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mattclary
02-16-2004, 09:14 AM
This could be good. Maybe push Linux into mainstream then we can perhaps get LightWave for Linux. If we can't get LW for Linux, we may be able to get Notepad instead!


from arstechnica:

IBM to bring MS Office to... Linux?
Posted 02/15/2004 @ 9:48 AM, by Matt Woodward


It is strange, but true. IBM has plans to bring Microsoft Office to the Linux desktop. If such a feat ever happens, it will not be a native Linux application, but would run through emulation. Details are sparse right now, but current indicators are that this may possibly be done via work from Codeweavers, Wine, and efforts from IBM to utilize "code provided by Microsoft to make it happen." Linus Torvalds has hinted that 2004 may be the big year for Linux on the desktop. Is it possible that MS Office will be the "killer app" that puts Linux on the desktop map? Possibly. But it is more likely that the latest 2.6 kernel and the latest releases of Gnome and KDE have something to do with this as well. We should also be quick to point out there are already viable "office suites" for Linux such as StarOffice and OpenOffice, both of which have a good track record and high compatibility with MS Office documents. Despite all this, the notion of Microsoft Office running on the Linux desktop may be just the thing to get more businesses and end users to adopt it. Though one has to wonder, if Office is indeed ported, will Outlook make Linux vulnerable to all the viruses that persistently plague Windows?

jr_sunshine
02-16-2004, 09:31 AM
I bet you there are going to partner with MS to port the Office applications as .NET managed code applications.

This is good for all parties especially Microsoft. If MS delivers Office as a fully managed code application and the .NET framework is available on multiple platforms (check out the Mono project which is running on Linux and OS X) they can open new areas for revenue and deliver Office using a subscription over the net. From what I see, this is a brilliant move on MS's part. They make IBM and the Linux (prodounced MS haters) happy and at the same time make the porting requirements easier for the Mac.

Beamtracer
02-16-2004, 02:01 PM
Do people really need Microsoft Office? The application seems to grow bigger each year, just to be a RAM hog. How can a word processor keep growing to such an enormous size? It's just a word processor!

Star Office is an alternative that comes at a fraction of the price, and uses a fraction of the RAM.

Ideally, word processors should be written in the Java programming language, so that the one application can run on any computer platform.


Originally posted by mattclary
from arstechnica:

Though one has to wonder, if Office is indeed ported, will Outlook make Linux vulnerable to all the viruses that persistently plague Windows? Outlook Express should be officially renamed "Virus Express".

Sho
02-16-2004, 11:18 PM
Note that Microsoft has denied any knowledge of this - and without the source code, IBM can't port Office. This has been blown out of proportion, it probably only refers to IBM intending to run MS Office on Linux via Wine, an open implementation of the Win32 APIs for Linux. Wine also allows you to run LightWave on Linux reasonably well, although probably not legally as it seems to have problems with the dongle.

Edit:


Jonas Persson, Microsoft sales director for development tools, denies that Microsoft is collaborating with IBM about the Office suite.

According to him, there can be no porting of Office to Linux. More likely is that an emulation version is being developed.

"I am sure IBM is looking at different solutions. That's good, we encourage evaluations," said Persson.

Source: http://www.infoworld.com/article/04/02/13/HNlinuxoffice_1.html

TyVole
02-17-2004, 05:25 AM
Originally posted by Beamtracer
Do people really need Microsoft Office? The application seems to grow bigger each year, just to be a RAM hog. How can a word processor keep growing to such an enormous size? It's just a word processor!

Star Office is an alternative that comes at a fraction of the price, and uses a fraction of the RAM.

Ideally, word processors should be written in the Java programming language, so that the one application can run on any computer platform.

Outlook Express should be officially renamed "Virus Express".

The last time I used StarOffice, I felt it was certainly nice for the price ($0), but it really wasn't at the level of Microsoft. Also, many corporations choose Microsoft for the support.

A word processor written in Java would be incredibly slow.

mattclary
02-17-2004, 05:49 AM
Originally posted by Beamtracer
Do people really need Microsoft Office?

I work for a software company that writes a document management app. 99% of my dealings with our customers have involved their office apps, be it Corel or Microsoft and a small percentage use Lotus. "Compatibility" is not good enough in most cases. If you have years of documents created in Word, you REALLY need to stick with Word.

I could write a dissertation on how your choice of office apps will affect you, but suffice it to say that for huge corporations and the many law firms across the planet, switching their OS might be an option, but switching their word processor is not.

Lightwolf
02-17-2004, 06:25 AM
Just to add my two cents here...
I've been using Star Office since, erm, 5. something, and openOffice ever since. We're a small co, so switching wasn't really a problem. I can read all office documents (with minor flwas every now and then), and haven't had any problems with the stuff I sent out to customers so far.
I love the fact that it is more concise than ms office. It may not have the bells and whistles, but I prefer it as far as workflow is concerned (tables in a text document are a joy to use), and it doesn't have problems with huge, complex documents.

So, why a slow Java app?

As for the original topic: I guess IBM is trying to counter Suns initiative (desktop linux + StarOffice with support for 49(?) US$ per seat per year).

I think the only MS software I have in use is the OS :)

Cheers,
Mike