mostly because
harddrives or other components are abuse by their users..

harddrives are the most commons in hardware problems because there are a lot
of mechanical part inside, but motherboard and memory,etc.. if it works for
a year, it works for 'life'. (unless abuse by users who runs them at 80degree celcius)

the harddrive of a friend crashed a few years ago, but I don't know anybody
close to me who had other harddrive failures.

defragment your harddrives once a while, you should be able to keep your harddrives
longer..

Draven
11-08-2004, 10:44 AM
I defrag my hard drives regularly... have done so as long as I've been using windows. The parts do eventually wear out- and I'm happy for once to not have to deal with manufacturer's draconian RMA policies and waiting a week or more for my replacement parts.