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Smcvicar
01-18-2004, 11:37 AM
I spent several hours yesterday trying to accomplish what should have been very simple.

I was trying to key a logo over video for a project. I used
Adobe Photoshop to create the logo (I know Aura is powerful but the learning curve is very steep and not very user friendly). I then saved that out as a transparent GIF and brought it into Aura. I tried to export that as a brush and then took it into TED.

But I couldn't get it to work...I tried to enable the overlay with no luck. I tried several formats...sometimes the logo would be way too big and also out of proportion.

Is there a necessary plug-in to use a Photoshop graphic? I eventually want to switch my paint program to AfterEffects.

Any advice is appreciated. I need to get this project done by the end of the week.

Scott
Lewisburg, PA

Ivan
01-18-2004, 11:57 AM
Save this file as a .PNG in photoshop, drop it on the timeline and turn on overlay.

The learning curve in Aura is much less than Photoshop or AfterEffects.

Ivan

Jim Capillo
01-18-2004, 12:09 PM
Resize your images in Photoshop to 720 X 486 if they are too big, if they are too small, make them the size you like with the positioner in TEdit. You can do that if they're too big, too.

I usually erase the parts of the logo I don't want before I export it to the VT.

To get a smooth eraser (no hard edges) in PS, go to |Image|mode|Indexed Color then convert the image to RGB Color after that. I haven't quite figured out why this works, but it does.

After cleanup, export to VT as a .png, drop it on the timeline, and enable overlay.

As I said before, resize as needed in positioner.

tmon
01-18-2004, 12:46 PM
(Ivan, I wish that Aura's learning curve was easier for me, but it's 2004, and I STILL can't figure out how to use Aura except for file conversion! Now that the RTV plugin for AE works, I'm not sure why/for what I would use Aura or Mirage, but one day maybe I'll figure it out. I use Photoshop for image prepping and After Effects for 90% plus compositing - keying and effects are vastly superior than what you can do in VT-Edit alone.)

Logo placement is our bread and butter.

Don't forget about the square vs. non-square pixel issue.

A thread from the old Newtek Forums:

************
(I can't remember where I got this tutorial from, but I've used this one with success in another NLE app. My apologies to the originator of these useful instructions.)

You cannot mix square and non-square pixel media in a single program. D1 video uses a rectangular-shaped pixel aspect ratio. Applications such as Photoshop generate square pixel images.

Therefore, the pixel aspect ratio interpretation for all 720x486 images has to be changed accordingly.

To create properly sized images prior to importing into TEd:

1. Launch Photoshop.
2. Set the image size to 720x540 (NTSC) or 768x576 (PAL).
3. Create the image.
4. Resize the image to 720x486 (NTSC) or 720x576 (PAL).

To resize a previously created image before importing:

1. Launch Photoshop.
2. Crop the image to 720x540 (NTSC) or 768x576 (PAL).
3. Resize the image to 720x486 (NTSC) or 720x576 (PAL).

For large numbers of images, you can record an action and just run that for all of the images you are prepping.

Resizing compensates for the difference between square and non-square pixels. When you crop and resize the image, it looks distorted in Photoshop, but when you bring it into the TEd timeline, the image stretches and is displayed properly.

*By Scott Bates (Sbates) (64.146.16.102) on Friday, October 18, 2002 - 09:06 pm:

For those who don't have Photoshop to do the batch scaling, go get IrfanView, a really nice freeware program available at www.irfanview.com.

*By takahito torimoto (Ttorimoto) (12.34.130.2) on Wednesday, October 23, 2002 - 02:44 pm:

i thought TEd did this stretching automatically?

*By Randy Luczak (Vip3drand) (68.6.74.23) on Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 11:02 am:

The automatic stretching in TED is the reason for you having to make sure that the images coming from photoshop are properly stretched or squished before bringing into TED.

*By David Titchenal (Titch) (207.104.56.180) on Thursday, October 24, 2002 - 12:18 pm:

Scott,

Your right. Irfanview rocks

Dave

bradl
01-18-2004, 04:55 PM
Scott,

Two additional points:

1. If you work in 720 X 486 in Photoshop and save as PNG, your graphics will drop on VTEdit properly sized and positioned and look very clean. You could work at a smaller or larger size, but for most stuff you shouldn't. At the current time VT 'automatically' sizes any still up or down to perfectly fit the screen, while maintaining aspect ration. To override this and bring your still back to the size you created it at, simply set Size (%) to 100 in the Control Tree.

