PDA

View Full Version : Lightwave modeling isn't as easy as it looks



Jamel
06-29-2004, 03:28 PM
I think i got the animating part under control but modeling is can be so difficult at times like i want to create a character from head to toe but. there are so many steps a beginner would know of the bat(like do u model a char. in one shot or parts an peices). like i would follow a simple head modeling tut then they would skip to subdividng a box then i would get lost, they dont go into detail sooo .... how can beginners follow or do they just asume we know, an unfortunatly lightwave 8 doesnt come with a manual so it's even more difficult. :confused:

I ordered Dan's book inside lightwave 8 so im hoping that book can teach me the ropes.

my question is how did many of u veterans learn the basics of modeling?

bloontz
06-29-2004, 03:47 PM
You learn by making models but a full figure human isn't an easy place to start. Here is a tut - http://cal.jmu.edu/ratner/tutorials/

Dan's book should help a lot but his earlier Inside LW books only covered the head. I imagine this one is similar.

colkai
06-30-2004, 06:13 AM
Originally posted by Jamel
my question is how did many of u veterans learn the basics of modeling?

I'd bet, every single one of 'em.
You really can't expect to create a human from scratch as your first foray in the world of modelling. Learn how to do the basics, so you can you the tools automatically.
Build simple objects first, patience... :)

gazmon
06-30-2004, 06:17 AM
yep definitely learn the basics and the tools of modelling. As you gain confidence you'll find your own way of working and putting things together. I got LW 7 with 10 free DVD tutorials - went through them and just played around adapting the tutorials and ploughed through loadsa tutorials on the web. One tutorial wont tell ya everything but then you'll find another one which will make you go "aah so thats how it works!".
It takes time but I think everyone will say they are still discovering new ways of doing things!
I got Dans book too and found it very good!
Good luck and have fun!
Gaz

Matt
06-30-2004, 09:03 AM
Going through the tools one by one to understand their function helps - then move on to tutorials that utilise modelling 'techniques'; some are suited to different types of modelling (basically organic objects vs mechanical/architectural objects).

Finding your own style takes time.

Keep the learning process challenging; but not un-realistic - that way you'll learn quickly but with a sense of achievement rather than dissappointment when it all goes wrong!

:)

art_DA
06-30-2004, 11:49 AM
Hey Jamel,

Hang in there buddy. I know exactly what you mean.
It's tough to learn a new 3D program, especially when your used to another one like I was and it's not ANYTHING like LW8.
You also have to learn a slew of other programs at the same time, so time is NOT on your side.
Plus, they'll give me a project I have absolutely no idea how to pull off, but their response is "learn it" or "that's not my problem".
Sometimes, you HAVE to model or animate something most veterans would find daunting, right off the bat because it's demanded of you.
Today I have a 14 hour shooting day, so I will not be "studying" my Lightwave and DFX+, and Avid editing software, and the new medium format camera, and the new video camera and the new audio software.
But, I just keep plugging. One needs to put bread on the table afterall.

Art

mattclary
06-30-2004, 01:57 PM
Practice, practice, practice. I've been using LightWave for 3-4 years now and I still suck. I just don't dedicate the time to it like I should. I get frustrated and have little patience.

Tom Wood
06-30-2004, 02:29 PM
I've been at it for only 10 months and I've been able to get done what I wanted. I think it helps to have a narrowly defined goal in mind so you can concentrate on a few features at a time. I set aside all the particle effects at first because it was just too much. But now that I have the basics down, I was able to do a credible job with FX Linker for a short animation.

I spent a lot of time just trying out different 'looks' and then had to set a lot of it aside and try something else. My guiding mantra from the start was KISS it, so I haven't ventured into the deepest waters.

I should probably make a new tab and collect the handful of tools that I use under one place, but I haven't bothered to learn that yet either. :rolleyes:

TW

PS: I also learned Mirage, Particle Illusions, Wavelab, ACID and VT3 during this time too. I recently started a new version of my project and it sure feels good knowing what to do, most of the time. Keep good notes when you discover something that you know you will use again, and especially keep notes of anything not documented that you learn here or from tech support.

colkai
06-30-2004, 02:36 PM
Originally posted by mattclary
Practice, practice, practice. I've been using LightWave for 3-4 years now and I still suck. I just don't dedicate the time to it like I should. I get frustrated and have little patience.

I hear ya brother, loud N clear! ;)
Same here, I just don't get the time I want to put into LW. Life, it has a habit of happening. :p

harlan
06-30-2004, 02:49 PM
Hehehe...I know the feeling. I've been using LightWave since the Videoscape 3D (or whatever the hell it was called back then) days, and everytime I look at the galleries I'm reminded of the fact that I'm the suckiest of the suckies.

Keep working at it...you'll get it, but don't ever look at the galleries if you want to keep your ego. ;)

harlan

***EDIT*** - I added the word "days" as I forgot to include it in the original post.

hrgiger
06-30-2004, 04:27 PM
You'll get it after a while, but you have to get the bad modeling out of you first. The more crap you make though, the worse you'll start to feel about it, and one day you'll realize that you're not that bad after all...I was told in art school that every one has a million bad drawings in them, you just have to get rid of them as soon as you can..... Don't fret over what you make now, just keep moving onto the next modeling excercise. A tutorial, even one that goes into great detail is only so helpful, you'll only get good at modeling once you can start seeing the forms you are trying to make in your head and actually start seeing the world around you in wireframes....

Doran
06-30-2004, 10:22 PM
I'll second the start small advice. If you want to work on anatomy, do a finger... then a thumb.. then try the whole hand. Use good observation skills and then practise until you are blurry eyed.

Don't be afraid to walk away from a model for a week either (unless you are under a deadline..) sometimes a fresh perspective helps.

Trawler
06-30-2004, 10:45 PM
Originally posted by hrgiger
I was told in art school that every one has a million bad drawings in them, you just have to get rid of them as soon as you can.....

I remember hearing this too in art classes. I've only had LW a couple of months and my goal has been to make as many crappy models using as many of the tools as possible. And I have to say, it's beginnig to help. Hey, I still suck, but at least am having fun, and I think I'm getting better. :rolleyes:

Hoopti
06-30-2004, 11:44 PM
When I first started messing in 3d work, I'd just jump right inot the program and try to create something. In the end, I usually wasn't really happy with it.

First thing I'd do is to take out a piece of paper, and just sketch out what you're thinking of creating. It doesn't have to be fancy, or detailed (although the more detail the better), and it doesn't have to be good. I'm a terrible pen and ink artist. but I get my idea out there so I know what I'm going to try to build.

Do I freeform once I start based on my drawing? Heckyeah. But at least I know what I want at the end.

Hope that helps.

Hoop