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erikals
03-12-2019, 03:50 PM
Do you feel fooled by the illustrations? How, "rendering" has changed the architecture.

https://i.imgur.com/CRcsFgl.png

thought it was an interesting article...

...sorry, Norwegian reference here, but think it gives a clue
https://www.aftenposten.no/kultur/i/1k1RvJ/Foler-du-deg-lurt-av-illustrasjonene-Slik-har-rendering-endret-arkitekturen


https://ap.mnocdn.no/images/e1124d6e-1041-4c34-b904-f3d1f0baa0d8?fit=crop&q=80&w=580

is it "cool" to use "make-up" selling a product knowing in reality it will be nothing like the final product?

by the way, this is the new Munch Museum (unfortunately)

Sensei
03-12-2019, 04:33 PM
I don't agree with premise.. that's builders and engineers who could not, or didn't want to follow, original sketches and designs.. I bet architect would love to see his/her buildings looking like on the first picture..

On render building has metallic surface, metal which is not reactive with Oxygen from air.. on the real it looks like made of concrete..
(you know that the all now green Copper statues were not green when they were released, right?)

OTOH, such metallic, highly reflective surface, can create spots on the ground which will receive abnormal amount of energy from the Sun.. and melt things..
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2786723/London-skyscraper-Walkie-Talkie-melted-cars-reflecting-sunlight-fitted-shading.html


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vzs2IVoovQ

erikals
03-12-2019, 04:39 PM
I don't agree with premise.. that's builders and engineers who could not, or didn't want to follow, original sketches and designs.. I bet architect would love to see his/her buildings looking like on the first picture..
true, in this case it was a bit of both.
too often though i see Fantastic ArchViz renders that just doesn't flow anywhere near reality.

Sensei
03-12-2019, 04:48 PM
true, in this case it was a bit of both.
too often though i see Fantastic ArchViz renders that just doesn't flow anywhere near reality.

What 3D archviz artist are receiving, are basic sketches how building should looks like. He/she goes to location (or look them up in Google Maps etc.) and tries to put it in, in his/her vision of building "how I would like to make it"... engineers have different vision than archviz artist.. ;)
3D visualization has to sell "hole in the ground" (like we're calling buying not ready building here in Poland). Investors pay for thing which is not ready, or literally is just at ground level, looking just on 3D visualization of the thing..

erikals
03-12-2019, 05:06 PM
it's inevitable i guess...

what you bought vs what you got (https://www.google.com/search?q=what+you+bought+vs+what+you+got&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b-ab)

50one
03-13-2019, 12:36 AM
It's bot only archviz, almost all product design these days starts with the "feel" sketch, be it a car, watch, furniture, piece of garment in most cases the artistic visualisation goes all the way until the product get released.

To me, when it comes to archviz it should be legally forbidden as the visuals should be as close representibg reality as possible, so that other institutions could get the feel on how landscape is affected, solar absorption and reflection as mentioned above.

What's been posted here seems like an extreme case and I believe fokks responsible should be held accountable.

ccclarke
03-13-2019, 04:34 AM
I specialize in concept art. The engineers drive the design and I interpret their vision according to their specifications/blueprints to create renders as close to the finished product as possible. We include them in the proposal briefing package to the customer who in turn authorizes a prototype to ensure it meets the specifications/requirements. After testing, the decision is made as to whether or not to go into production.

In this case, design influences the art, and the art helps sell the concept. Photo-realistic renders are an ideal way of creating a virtual product without spending time/money machining and building anything.

We had a customer freak out during a design proposal, yelling and banging his fist on the table because he hadn't authorized us to build any hardware. (None of our hardware is inexpensive.) The program managers let him compose himself and calmly explained that none of the "photos" the design team were showing him were real. He thanked us for such a thorough briefing and we landed the contract. That led to a lot of laughs after the meeting.

sadkkf
03-13-2019, 01:37 PM
This reminds me of the first Android phone. Designers wanted to compete with the iphone, but the prototype was nothing like the concept. The marketing team spun it as "this ain't no iphone" and saved their collective butts, in a way.