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firstsingle
07-08-2004, 06:27 AM
Hey guys. This is a question I've been wanting to ask for some time.
I'm 31. I purchased my first computer at age 29.
Power Mac G4.
Running: Lightwave,Mirage,RealViz Bundle, and a few others.

How is Ram used by software?
Is it stored in ram, or is ram used when a program is launched?
I have 768mb of ram now. I plan on buying more soon but, I just want to understand how it works. I think I understand the video card thingy now but, feel free to explain how that works also.

I have a PC also but only 256mg ram on it. I run 'Synth Eyes' , Lightwave and Mirage on it. Synth Eyes seems to run pretty slow on it. Maybe because of video footage. I wish I could run everything on my Mac.

Thanks in advance guys.

gazmon
07-08-2004, 06:39 AM
As far as i understand RaM is used by the program once it is launched. It is used to keep bits of info in while you are using the programme to speed things up. Video Ram stores whats displayed on screen and keeps info in it in asimilar way to speed things up.
The best thing to speed up rendering is a fast processor. But a good supply of Ram is really useful for big projects so the computer doesnt have to use the hard disk which is much slower.
Gaz

firstsingle
07-08-2004, 06:54 AM
Perfect Gaz.
I understand now. Thanks Bro.
LATER!

Lightwolf
07-08-2004, 07:41 AM
Originally posted by firstsingle
I have a PC also but only 256mg ram on it.
...
Synth Eyes seems to run pretty slow on it. Maybe because of video footage. I wish I could run everything on my Mac.

There are a couple of things to note with Syntheyes...

a) it needs a fast hard rive to pull the frames from... fast.
b) it tries to keep as many images as possible in RAM, so the more RAM, the faster it gets. I run it on a 2BG machine and, hey I can even keep 150 frames of 2K footage in memory which makes working with SynthEyes very pleasant indeed.
c) it also depends on the speed of your CPU of course.

You PC should have a minimum of 512MB for Syntheyes to work decently (i.e. -> longer sequences, less loading, more fun :)).

Cheers,
Mike

firstsingle
07-08-2004, 08:11 AM
Hey thanks Lightwolf. Your PC system sounds like a delight to run. After this project I'm gonna invest in my PC. I forgot Synth Eyes needs 512mb to run decently. There's my problem.
My PC is also only a Dell 933MHZ also.
Never thought I'd have to use it truthfully.
LATER!

Lightwolf
07-08-2004, 08:33 AM
Originally posted by firstsingle
Hey thanks Lightwolf. Your PC system sounds like a delight to run. After this project I'm gonna invest in my PC. I forgot Synth Eyes needs 512mb to run decently. There's my problem.
My PC is also only a Dell 933MHZ also.
Never thought I'd have to use it truthfully.
LATER!
It is a delight, but I've only had it for 2 weeks now, so I'm still really enjoying it :)
I worked on a dual P3 700 before, 916MB, and SynthEyes behaved quite well on that as well. It does like RAM a lot it seems :)

Cheers,
Mike

firstsingle
07-08-2004, 12:34 PM
Hey LightWolf. I've had Synth eyes about 2 months now. I'm ready to get the old pc a tune up. You've got me amped now!

gazmon
07-08-2004, 12:42 PM
Originally posted by firstsingle
Perfect Gaz.
I understand now. Thanks Bro.
LATER!
No problems mate!
Gaz

dwburman
07-08-2004, 03:14 PM
Hey, here's an analogy I've worked up for computer stuff. I'm not an engineer or anything so this might be a little off.

Think of your computer as a kitchen.

Your drawers, cupboards and refridgerator are like the hard drives. They store the data and the applications.

Your appliances are your applications, or software.

The food or ingredients are the data.

The countertop is your RAM. If you're working on something small like a bowl of cereal or a cheese sandwich (email, looking at pictures, etc) a small countertop will be fine. if you want to work on more complex or larger dishes you need space to layout and prepare your ingredients. Picture trying to cater a meal for 150 people in a small apartment (flat) kitchen as compared to a proper restaurant kitchen. In the small space you'd have to move stuff around in order to make space to work on diferent parts of the meal. You may even have to put some things back into the cupboards in order to clear your working area and then pull that stuff out of the cupboards to finish working on that. It's like that with RAM. If there isn't enough RAM the computer has to temporarily store data on the Hard Drive and pull it back out again causing a huge slow down.

It sounds like you already understand what you need to know about this. I just like to share my analogy :)

firstsingle
07-08-2004, 05:13 PM
dwburman:
That was hotttt man. I like that.
Easy to grasp. You should teach

dwburman
07-11-2004, 10:24 PM
Thanks. Teaching is something that I might get into in the future. I don't quite feel like it right now ;)


Originally posted by firstsingle
dwburman:
That was hotttt man. I like that.
Easy to grasp. You should teach

firstsingle
07-12-2004, 08:56 AM
Originally posted by dwburman
Thanks. Teaching is something that I might get into in the future. I don't quite feel like it right now ;)

Knarly!