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View Full Version : Will aborting scene render break my movie?



modent
02-27-2004, 12:22 PM
I have a quick question. I have a scene that I have been rendering for two days now. It is rendering as quicktime with animation codec. I wanted to stop the rendering tonight so I could play some UT2004. Is it possible to stop the render without loosing the the partial movie file?

marble_sheep
02-27-2004, 12:25 PM
Yes... just remember to name it something else when you start again! That's why it's always better to render to image sequences.

(And isn't UT2004 freakin' ADDICTIVE??)

modent
02-27-2004, 02:12 PM
I guess I will have to wait a while linger to frag


I shall use "image sequence" in the future.


Thanks for the info.

kmscottmoore
02-27-2004, 03:18 PM
It is too late for this render. However, in the future, it is usually good practice to render your animations as an image sequence. That way, if Lightwave crashes, the machine freezes up, the power goes out, or whatever other unforseen disaster occurs, you only have to start at the point of catastrophe.

You can also apply Photoshop batch actions to your image sequence.

I use Quicktime Pro (a bargain at $30) to load and save the image sequence. If you load that file into Final Cut, it will automatically recognize the alpha channel, as well. A
good time saver for compositing.

BeeVee
03-02-2004, 06:30 AM
You can composite your frames into an animation directly in LightWave. Here's how:

1. Check the size of your image frame - let's say it's 640x480;
2. Start an empty scene. Load your image sequence in Image Editor, remember you may have to tell it you are loading a sequence rather than a single image;
3. Make this sequence your camera backdrop. If you wish to see how the animation looks, switch to camera view and make sure that camera view background in Display options is set to Background image. You will see your sequence and you can scrub through it;
4. Set your camera resolution to match the background image (if you want to - there's nothing to stop you from setting it lower or higher);
5. Go into render options and save an animation;
6. hit F10, but don't go on a round the world cruise or anything, it won't take long to render.

B

moubctez
03-02-2004, 06:38 AM
By the way, I noticed if you abort batch render in LWSN with a scene with particles, and then re-start, let's say in the middle of the scene, the particles will be restarted as well. Thanks heaven, it is not true for LightWave renderer.

Also, last time I tried, the wave procedural texture in LWSN was not in sync with LightWave.

If someone knows if this has been fixed, please stand up. ;)

mlinde
03-02-2004, 09:08 AM
Originally posted by moubctez
By the way, I noticed if you abort batch render in LWSN with a scene with particles, and then re-start, let's say in the middle of the scene, the particles will be restarted as well. Thanks heaven, it is not true for LightWave renderer. If you save your particles this doesn't happen. Been that way for a long time, because the particle path data is external from the actual scene file.

modent
03-02-2004, 10:12 AM
I let it render as advised. It is now 95% complete from 5 days of rendering on a G5 dulie. I either must be getting more advanced or doing something seriously wrong ;) Again, Thanks for all the help.

Dodgy
03-02-2004, 04:34 PM
I seem to remember the last time I stopped rendering halfway through, (outputting to a quicktime) the movie was still okay, which is why I always render to QT now. I used the mpeg-4 codec, I don't know whether that makes a difference or not (Isn't mpeg a delta based file, so incomplete mpegs still play okay?)

toby
03-02-2004, 08:33 PM
As I recall ever since 6.5 it's been cool to stop the render and still have a playable QT - but I render to frames anyway -

jdavidbakr
03-04-2004, 03:56 PM
Originally posted by toby
As I recall ever since 6.5 it's been cool to stop the render and still have a playable QT - but I render to frames anyway -
Not to mention in the (unfortunately) likely scenario where one of your frames renders wrong, you can go back and re-render that one frame without having to do a bunch of editing.

toby
03-04-2004, 09:13 PM
and have each frame numbered for you -

and open the sequence at any frame rate you want -

we need to compile a complete list of the good reasons for frames

RUdiger
03-04-2004, 11:23 PM
1 more very good reason:
Choosing an animation comprsses your renders, often with a lossy codec. If you render high quality, then trash your only version with compression, you waste alot of time. If your goal is a compressed movie, then you still would benefit from compressing the frames with different codec settings, rather than being stuck with the one that trashed your frames as you rendered them.