PDA

View Full Version : How important is school



Ziah
02-01-2004, 02:16 PM
how important is school in the 3d world. Can you survive in the 3d special fx world without it and just simply go and earn money being just a master of your craft??

If so why go to school
whut would be the advantages

Like some of the freelancers and guys to join in one this one i think itll help people like me and others to have a sense of direction

prospector
02-01-2004, 02:26 PM
That depends on the speed you are looking for.
Most of the guys teaching started when LW was in it's infancy and learned by trial and error.
There were no 'schools' then.
What you are paying for is the get to know the program without the trial and error period, and you don't get the learning curve of doing alone.

So if you need to learn FAST then a school is best.
If you have time then doing all the tuts that you can find will get you going rather good.

Also alot of them specialize in certain areas like texturing, building objects, animation. Tho they CAN do other things if needed.

Aegis
02-01-2004, 02:26 PM
Well, I'm self-taught but I've had the privilege of working in TV, film and video games in a number of studios which has taught me a lot over the years - I'd say the biggest benefit of schooling is learning from people who've worked in the industry - anyone can learn a 3D package but it's one thing knowing a piece of software and quite another being able to produce results to deadlines...

Ziah
02-01-2004, 02:35 PM
If so why go to school?
whut would be the advantages?

Why not use ur college time to study business or computers or another subject and come home and pour hours of passion into your 3d work allowing you to have a hand in both spectrums ..professions that is that you have a fall back on multiply planes that is all well sed and done if school is not that important but suupose it is im sure going to alot of these graphic specializing and art schools give you a head start maybe through internsh other things

Id like to hear from some of the freelancers who have not went to school and are masters of their craft guys like The ripper brilliant modeller and guys who wnet to shcool and reap the benefits from that side of the disscussion

I hope you guys reply to this and it not turn into any kind of flaming war. I think it can help yung'uns like me and others who have similar thoughts get that thrist of knowledge on the topic quenched giving us a sense of direction and elimanating some fear many may have

prospector
02-01-2004, 03:46 PM
If so why go to school?

We mentioned it..

I'd say the biggest benefit of schooling is learning from people who've worked in the industry (aegis)

What you are paying for is the get to know the program without the trial and error period, (me)
So if you need to learn FAST then a school is best. (me again)






Why not use ur college time to study business or computers or another subject and come home and pour hours of passion into your 3d work allowing you to have a hand in both spectrums ..

Mentioned too
If you have time then doing all the tuts that you can find will get you going rather good. (me again)

I am self taught from LW3, run my own buisness (with the Amiga toaster and now the VT2)
I didn't go to collage tho, just bought the toaster, looked at it for a couple of days (watched the 'FREEDOM' tape for a couple of more, just running and rerunning) then quit my job and devoted all my time to learn it, started my own video buisness after about 9 months.
Using video,and LW together.
Do I know every in and out of LW? NOPE
Do I NEED to know every in and out of LW? NOPE.

I doubt anyone knows every button and setting in LW.

So if you have time to learn while in collage, the do a tut daily untill you know the tut blindfolded, and do another, after collage you will know LW and whatever you learn in collage.

If you want to go directly into 3D then take a 3D school, so you can learn faster.

It depends what you want to do.

You CAN make it in the 3D world without schooling.
There are plenty of us out there.

SamuraiSlayer
02-01-2004, 05:48 PM
this is my personal opinion:

I don't think that what you'd learn about LW in college is what's important. What college teaches is structure, and the rest comes second. College isnt like grade school, because you don't pay for grade school. When you get into college you will be paying for it and will want to make it worth your money. It is definately possible to go without college with a 3D career, but think about it like this; if you are doing a tutorial on box-modeling a head, and its too hard, you give up and start on something else. In college, there may be a 2 or 3 week lesson on box-modeling, and so there you are sitting listening to the instructor, so you know you arent going to go do HyperVoxels because then what are you going to tell your instructor? "Well its too hard :(" So then he'll tell you "Here, let's do it step-by-step." Now are you going to say "No thats ok i quit"? NO, YOU ARENT! I'd say its all in the power of your will, and if you can discipline yourself to spend 8 hours on Friday night doing box-modeling tutorials, then dont go to college. If you don't have that discipline, then its back to the dorms.

:)

Tom Wood
02-01-2004, 09:15 PM
If you can really spend the time, then find a college program at a university that includes art, psychology, biology, architecture, physics, math, literature... all those great subjects, in a single degree program. I don't think they try that anymore, but with the right mixture of electives, you can get close. It's not about learning the mechanics, it's about learning why the mechanics work.

TW

guch30
02-03-2004, 09:44 AM
Colluj will teech yu how too spel.
:)

prospector
02-03-2004, 10:16 AM
Tom Woods..
Do we know that cutie well enough to be blowing kisses at each other???:D

JReble
02-03-2004, 10:42 AM
I vote for both at the same time. College will expose you to new ideas, people, and environments that you would likely never be aware of if you skip it. This has the effect of providing you with context as you move into the business world. I believe having some context is the most important trait anyone can have. You might not learn anything genuinely practical or relevant to the "real world" or the trade you're going into, but you do get to see how others approach these things. Knowing how others approach a problem, learning what doesn't interest you, or learning what not to do are just as important as anything a college can teach you intentionally. While in a professional educational institution, (if you are taking it at all seriously) you are also likely to develop relationships with people in similar fields, backgrounds, or with similar interests. These relationships can also be of great benefit.

If it is at all within your reach money-wise to go to a professional educational institution do it. Concern over time is not a valid excuse when you actually have the option. If you know what to be on the lookout for, the college years can be more productive career-wise than going it on your own. Just don't be of the illusion that it's all about the credits and classes. I've had plenty of assistants come and go that I genuinely believe came out of college dumber than when they entered, all they got to show for it is a piece of paper. How you spend your time there on other things is at least as important. Hell, business management or liberal arts are fine degrees to walk away with regardless of your chosen field, but it's all useless if you aren't making connections and observations related to your interest while you pursue the degree. Even if you don't ultimately get a degree, you'll be better off if your time there is spent well. You're gonna have to pay some dues early on, and there are a hell of a lot worse places to start paying them than in college, trust me.

There are lots of self educated basement dwellers out there that make money in CGI or related fields, but these guys tend to have few interpersonal skills and a pretty narrow view of the world by default. A decent college or professional school helps you to better teach yourself, but you're gonna ultimately be self education as well. You can go much further and enjoy your work more with the total package. Plus, you may benefit from gaining a little wisdom earlier than you would have normally. This helps you cope better with some of the schlubs you'll be faced with along the way. And that's a little pearl of wisdom from someone who's seen both sides of the fence and is quickly approaching middle age. Now go do the right thing unless you wanna wear your *** for a hat!

ted
02-03-2004, 11:47 AM
I never went to College, (just a 3 month trade school to get a First Class License which was needed for broadcast in 1976).
And so far I've been pretty successful in the business.

HOWEVER, I'm encouraging my kids to finish College and strongly recommend it to others.
I've had college graduates fail miserably and high school dropouts succeed here. But for most companies, a college degree is looked upon as a plus on applications.

Either way, you must excel at what you do to have long-term success. Grab all the experience you can and strive to be the best in your field.
This industry never stops changing, NEVER stop learning and you'll do fine I'm sure.