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adrian
09-06-2004, 02:13 PM
Hi peoples,

Ok I have a question (well 2 actually): Whilst I can create artwork on the computer, when it comes to traditional drawing skills I absolutely suck with a capital S. I mean, there are no words in the English language that can describe how bad I am. I stuggle to draw stick men.

My question is this. Do you think it is possible for someone to learn how to draw? I don't mean become a Picasso or anything, but so I could draw something that would look reasonably good?

I really want to believe that I can learn to draw, but I have grown up with the idea that it is 99% inate as to whether someone can draw or not - like playing a musical instrument.

Secondly, do you think it helps to be a good traditional artist when doing CG? Personally the fact I have never been able to draw (and a lifetime of frustration because of it) has given me my passion for CG.

The reason I ask is that I am thinking of taking an art class but that annoying little voice inside my head says "ahh what's the point you can't draw!!!!!"

Looking forward to hearing people's thoughts....

Adrian.

pauland
09-06-2004, 05:27 PM
I think that just about anyone can draw if they really want to do it and put some time in. Maybe we won't all be painting Mona Lisas, but I have seen for myself how much people can improve if they really want to.

Personally, I'd probably feel happier with some books to kick off, but that's me.

I can't draw very well, but I can make an effort sometimes that can impress the kids and my wife (if no one else).

I'd say don't be defeatist just give it a go.

Paul

P.S. I'm so old I have an O-level in Art. For my exam I had to paint a scene depicting 'Quiet'. I wanted to replicate the twilight look you get on mountain ranges, where everything loses colour and looks grey and blue.

I drew a coastline and resolved to paint everything just using blue poster colour. I'd never tried it before. It was hard to get the variations in a single colour, even with mixing, and close-to it looked poor and crude - brush strokes, etc.

My friends thought it was awful. From a distance it looked far better. It seems the examiner disagreed with my friends and gave me a grade 1. I guess beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

That marked the end of my Art career (I thought it was a waste as a subject) and it's something I very much regret dropping now.

Bytehawk
09-06-2004, 05:40 PM
You should give it a go. It can help you visualise a lot faster once you master the basics.

I tend to sketch a lot before going to the pc. That way the final image is clear to me and I get down to the job of creating exactly whit I need for that picture. Learning how to draw took me 6 months on and off doodling. Now I am good enough to show something contaptual, but not good enough to make final 2d sketches.

ACLOBO
09-06-2004, 05:59 PM
like everything else, it takes practice.. Nobody can really teach you to draw. They can show you techiniques and demonstrate, but it is up to the person that wants to be an artist to practice, practice.....

-Adrian

kmscottmoore
09-06-2004, 06:36 PM
Adrian,

This topic has been hotly debated by several pros; here's my 2:

I think drawing can be learned, just like learning to read and write. Some people will have more natural ability than others, and some will put more effort into it and take it further and push it into the realm of "High Art" but there is a basic level of skill that can be taught. Just as not everyone that learns basic literacy becomes a Shakespeare or a Hemingway, learning basic drawing will not automatically make you an artist.

Here is a link, where someone has scanned several good (out of print)books and posted them online:

http://www.saveloomis.org/

Secondly, I don't think that the skills of being able to draw and paint apply directly to 3D, even though a lot of people responsible for hiring 3D artists look for those skills, as well as traditional animation skills. Here's why:

The process of modeling, lighting, rendering, animating, etc. is more akin to a combination of sculpture and photography. Modeling in the sense of drawing (i.e. creating the illusion of form by manipulating pencils, charcoal, and the like) is not directly applicable to modeling in the sense of moving points and polygons around to define a shape. In a drawing or painting, you are fixing one particular angle at one particular point in time, and all of your time is spent making that rendering convincing. Whereas in 3D rendering, like photography, you are moving around, adjusting things, trying to find an image.

