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MH9
07-07-2004, 08:30 PM
Any word on Newtek's developing a 64bit Screamernet for 64bit Linux systems? And any thoughts on the performance gains that would be acheived?

This would be lovely, no?

Kind regards,
Micah
S9 Design

Lightwolf
07-08-2004, 03:49 AM
Originally posted by MH9
Any word on Newtek's developing a 64bit Screamernet for 64bit Linux systems? And any thoughts on the performance gains that would be acheived?

I have no idea of what they're doing.
At the best you can squeeze +15% out of it on an Opteron, it might run slower on once of those new intel chips.
the main drawback is that the current 64bit compilers don't produce as fast a code as the current 32bit compiler used by NT for LW, so you might end up seeing hardly any performance gains (which isn't the point of 64bit in the first place).

Cheers,
Mike

MH9
07-08-2004, 03:17 PM
Thanks Lightwolf. I hadn't know that the compilters would even be a factor.

This is a complete tangent and pehaps more demanding than it's worth, but what does 64bit mean for consumers then; what's the benefit, especially for 3D CG community?

Kind regards,
Micah
S9 Design

Lightwolf
07-09-2004, 02:47 AM
Originally posted by MH9
Thanks Lightwolf. I hadn't know that the compilters would even be a factor.

This is a complete tangent and pehaps more demanding than it's worth, but what does 64bit mean for consumers then; what's the benefit, especially for 3D CG community?

Compilers are more and more of a factor right now, as processors and the data paths within get more complex. As a prime example, look at the Itanium, which is completely compiler dependant for decent running code.

Mind you, the Opteron actually allows for faster code in 64bit due to instruction set extensions (which is not true for non x86-64 based CPUs, like the G5, which has basically the same instruction set in both worlds), but there has to yet come a compiler that takes advantage of that and makes it run faster than the fastest 32bit code.

64bit means pretty much zilch for consumers at the moment. The main reason for it is memory usage beyond 2/3 GB per app, and while this can benefit 3D (huge textures), there are probably more efficient ways to handle large scenes than to just bump up the memory requirements.
The main application where I would see 64bit of being of real use right now is compositing. Large RAM caches, especially if you work in film, make life so much easier for you.
Commercially databases are the main beneficiares of 64bit computing at the moment, as well as some large scale scientific computing projects with huge data sets.

Cheers,
Mike - don't believe the hype ;)

MH9
07-09-2004, 11:04 AM
Interesting.
Thanks, Mike!

Kind regards,
Micah
S9 Design