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Johnny
02-23-2004, 11:18 AM
I realize that not all 3D projects are the same, but I feel that I've been spending a lot of time rendering, fixing, re-rendering, over and over to try to get the vision in my head to reality.

I am making progress, but I'm starting to feel guilty that I may have spun my wheels here and there..could have used my renders more effectively, etc. Plus, I think what if I were doing this for a client? They might get impatient and wonder where their movie is!

Any thoughts on how to efficiently progress a piece of work like this? Just a matter of experience? Or, are there tried-and-true steps that we all need to follow to ensure effective, efficient development of our projects?

J

mattclary
02-23-2004, 11:21 AM
Sounds like you need F Prime! :cool:

Johnny
02-23-2004, 11:33 AM
Originally posted by mattclary
Sounds like you need F Prime! :cool:

F Prime? Sounds like either a good Scotch, or some 3D tool?

J

Axis3d
02-23-2004, 11:51 AM
I try and streamline as much as the process by working with lo-rez standin models in layout. I make sure that I can hit the play button in lightwave and that it runs in real time. If I have to constantly make previews, that wastes more time. When that is done, then I just replace the objects with their hi-rez versions for rendering.

When I need to render the action out to test for timing, I use the quickshade mode with the standin objects. It renders extremely fast and I can put the shots into Premiere or After FX to start editing them together. This way, I don't have to wait around for renderings.

When doing test renderings in full rez, for surfacing or lighting, try using the Limited Region. Draw a box around the really important area of the object you are rendering and this will save you from having to render the full frame every time.

Cutting small corners at every step can help save a tremendous amount of time in the end.

Johnny
02-23-2004, 11:54 AM
Originally posted by Axis3d
I try and streamline as much as the process by working with lo-rez standin models in layout.

that's pretty clever...how to actually do this, tho?
do you make your full-rez model, then make a lo-rez copy of it?? How do reduce the smoothness of a smooth model?

Plus, if you add, replace, or move an item in a model, then you'd have to make another lo-rez version, right?

I'm going to employ that method!

J

mattclary
02-23-2004, 12:57 PM
Originally posted by Johnny
F Prime? Sounds like either a good Scotch, or some 3D tool?

J

OK, man, you need to hang out in the community section more. ;)

http://www.worley.com

Axis3d
02-23-2004, 06:01 PM
When I build a character as a subdivision object, I'll add everything to the model, all the morfs, weight mapping, etc. Then I will make a lo-rez version of it so I can animate with a "lighter" model. I'll remove any parts of the objects that are high poly counts and unnecessary like clothing, horns, nails, anything I really don't need to animate.

When you model as a sub-division object (hitting the tab key in modeler), you have the unique ability in layout to "dial" in the amount of smoothness, or subdivision when you go to render. You also have the ability to use a low setting to view the object while you are working with it. This is what can dramatically speed up re-draws in layout. Open the Objects Property panel. Under the Geometry tab, Display SubPatch Level, setting this value to 0, 1, or 2 can help speed things up. The Render SubPatch Level is what actually gets rendered.

If you need to make changes to your model you may not need to make another standin object. It really depends on what changes you make. If you are changing the shirt that a character is wearing, your standin probably doesn't have a shirt on anyway, so you wouldn't have to make a new standin. If you are changing or adding weight maps or something like that, then you might make a new one.

When you animate in layout, you frequently want to have a clean scene with only the objects that you are animating in it. These would be the standin objects. When you are done, you can save the scene. Use Load from Scene to add these objects to another pre-made scene with all your final lighting, objects, etc. The animation you made will load in and now all you need to do is replace these standin objects with the real thing. In Layout, Items > Replace > Replace with Object File. Then pick your hi-rez object.