Third, I would say, in defense of the 'hiring people' that I mentioned earlier, that there is a definite difference in the quality of work by someone who has developed an aesthetic sense over time (usually with traditional media) than the work of someone who has just learned the software. Mastery of a tool does not make one a Master of the output. (I know this sounds muddled, I'll try to clear it up)

Think of a furniture maker, say the ones who made all of the fancy medieval things that you see in museums. Their output was limited by the fact that it required hours and hours of back-breaking labor to produce what they did. But, they still produced stunning work of beautiful detail. Today, we have wonderful powertools that reduce a lot of the labor part of it. But, just knowing how to use a jig saw, mitre saw, etc. won't make you a master furniture maker.

archiea
09-06-2004, 06:59 PM
.....The reason I ask is that I am thinking of taking an art class but that annoying little voice inside my head says "ahh what's the point you can't draw!!!!!"

Looking forward to hearing people's thoughts....

Adrian.

Well, if yoou knew how to draw, why would you need classes... and clasees are there to teach....

First, give yourself some confidence.... part of that is in taking baby steps... Alot with drawing is one's own desire to express themselves. try not to turn it into a chore for yourself by almost making it an assignment....

drawing and painting can teach you alot. Figure drawing heps you to break down volumes, and find the center of mass. Your poses for char animation will improve from this.... landscape painting or drawing will help plenty with composition.... color paintig will help you study color. you will find that the mental picture that you have for your 3D work will have far more textue and variety.

Go for it!!!!

Silkrooster
09-06-2004, 09:34 PM
I say if you want to learn to draw badly enough, then go for it. Everybody has an idea in their head on what an object should look like, but putting it on paper takes technique. Some people can draw with out thinking about it, others need to learn how to put their ideas down on paper. This technique is what you would be learning. And yes learning how to draw will help you in the CG field. If for nothing other than texturing. But I beleive that it will help train you to visualise objects better. The reverse can be true as well learning to do CG could help you to draw. Once you see how object relate to light and shadows and how textures play a big part in what makes up an object, you can then start to see how it should be drawn on paper.
Silk

riki
09-06-2004, 10:16 PM
I think you can learn but you need to apply yourself and build up confidence over a period of time.

adrian
09-06-2004, 11:15 PM
Well.... thanks for all the replies! Most encouraging.

I guess the reason for my lack of self-confidence when it comes to drawing relates back to childhood when I always told myself I couldn't draw, so maybe now is the time to let go of that belief and do an art class and see what happens.....

One of my reasons of wanting to draw is so I can create 2-d art in photoshop to go with my 3d renderings.... that would be so cool.

Adrian.

toonafish
09-07-2004, 05:04 AM
Most people that create great artwork are not neccesery the most talented ones, they are just spending more time and effort into their work then the rest. When people think they can't draw it's mostly because they spend an hour on a drawing without any preparation and then they are fed up with it. But most good artists work for days, weeks or sometimes months on a piece and spend lots of time on research, study and preparation.

Drawing is no magic, just like with anything you create or do. The more time you spend on it and the more you know about it the better the result. I always think of it as this little muscle in your brain that you can train just like any other muscle in you body. If you spend enough time on improving your skills you can become better then the greatest lazy talent I think.

But the most imprortant thing is to have fun drawing, otherwise you'll drop the ball in no time.

just my 2 cents.




Hi peoples,

Ok I have a question (well 2 actually): Whilst I can create artwork on the computer, when it comes to traditional drawing skills I absolutely suck with a capital S. I mean, there are no words in the English language that can describe how bad I am. I stuggle to draw stick men.

My question is this. Do you think it is possible for someone to learn how to draw? I don't mean become a Picasso or anything, but so I could draw something that would look reasonably good?

I really want to believe that I can learn to draw, but I have grown up with the idea that it is 99% inate as to whether someone can draw or not - like playing a musical instrument.

Secondly, do you think it helps to be a good traditional artist when doing CG? Personally the fact I have never been able to draw (and a lifetime of frustration because of it) has given me my passion for CG.

The reason I ask is that I am thinking of taking an art class but that annoying little voice inside my head says "ahh what's the point you can't draw!!!!!"

Looking forward to hearing people's thoughts....

Adrian.

