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red fox
05-04-2004, 03:32 AM
I was just looking though a lot of the galleries on the web, and was wondering how these people get there graphics so life like. I have tried to get my models as real looking as possible but am finding it extremely long winded and difficult naming textures ect....and still end up with a scene/model that looks completely CG.
Do these people use other programs as well as light wave to fine tune there graphics? I do have other software e.g. Bodypaint 3D & adobe Premier but have as of yet not used them?

mattclary
05-04-2004, 06:04 AM
Lots and LOTS of practice. It is not an endeavor for people with little patience. That's my problem, I get impatient, thus continue to suck.

mkiii
05-04-2004, 06:12 AM
Even after lots & lots of practice, it is still extremely long winded & difficult, and that goes for whatever app you are using.

You do learn shortcuts, but the basic fact is that you have to put the time in on the detailing no matter how good you are.

If you have more than one app, or paint program, then use them all to get the effect you need.

red fox
05-04-2004, 09:55 AM
Uummmm, I find painting and texturing so difficult and long winded that putting in the fine detail must be made easier, it must take months for a descent model.
So the general view is stick with Light wave. And not a 2nd application for colour & texturing

Cageman
05-04-2004, 11:37 AM
Lighting is as important as texturing and modeling.

Kurtis
05-04-2004, 02:02 PM
Red Fox,

You might want to post a render or two, so others can give you pointers on specific things you can work on to improve.

mkiii
05-04-2004, 08:04 PM
Originally posted by red fox
Uummmm, I find painting and texturing so difficult and long winded that putting in the fine detail must be made easier, it must take months for a descent model.
So the general view is stick with Light wave. And not a 2nd application for colour & texturing

Ermmm... You are going to have a hard time if you try creating texture maps without a paint program of some sort. I think the general consensus was to use whatever tools you have to hand coupled with lots of practice.

You might get good at painting textures - practice makes perfect eh?

marlo.steed
05-04-2004, 08:48 PM
Sometimes, not always - a good digital camera works well for realistic textures. Take a picture of the desired texture then work it over in a paint program. The hardcore proceduralists would think is is sacriledge.

TripD
05-09-2004, 08:39 PM
> Lighting is as important as texturing and modeling

Yah, I've realised that even when I have a pretty sharp looking model, it's the ultimate presentation (lighting, etal) that makes or breaks the work. On top of all the things in Layout I still need to learn, I am now taking traditional art classes. Basically, I am biting a huge bullet and going straight back to basics.

Anyone have a sh*t load of patience they can loan me???

Cageman
05-10-2004, 12:50 AM
Originally posted by TripD
Anyone have a sh*t load of patience they can loan me???

Hehe... no way! ;)

When it comes to lighting and texturing a scene, FPrime (Worley (http://www.worley.com/fprime.html)) seems to be a HUGE timesaver. If you have the money, go for it!

:)