PDA

View Full Version : Question)Making a pixel-art-style animation



kei_ch
04-24-2018, 10:13 PM
Inspired by "Hyper Light Drifter", I am currently interested in making a pixel-art-style animation using 3DCG.
I have both LW11.6 and LW2018.

What I've tried is below:
-using Cel shader to flat shaded images
-render images at very low resolution such as 100x100pixels (anti-aliasing is turned off)
-then save the images using "rescale" function

these are all done in LW.
one major problem is that rescaled images get anti-ailiasing like effect. I don't want this...

any solution for this?
maybe After Effects is my good weapon but I don't want to use any other software...

Saving VPR preview looks like a good aproach, but I don't know how to rescale preview...

Any ideas or suggestions would be welcome.
Thank you.

ernpchan
04-24-2018, 10:23 PM
"-then save the images using "rescale" function"
Is this a step in LightWave or a different program?

hypersuperduper
04-25-2018, 12:50 AM
If you want to do everything in lightwave It may be worth trying an actual grid of polygons in front of the camera, and casting a ray from the camera through each polygon to pick up the color of objects in the scene behind. The advantage of this approach is that you would be able to see the pixilated result directly in vpr, and you could easily scale the grid as needed toget just the right amount of pixelization. The disadvantage is that I don’t think it would pickup any atmospheric effects.

After Effects seems more like the right tool for this though. Just use the mosaic effect and call it a day. Alternatively if you don’t have after effects it would be pretty easy to use the free ImageMagick command line image editor to batch convert your output images.

kei_ch
04-25-2018, 01:56 AM
"-then save the images using "rescale" function"
Is this a step in LightWave or a different program?

It's in LightWave.
When I save rendered image as RGB, I get several options from drop down menu in render view.
"Rescale and save" is one of them that I found there.

kei_ch
04-25-2018, 02:09 AM
If you want to do everything in lightwave It may be worth trying an actual grid of polygons in front of the camera, and casting a ray from the camera through each polygon to pick up the color of objects in the scene behind. The advantage of this approach is that you would be able to see the pixilated result directly in vpr, and you could easily scale the grid as needed toget just the right amount of pixelization. The disadvantage is that I don’t think it would pickup any atmospheric effects.

After Effects seems more like the right tool for this though. Just use the mosaic effect and call it a day. Alternatively if you don’t have after effects it would be pretty easy to use the free ImageMagick command line image editor to batch convert your output images.

thanks for the tip.
It sounds a little bit tricky but is very interenting.
However, I don't need grid line...
I only need outline to be pixelized.
Fortunately, I have After Effects and maybe better to take a look at After Effect tutorials...
anyway, thank you for the advice.

souzou
04-25-2018, 02:48 AM
There's a great plugin for After Effects called RetroDither that may be useful:
https://aescripts.com/retrodither/

Ztreem
04-25-2018, 02:57 AM
You can also use the preview scale level for previews and make preview with vpr to get a pixelated image.
141413

ernpchan
04-25-2018, 08:54 AM
In Photoshop if you scale up an image with the option of "nearest neighbor" the image won't get blurry and lose the original hard pixel look.

MonroePoteet
04-25-2018, 12:24 PM
You might also disable anti-aliasing and see if the old-school "jaggies" are close to the look you want. In the Camera Properties panel, take the Maximum Samples down to 1.0, turn off Adaptive Sampling and make the Filter Size 0.

mTp

hypersuperduper
04-25-2018, 05:44 PM
I got a little curious how well the raytrace solution i mentioned would actually work and experimented a bit. It works quite well! Far better than I thought actually.
It might not be what you are looking for, but it may provide some advantages over the various postprocessing solutions suggested in that you can see and adjust the pixelization as you work. You can rotate and transform the pixels however you see fit. you could even do this with different shaped pixels they could be hexagonal or completely irregular if you wanted.

I figured I might share my test scene.

141417
141418

kei_ch
04-25-2018, 07:41 PM
>souzou

There's a great plugin for After Effects called RetroDither that may be useful:
https://aescripts.com/retrodither/
Thanks! It seems to be the best tool when making 16bit game look animation.
Although I don't want spend money as possible as I can, it's still interesting.


>Ztreem


You can also use the preview scale level for previews and make preview with vpr to get a pixelated image.
Attachment 141413
Thanks! This is very straightforward but might bring me the result that I want.
I'll try it later :)


>ernpchan


In Photoshop if you scale up an image with the option of "nearest neighbor" the image won't get blurry and lose the original hard pixel look.
Thank you! On the internet, I can see scaled images with nearest neighbor and they look pretty cool. Very clean edges with no blurry.
If I make a still image, I have to consider this option at first.


>MonroePoteet


You might also disable anti-aliasing and see if the old-school "jaggies" are close to the look you want. In the Camera Properties panel, take the Maximum Samples down to 1.0, turn off Adaptive Sampling and make the Filter Size 0.
Yes! This is what I tried. Thanks for reply anyway ;)


>hypersuperduper


I got a little curious how well the raytrace solution i mentioned would actually work and experimented a bit. It works quite well! Far better than I thought actually.
It might not be what you are looking for, but it may provide some advantages over the various postprocessing solutions suggested in that you can see and adjust the pixelization as you work. You can rotate and transform the pixels however you see fit. you could even do this with different shaped pixels they could be hexagonal or completely irregular if you wanted.

I figured I might share my test scene.
Thank you! I'm very surprised as well because , just as you said, the image you showed is super.
Besides, as you said already, this is NOT postprocessing and it's a huge advantage.
Being able to adjust how the pixelate effect works is exactly what I want to do.
Also, thank you for sharing test scene.
I definitely check it out ;)



Thank you guys for showing me various options!!!

MonroePoteet
04-25-2018, 08:46 PM
I got a little curious how well the raytrace solution i mentioned would actually work and experimented a bit. It works quite well! Far better than I thought actually.
It might not be what you are looking for, but it may provide some advantages over the various postprocessing solutions suggested in that you can see and adjust the pixelization as you work. You can rotate and transform the pixels however you see fit. you could even do this with different shaped pixels they could be hexagonal or completely irregular if you wanted.

I figured I might share my test scene.

141417
141418

Brilliant approach, and works great! Thanks for sharing!

mTP

shrox
04-25-2018, 08:51 PM
I got a little curious how well the raytrace solution i mentioned would actually work and experimented a bit. It works quite well! Far better than I thought actually.
It might not be what you are looking for, but it may provide some advantages over the various postprocessing solutions suggested in that you can see and adjust the pixelization as you work. You can rotate and transform the pixels however you see fit. you could even do this with different shaped pixels they could be hexagonal or completely irregular if you wanted.

I figured I might share my test scene.

141417
141418

Sweet!