NanoGator
09-07-2004, 11:02 AM
1.) Yes, you can learn to draw. That's the nice thing about art classes, they take you through the baby steps to get started. It takes persistence. You also gotta turn off that little voice that says you can't. You are the harshest judge of your own work.

2.) Yes, it is very helpful in 3D to have traditional drawing skills. My own modelling abilities have dramatically improved since working concept drawings into my work flow. Why? Composition is about lines, where they go, what they do, etc. Drawing is a nice clean way to generate those lines, but doing it in 3D isn't so easy. I always thought I could 'design in my head', but I changed my mind about that after going from paper to 3D.

If you can work things out so that you're designing with a pen, then moving from there to 3D, then you've always got a job opportunity no matter which app you use. Instead of learning how to 'be good' with an app, you're learning to translate your drawing to 3D. Life gets a lot easier that way. (Ask anybody that's started using ZBrush!)

pooby
09-07-2004, 11:14 AM
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0007116454/026-2366619-3622017

Buy this book.. Drawing on the right side of the brain..

I promise you. if you complete the course in the book, you will be able to draw very well.
It's unlike most books insofar as it's not a 'how to draw a face' type thing, it shows you how to observe and process what you see and convert that into images. It's quite scientific and it's proven.
It's no good to just practice without direction. There is no magic to drawing but there are some solid tried and tested rules to observation and putting that down on paper.
I have taken a few people through this book in the past and all have been amazed at what they have achieved.
It doesn't matter how crap you are to start with.

adrian
09-07-2004, 01:12 PM
Thanks Pooby for the link to that book. Just reading those reviews got me excited at the possibilities... needless to say I've placed my order. Right, where's that power-cut switch to the left side of my brain.....

Adrian.

Skonk
09-07-2004, 02:14 PM
Just been looking at the reviews of this book too and for the price i think i'l order it :)

Iv always sucked at drawing, tho both my dad and sister are very good. It's not like iv never been interesting in it too, but when ever iv tried to draw anything (even when i was young) iv instantly thought "well thats a pile of crap" and just given up, since i got into 3d a few years ago iv realised how much better i would be if i could draw, i have idea's but i can never get them into 3d since i cant even get them down on paper, even in a basic form.

I'l order the book and give it a go, its only 10 so it cant hurt :)

James..

adrian
09-07-2004, 03:08 PM
James,

Well you wouldn't believe the lengths I went to as a child to try and draw.

I tried copying drawings but the results were truly awful... I tried following a book my Grandmother used to have called "Let's draw...." - I had very limited success with this.

I used tracing paper but obviously people could tell I had just traced what I'd drawn. Then I had the good idea to put a piece of paper (or card) underneath a picture and draw over the lines of the actual picture with a sharp pencil, thus creating an indentation on the card underneath.

This worked well until you turned it over and you could see how I cheated, not to mention the ruined original picture!!

Of course, whether I used tracing paper or the "sharp pencil method" I always had the frustration of not being able to create my own worlds that I could see in my head but couldn't get down on paper.

Still, despite my limitations, in those days I spent hours and days drawing..... I guess art has always been in my blood, I just didn't realise it until I discovered CGI. Even at college when I was studying software engineering, if I was creating some code to make a circuit that I had built work, the first thing I would do is the graphics to make it look nice - I would worry whether I could get it to work later on!!

With the help of this book.... who knows? Even if it helps me become a better CG artist (like I said I would love to be able to create matte paintings in photoshop which I could use as backgrounds for 3D stuff) then I will be very excited! I'm hoping that my limitations are to some extent self-imposed (ie telling myself I can't draw for instance).

I would be interested in hearing your impression of the book when you start going through it - I will post my feedback here as well.

Adrian.

colkai
09-08-2004, 02:59 AM
Whilst I can create artwork on the computer, when it comes to traditional drawing skills I absolutely suck with a capital S. I mean, there are no words in the English language that can describe how bad I am. I stuggle to draw stick men.

Adrian.

