PDA

View Full Version : deleted cfg and guess what.....



vinito
02-11-2004, 06:01 PM
hI AGAIN

Well I went up to the labs deleted the cfg files, restarted the program.... and guess what!.....they started again in the old 5 and 6 layout.... It made me blow a fuse in my brain....grrrr.

I am now getting IT to reinstall LW on all the machines and save a copy of the cfg files.


Franz

:mad:

digimassa
02-12-2004, 03:13 AM
:cool: maybe your students placed a copy of the config.files somewhere on the computer and inserted the path to them into the desktop shortcut, so LW uses these configs.

mattclary
02-12-2004, 06:00 AM
Agreed. It's software, not magic.

Tom Wood
02-12-2004, 07:55 AM
Layout - Interface - Edit Menu Layout - Presets, click that to get a dropdown menu that has choices like default, 6.0 Style and 5.6 Style. Switch back and forth between 6.0 and default, and end on default, and it will reset the desktop back to 7.x

I have to do this everytime I dump the config files and then have to scan directories for plugins. Called tech support to learn this.

TW

Kurtis
02-12-2004, 08:39 AM
Digimassa has a point.

The shortcuts used to launch Layout and Modeler can be modified to point to other locations than the default for config files to be used when running them.

Here is a quick and easy thing you can do, to see if this is the case.

1) Go to the shortcut used to launch Modeler.
2) Right-click on the shortcut and go to Properties.
3) In the Target line, see if there is anything at the end of the path to the executable, especially extra code starting with -c.
4) If there is, delete anything after .exe to send LightWave to the default location, Documents and settings, to look for the config files.
5) Click on Apply and OK to apply the changes and close the Properties window.
6) Repeat these steps for the shortcut used to launch Layout.

It might turn out to have been a glitch in the end, but I've taught LightWave and HTML at the Community College level, both in semester-long and one-day classes, and I've learned to avoid underestimating a students ability to modify code, just because they don't know how to operate the program I'm teaching.