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Turner
09-07-2004, 11:07 AM
Sorry for the noob q, I can't find the answer elsewhere...

As the title asks, how do I set the working plane, e.g. one face of a dodecahedron?

thx
Andrew

TheDAve
09-07-2004, 11:27 AM
there is a free plugin called cPlane which does this, you can get it from http://www.ats-3d.com/cplane/cplane.htm

DAve

Turner
09-07-2004, 11:39 AM
Thanks!

Odd that this isn't "built in".... :confused:

cheers
Andrew


there is a free plugin called cPlane which does this, you can get it from http://www.ats-3d.com/cplane/cplane.htm

DAve

Silkrooster
09-07-2004, 05:11 PM
I guess the main reason that you can't set a working plane is because you don't need a working plane. In cad programs they use the working plane to set the third axis. In a modeling program and that pretty much includes all modeling programs, work in true 3D space. So you can move a point or a polygon in any one of the three axises. I beleive what you would like to do is set the default location of a point or poly when creating multiple instances of that point or poly. By placing your point or poly in any one of the three orthagonal view windows you are placing that point or poly in all three axises. If it is wrong just move that point or poly using one of the other windows.
If you want an exact location you can use the set value tool, this tool will move points not polys to the exact location on the axis you choose.
Silk

Turner
09-07-2004, 05:16 PM
"I guess the main reason that you can't set a working plane is because you don't need a working plane."

I think maybe what you mean is -you- don't need a working plane. If I can get one, I'll take it...

I don't think you quite understand the concept. There's no reason to suggest that the ability to work exactly on the plane you specify is anything other than helpful.

Andrew

Silkrooster
09-07-2004, 07:58 PM
Actually I have a cad program and have used working planes. To me they get in the way. It is one more thing that has to be changed to continue on. Cad programs originally were 2d and working planes was the way for them to become 3d. Like I said earlier working planes is how you alter the third axis. Nothing more and nothing less.
In lightwave when you create a poly it is on a plane a hidden one. A plane is a straight axis. Lightwave's plane starts at zero just like cad. The only difference is that you don't need to change the plane, you just move the poly where ever you place that poly is the plane for that poly.
If you took a four point poly and added a fifth point to it and moved that point the poly would no longer be planer. Thats why Newtek calls it a non-planer poly.
Anyways I am sure somewhere's there is a plugin that will change the third axis for you. Try flay.com that is where most of the plugin's are listed. If not post back here and perhaps someone could create one for you.
Silk

Turner
09-07-2004, 08:07 PM
The link that DAve supplied seems to have a reasonable solution for now - I may try that out.

For me, though, to be able to immediately assign a working plane - for example, the face of a building - is invaluable. In the long run it avoids having to move things unnecessarily after they're created.

Andrew

Snosrap
09-09-2004, 08:49 PM
I've been using cplane for a number of years now and it really is a great little plug-in. I've used it for all sorts of stuff. Sometimes when converting IGES files to LW they come in tilted in some way, and cplane makes easy work of straightening things out.

Snos

Lightwolf
09-10-2004, 02:28 AM
Sorry silk, but andrew is right, a working plane is extremely useful in 3D modelling.
Basically it allows you to re-orient the coordinate system to match the part you're working on. Very useful, especially for technical modelling...
(Just think of modelling a part to fit exactly onto a slanting polygon... )

cheers,
Mike

Silkrooster
09-10-2004, 08:29 PM
When working in an orthogonal view, yes I agree when an object is rotated it would be nice to change the working plane. However most of the time I use the perspective view. That is one view that most CAD programs lack. Which is why it is difficult to edit the third axis in a cad program. So when working in a front, side or top view, I will agree with you. As there are times I wish I could rotate one of those views. But like I said, to get around that I normally use the perspective.
Silk

Turner
09-10-2004, 08:35 PM
"However most of the time I use the perspective view. That is one view that most CAD programs lack."

I can't think of a decent CAD program that doesn't let you use a perspective view; also, being able to set a working plane is -especially- helpful in a perspective view. I don't see perspective and an assignable working plane as mutually exclusive!

Andrew

Silkrooster
09-10-2004, 09:14 PM
Now that I think of it you are right, there is a perspective view in cad. However rotating around an object is not as straight forward as lightwave. You can not just move around to the side of an object and start working on the object like you can in LW. You have to set the working plane to that side. Like I said it is just one more step. Anyways, I do agree there is a place for workplanes perhaps just as a plug in. But most of the time it does slow you down.
Silk