Hi Adrian, welcome to my world ;)
The worst thing is, my wife is a 'natural' artist, born with it, Grrr :p
I just keep trying, I'm not proud, I even buy kiddies art books to try and get a start. No good going for the "adult" learn to draw, to a one, they all assume you are pretty good to start with.
The only book I would suggest you invest in is "drawing with the right hand side of the brain"
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0874774195/qid=1094633744/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/102-0176895-2356150?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

It is good for showing that anyone CAN actually draw, just need to get past some boundaries is all. I haven't had time to go thorugh the exercises yet, but just reading it is good.

One thing I'd suggest is doing a basic drawing, (yeah it will suck I know), then do a LW 3D version, set up the angle to be the same and start to look at where you went wrong. I'm doing that at the moment and it does help.

If you're like me, your brain may be more "technical", which can be frustrating, but don't let it stop you. I know even if I never get past 'sucks less' style drawing, it will be an improvement, and like everything else, the more you do, the better you start to see / understand.

Cheers from a fellow sufferer. :D

EDIT: I REALLY should read the whole thread before replying LOL!
This book really is the thing to help you learn, if nothing else, it can give your confidence a boost so you actually get started. The rave reviews, in my opinion, are more than justified. Good Luck!

pooby
09-10-2004, 02:10 AM
Hi Adrian..

I'm really pleased that you're getting the book I recommended.

I'd be really interested in seeing your progress. It helps to have someone to show your work to and get feedback

Poobs

adrian
09-10-2004, 10:29 AM
Hi Pooby,

Yes I'll certainly post my results here. Actually I was looking at some woman's digital paintings on cgchannel the other day and I wrote to her complimenting her work and she recommends this book too.

I also went to that link that has the book "Fun with a pencil" online and I did the first exercise drawing that cartoon face.

For the first time in my life (and at the first attempt) I actually managed to recreate it. The attempt was so good I could actually look at it with a wry smile and say to myself "Hey, that's not bad!"

This is a very, very big deal for me. In fact to coin - and slightly alter - a very famous phrase: "This is one small step for me.... but one giant step for my belief system".

I think the key is to have a playful attitute rather than concentrate on what I "can't" do.

Adrian.

colkai
09-10-2004, 11:13 AM
I think the key is to have a playful attitute rather than concentrate on what I "can't" do.

That's the trick really.
When ever I can stop worrying about if I can do something, or tell myself it ISN'T impossible and I will get it if I just keep at it, I find myself surprised at what I can do.

Always allow yourself to be surprised by your own abilities. :D

Carbon71
09-10-2004, 01:46 PM
Just my $.02 worth:

You question has been a central one of mine. Try this: Look at the work of the digital artists you like. What's their schooling background? I like 3d artists like Policarpo and Proton who both have traditional art schooling. I found this to be true of almost all of the digital artists that I personally like. It's like there is some invisible thing in there, some sense of aesthetics or composition or design that makes it better. Whatever that thing is, I want it.
Also I just don't think I can handle calling myself artist (even digital) and not be able to draw. It seems the fundamentally important to me. I'm in my second drawing class now. It really does change the way you see. Within a year I'm quitting my job to go to art school.

Carbon

colkai
09-10-2004, 02:30 PM
Also I just don't think I can handle calling myself artist (even digital) and not be able to draw. It seems the fundamentally important to me.

There is no denying being able to draw is great, but I don't think one should worry too much about being an "artist". I tend to think of myself simply as creative, if I ever learn to draw worth a bean, fine, if not, well, not a life problem really.

I do think if you understand lighting and texturing and have an eye for whta makes a good composition, you have plenty of tools at your disposal to be good at your game. There are lots of folks out there who have excellent skills in drawing, but their compositions lack life and character. By the same token, there are the most basic characters that show real life and attitude, even from something as simply as a walking box.

Don't get me wrong though, my wife is a "natural" with paint / pastel / pencil - and I am in awe of the stuff she does.