2. Photoshop CS now has a Pixel aspect feature that lets you work and view in .9 (and others) pixel aspect. Very handy.

SBowie
01-19-2004, 06:03 AM
Originally posted by taiji
(Ivan, I wish that Aura's learning curve was easier for me, but it's 2004, and I STILL can't figure out how to use Aura except for file conversion! Just as an aside, I have to say (in a friendly, conversational way - truly!) that a) I agree that from version 2 on, Aura's learning curve was steeper than desirable, but b) I actually think the learning curve of Photoshop is much steeper.

The thing is, everybody already knows the basics in Photoshop, has a pretty good idea what it can do. People often come to Aura expecting Photoshop (and there are also those who are expecting AE!).

With respect to Mirage, while there are aspects of it that immediately make it much easier to dive into, and more flexible (esp. for video guys), I think there's still lots of room for improved user-friendliness -- but it's early days, and a lot of attention is going to these things. The thing that nudges me into commenting here is the notion that Photoshop is somehow user-friendly, or intuitive. I really can't agree with that at all. I don't think it's good in either category - it has just become 'familiar.'

Jim_C
01-19-2004, 10:14 AM
Originally posted by SBowie
The thing that nudges me into commenting here is the notion that Photoshop is somehow user-friendly, or intuitive. I really can't agree with that at all. I don't think it's good in either category - it has just become 'familiar.'


I would agree.
I am slowly teaching a friend of mine who has no graphic past at all Photoshop. With emphasis on slowly. He is very computer literate and catches on to most apps quickly, but PS is definetely not coming easy to him.
I believe starting from ground zero it would be just as easy(or hard) to teach him Mirage or Aura.
None of these programs are for the faint of heart and we should consider ourselves lucky if we get any of them.

Jim

Jim Capillo
01-19-2004, 10:32 AM
I agree with Steve and Jim. It took me about 6 months before I became what I call "competent" in PS. I don't consider myself that in either Aura or Mirage..... I don't use them on a daily basis because of the familiarality with PS. Usually I need to do things quickly and I don't have time to either look it up in the manual or post to the websites looking for a solution.

So I guess what we're all saying is that you dance with whatever ya brought to the ball ! :p

bradl
01-19-2004, 10:34 AM
Steve/Jim,

I think Photoshop and Mirage are awesome programs.

I have used Photoshop starting way back at version 3 or so. It has grown to become a first class tool for video production, despite it being design for many other things. It can do what you used to pay BIG bucks to companies like Quantel to do. Only thing lacking is animation support, although some plug-ins can output them. AE I guess is the next logical step up but I have never bought it as I felt I had things covered with DFX, Mirage/Aura and Lightwave. But one day I may try it.

I was using Aura quite a bit for a while and was 'getting' it. But frankly, since VT3 stepped it up, I don't find myself using it (Mirage) as much as I did. I do like the cool new things in Mirage though. There was a time where I tried for weeks to do things in Aura I would usually do in Photoshop, and frankly gave up. While it could do most things I needed, it was cumbersome and slow going. Most of that being me much more comfortable in PS.

For stills, CG, photgraphs, touch-up, scanning, etc. I head for PS, but for animations, effects, conversion, and compositiong VT can't handle, I head Mirage.

videoguy
01-19-2004, 10:53 AM
you guys should try digital fusion i aboslutely love it. its extremely powerfull the learning curve is about average and it intergrates with the vt3

Daren
01-19-2004, 03:47 PM
The one thing the Adobe products do have going in their favor is that the training DVD tutorials that are avalible are excellent.
The take you through EVERY FEATURE, and every aspect of the programs.

VS.

The training tapes that I have seen for Aura only cover some of the features and in no way attempt to turn over every rock and cover everything that the Aura can do.

Does DFX have any training DVDs or where can you go to be educated on DFX?

Thanks
Daren

Tom Wood
01-19-2004, 03:55 PM
I've never used PS and was struggling mightily with Aura (and LightWave and VT at the same time) when I decided to make my life even more miserable by adding Mirage. Steve will attest to my many 'don't get it' questions on various forums. But one morning the light just flipped on, it was weird. Learning these programs is like trying to channel the minds of the people that create them, you have to see the world from their POV. :D

Anyway, I found a production process that works, so I'm sticking to it! :p

TW

tmon
01-19-2004, 05:19 PM
when I decided to make my life even more miserable by adding Mirage.

LOL! Me too!

But, the light hasn't flipped on. I have to finish Steve's tutorials...

:p

SBowie
01-19-2004, 06:18 PM
Originally posted by videoguy
you guys should try digital fusion i aboslutely love it. its extremely powerfull the learning curve is about average and it intergrates with the vt3 I also love Fusion, don't get me wrong ...

It's a very different app, though, from Photoshop, which (in my view) is a great image processing app with some painting tools that I'm not really that crazy about or Mirage (great painting tools, some image processing.) Fusion is IP and compositing primarily... not paint.