Skonk
09-11-2004, 05:28 PM
Well i got the book (i also got the work book too, its kinda like a sketch book with some printed pages, descriptions of what you should do for each example and a space for you to draw on, though i havn't actually drawn on it, just placed my drawing pad by the side of it and used that) and so far im enjoying it, i only started reading it today, not got very far into it but im doing the exercises and trying to follow it as closely as i can (even tho i did feel like a plonker staring into a mirror drawing a self portrait :) ), weather or not it makes my drawing skills (or lack of) any better is yet to be seen but its quite fun either way (i must say, after just finnishing a drawing of my hand and doing some shading etc.. i am pleasently supprised with the results).
I noticed that when ever the image didn't look right i was very tempted to just give in (and would have in the past), but i forced myself to just keep going, erase parts needed and eventually i will look right.

Actually something i did find amusing was that after i drew the image of myself (your asked to draw a self portrait before u actually have any tuition), i was supprised that the image did actually look like me (if i showed it to a friend im sure they would be able to tell its me), iv never actually tried drawing my own face (or anyone elses for that matter), always assumed it would look nothing like me anyway so why bother :) so it makes you think, if i did try to draw someone else i guess i would be able to get a likeness, although it would still look quite crap it would be better than expected.

Its also nice that throughout the book you're shown examples of other students work, you'l see some examples of the self portraits, both before and after tuition and examples of completed exercises, and generally iv found that my drawing looks about the same level as the examples in the book, very reassuring.

If anyone else has got the book after reading this thread it'd be nice to hear your thoughts too :)

James..

lede
09-11-2004, 05:36 PM
I've ordered it and now I'm waiting for Snail-Mail to deliver it. The book really sound interesting and I can attest that when I draw out my work before modeling I get better models. Besides you can never have enough reference materials when modeling :D

-Lee

adrian
09-12-2004, 12:26 AM
I found this site:

http://www.drawright.com/

If you go to the gallery section, you can see examples of before and after attempts by people.

My drawing skills equate to the first example on the top left. I have to say I'm staggered at the difference in the "after" attempt.

Adrian.

colkai
09-12-2004, 03:33 AM
It is scary isn't it?
When I get the time, (hah!) I intend to sit down with this book "properly", even so, just reading it and thinking about what you've read can make a difference in how you approach attempting something. :)

ericsmith
09-12-2004, 11:19 AM
Here's a slightly different take on this subject:

One of the amazing features of the human brain is its ability to take in data and fill in the missing gaps. I could draw a single gestural curve, and someone else could look at it and say, "that's a person". Our minds interpret what we see, and then fill in the gaps to decide what is there. Unfortunately, this ability, along with years of biasing, can make us decide what something looks like without really seeing what is truly there. The "Drawing from the right side of the brain" concept helps to overcome this problem by forcing the drawer to isolate specific areas and just duplicate them, instead of trying to take in an entire scene and draw what the brain tells us is there.

So what it comes down to is this: There are a lot of specific techniques related to drawing that someone can learn, but what is really important is the ability to look, and see what is truly there. To turn off the part of the brain that tries to fill in the gaps and tell you what it thinks is there, simply because that's what it has been taught is supposed to be there.

And this skill will definitely help with modeling. Many of the great artists used to dissect cadavers to truly understand the human form. Similar to this, every artist needs to constantly break down everything they see, and get to the truth of form and structure. The more an artist really understands how things really are, the easier it is for them to re-create the world around them, either in 2d or 3d.

Eric

pauland
09-12-2004, 12:08 PM
And this skill will definitely help with modeling. Many of the great artists used to dissect cadavers to truly understand the human form.

I've just formed an image of a LW artist dressed as Vincent Price, pouring wax onto his innocent victims so they can be modelled realistically..


;-)

Paul

adrian
10-16-2004, 01:18 PM
Well it's been a while since I started this thread and I thought it was time to share my experiences so far of "Drawing on the right side of the brain".

BTW I also bought the custom-made portfolio that she (Betty Edwards) also sells. It was quite a lot of money but worth it.

First of all I have to say I love the way the book actually goes into detail as to why certain people "can't" draw and why others can.

Anyway I'm only up to page 64 right now, but already I can share two pieces of work. Picture one is what I tried to draw before starting to read the book. I'm sure this will leave you all in no doubt that I am completely talentless when it comes to traditional art.

Picture two is my attempt at re-creating a drawing shown in the book during one of the exercises. It's still not very good, but for me quite frankly is an absolute miracle. As I come back to look at the picture I like it more and more.

One thing is interesting in my experience is that, when I draw, my (left) brain is desperately trying to hold onto the belief that I cannot draw as I often feel frustrated whilst going through the exercises. Hopefully this will diminish the more I draw....

Adrian.

adrian
10-16-2004, 01:19 PM
... and now for my masterpiece... soon I will change my name by deed poll to Picasso!

Adrian.

pauland
10-16-2004, 02:30 PM
Excellent. Thanks for sharing that with us, I'm so pleased you're doing so well.

An artist is born.

Paul

pooby
10-16-2004, 04:12 PM
That's shows real improvement..
Learning to copy drawings is an important step to drawing from reality.

Don't ever think you can't do it.. it's precisely THOSE thoughts that will be a stumbling block.
There's a lot less mystery to drawing than people think. Thats book pulls the curtain back.

I hope you stick with it...it's obviously working.. I'd love to see some stuff you've drawn from life later.

lardbros
10-17-2004, 03:34 PM
Must admit, im impressed!! :D I always used to think that you're born with artistic skills but after reading a book on mind mapping, anything is possible for absolutely anyone. Luckily my mum's a graphic designer, dad's an architect, sister is a fine artist and my brother is a product designer lmao... but all i wanted to be good at at school was science!! Nothing is ever how you want it.

Keep up the great work!

nemac4
10-17-2004, 05:44 PM
I've been reading the book for a while now and trying to do the exercises. I have some "natural" skill but found that the book has been very helpful anyway.

Here is my before sketch: http://www.nemac4.com/2dimages/self_portrait.jpg

I've not done another yet. But even so,.. I can see a lot of problems with this sketch.

As far as life drawing, the thing that Ive found most helpful has been studying anatomy. Just knowing more about muscles and bones made a huge difference for me. Quick sketches are so much easier too.
http://www.nemac4.com/2dimages/joe.jpg

adrian
10-18-2004, 12:16 AM
Well all I can say is that your self-portrait is light years ahead of mine. Judging by that pic, you don't have "some" natural talent, you have lots - after reading the book you're going to be awesome.

As for mind mapping, I never got the hang of that although a friend of mine who is a life coach says it's very powerful.

Adrian.

Nemoid
10-18-2004, 06:00 AM
some drawing for u. :) lerning to draw is possible, but great practice to train the hand and the eye is still required. the more u draw the more u feel confident with your skills too.
incidentally, no photos were used to make the drawing.

Nemoid
10-18-2004, 06:11 AM
here's a char i designed for a sci fi project i have to do in comic book style. scanned drawing and coloured with some little photoshop. Fun! ;)

Trawler
10-18-2004, 09:19 AM
I've been drawing and painting and the like since I was two years old. But that doesn't mean I'm any Rembrandt or Michelangelo. Their styles were their own.

adrian wrote : "One thing is interesting in my experience is that, when I draw, my (left) brain is desperately trying to hold onto the belief that I cannot draw as I often feel frustrated whilst going through the exercises. Hopefully this will diminish the more I draw.... "

I think you're on to something. The more you draw, the more comfortable you'll be with it.

But IMHO, everyone can draw, it's just that not everyone readily accepts their own style. The trick is to accept your style and cultivate it. Your style is like no one elses. Accept it, embrace it, cultivate it, and keep on practicing!! :D

adrian
10-18-2004, 10:40 AM
Very nice drawings Nemoid.

As for practising, well I will be without my computer for a couple of weeks as I'm having a new capture card fitted (with new system) so I will have plenty of time to practice every day - at least it will take my mind off not having Lightwave to play with!

Adrian.

Nemoid
10-18-2004, 02:32 PM
Thanx adrian. i like to draw very much. it's natural for me, so i really can't exactly understand why some people can't draw . but i'll tell u something. i really learnt drawing by myself. it's a matter of interest in drawing itself.

At a certain point of my life in wich i desired to improve alot i drew for hours a day every day. not all drawings were so good indeed : did alot of baad drawings but I learned from my errors alot.

Took art classes when i was just at a good point in drawing by myself, basically to get better and refine my art culture, and have the possibility to draw from real anatomy and nce naked girls too :D

I also took good inspiration from all people out there, even those wich were not so able in drawing.

I read good manuals and books to refine my knowledge : for example Burne Hogarth's books about anatomy, and loomis ones i found on the web.

all the rest is personal training. Also copying other people's works wich is a primary exercise.

Even Picasso did it alot during his whole life so why couldn't we do this as well?

archiea
10-28-2004, 01:09 AM
..... And yes learning how to draw will help you in the CG field. If for nothing other than texturing. But I beleive that it will help train you to visualise objects better. The reverse can be true as well learning to do CG could help you to draw. Once you see how object relate to light and shadows and how textures play a big part in what makes up an object, you can then start to see how it should be drawn on paper.
Silk

Ish, I disagree here... drawing and paint help with a broad range of observation skill that translate into more than just a literal comparison like texturing.

Also, part of the problem of what you sugested with seeing how an object relates to light and shadow is limited. Specificaly in that its not real. I find little use in, say, learning CG lighting and applying that to live action. Perhaps youmean as a previs tool, then yes it can be equated to a 3D sketch of an idea (camera move, composition of a shot, etc..)

Rory_L
10-28-2004, 10:35 PM
Hi Adrian,

As mentioned above, observational drawing is difficult because your brain is busy overriding what your eyes are telling you. A trick to get around this is to draw what you see in a mirror, where the real world scene is flipped in the vertical. This way your brain can`t so easily tell what`s what and is more prepared to listen to what your eyes are saying!

My vote is for solid 2D skills practise. There`s no down side, only huge benefits.

Good luck!

R

adrian
10-29-2004, 10:59 AM
Cheers Rory. I am continuing on with the exercises in the book and on the video. I have now progressed beyond "upside down drawing" and using the viewfinders to draw right side up.

I am noticing that my left brain is beginning to help rather than hinder (only fleeting glimpses at the moment but definately a step in the right direction).

Instead of saying "this is rubbish.... what a waste of time" the voice inside my head now says "look at how the edges intersect.... look at how the shadows blend in and out...."

I've also taken to listening to a Beethoven CD whilst drawing (don't laugh!) - this really does help in quieting the L-brain down.

I will post more drawings as I progress. I'm currently in the process of copying a picture of Gollum.

Adrian.

Nemoid
10-29-2004, 12:23 PM
great. observing and copying are really important for learning to draw. if u want to "calm down" even better just copy great masters of painting drawings u will ask yourself how did they reach to draw so well but you'll get so involved on drawing that surely u will learn alot not only about shapes,and how to draw them in space but also about stroke and personality in drawing. :)

u will also learn a good sense of taste.

BaseZero
11-17-2004, 09:57 PM
... and now for my masterpiece... soon I will change my name by deed poll to Picasso!

Adrian.I have to say that the second drawing shows an incredible degree of progress, congratulations and keep up the fabulous work!

LWnexgen
11-23-2004, 07:46 AM
I'm kinda in the same boat as adrian.

I'm really good with a computer, but I don't really have much in the way of traditional art skills. It really sucks because I'm trying to find a college that would offer a degree in 3D animation that wouldn't require much skill with pen and paper.

Oh well, for now it'll just be a cool hobby.

adrian
11-23-2004, 10:10 AM
Well it really depends on how much you want to turn pro. If you're prepared to put in the effort with this book/video then you will be a good artist - certainly good enough to get into any college.

What I'm finding tough right now is the discipline to actually sit down and draw because now I have my new computer system I can't stop using LightWave and my fantastic new Matrox capture card!!!!!!!!!!!

Adrian.