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jperk
07-18-2017, 09:47 PM
I have my resume up to date, but it looks bland. Nothing fancy just something I whipped up in Google Docs. Do any 3d artists here have any pointers or examples they can share? That would be really helpful. I am currently getting my website together, which will include my resume as a PDF.

ernpchan
07-18-2017, 09:51 PM
Is it bland because of lack of content or because of boring formatting?

TreyX
07-18-2017, 10:50 PM
do a web search for resume writing and how to sell your skills. there are many resources online that can provide tips and valuable information. :deal: seems to me that your institution where you have been going to school should have resources as well...

50one
07-18-2017, 11:52 PM
If the cake is good it doesn't matter if it's wrapped with golden cellophane or newspaper;) don't take it wrong way but to the employer it's your folio and reel that should matter, resume and CV should be just a clear outlines of your skill/career/achievements.

prometheus
07-19-2017, 02:29 AM
You could also use premade art sites to "further" promote your stuff, like Steve.Burg...
https://www.artstation.com/artist/steveburg

Formerly known to have used lightwave..and may still do, and his been doing a lot of concept art for prometheus (not me) and for the latest covenant..and much much more.
Such sites where many artist lives may help connect to others in a network and make fuzz, but at the same time, to do that you need to have reached quite a high level to be comparable and be noticeable amongst all others very skilled artists.

raymondtrace
07-19-2017, 07:15 AM
A resume should look like text. Don't trouble the HR department by trying to visually design it as what you might perceive as a work of art. HR is only interested in text.

Keep in mind that making a resume is a very small part self marketing. Get yourself on professional networking sites: LinkedIn, IMDb, etc. When an employer seeks talent, they are not simply googling for anybody's web site and then digging in to retrieve a resume.

If you're posting a resume on your own web site, post as a regular HTML page. You can offer the option of PDF or DOCX but your resume will be found more easily if it is a regular web page, structured properly with headers (H1, H2...).

sadkkf
07-19-2017, 07:37 AM
A resume should look like text. Don't trouble the HR department by trying to visually design it as what you might perceive as a work of art. HR is only interested in text.

Keep in mind that making a resume is a very small part self marketing. Get yourself on professional networking sites: LinkedIn, IMDb, etc. When an employer seeks talent, they are not simply googling for anybody's web site and then digging in to retrieve a resume.

If you're posting a resume on your own web site, post as a regular HTML page. You can offer the option of PDF or DOCX but your resume will be found more easily if it is a regular web page, structured properly with headers (H1, H2...).

Totally agree.

Keep it simple and very readable. Most HR departments now want electronic copies so they can search for keywords based on the on position description. Too many graphics or formatting nonsense will make it difficult.

jperk
07-19-2017, 08:20 AM
Thanks for the comments.

Also, I don't think I mentioned that I'm talking more about resume layout, not really the text content. I'm talking more visual aesthetics. Like is it okay to use some graphics or minimal artwork on a resume PDF? Right now it's just a text document.

*EDIT

Okay sadkkf, just read your comment after I posted this. So keep resume text based only? No fluff? Not even minimal?

prometheus
07-19-2017, 08:26 AM
Thanks for the comments.

Also, I don't think I mentioned that I'm talking more about resume layout, not really the text content. I'm talking more visual aesthetics. Like is it okay to use some graphics or minimal artwork on a resume PDF? Right now it's just a text document.

*EDIT

Okay sadkkf, just read your comment after I posted this. So keep resume text based only? No fluff? Not even minimal?

I would believe itīs ok to us graphics and artwork in a resume pdf, if your an designer or digital artist, that needs to show there as well to stand out...not just a text document, if you apply for a workshop,or some normal office, then that may be enough, in my opinion and by given advice ..you should use graphics, but make it neat and slick..thatīs the trick, and not overdo it, same with web design I would say.

Oh..Just noticed that sadfkk and raymond trace advices text, I would disagree...but it depends on, if you can not deliver a slick design and make a clutter of it just to make an impression, then you may be better of with text, but if your resume shows up with many others and they are doing it slick, with similar skills and experience, which do you think will stand out? if you can design your resume good enought without overdoing it, it tells something about your capabilities to do that, imagine you would point them to a resume with just text on the web?

So one final advice considering what the others just recently said, keep it minimum, but do not try and follow the popular clean microsoft outlook mail design, which is basicly just text without any form or field to separate anything, itīs just a mess in my opinion.

Take a look at some of the Lightwave magazines on lightwave3d.com, but not necessarely adapting everything or not even most things, nothing can be more dull and speak of you as such person if you go with only text in my opinion.
Heck..maybe even think of a logo for yourself:)

50one
07-19-2017, 09:23 AM
One last thing to mention is that Nazis..I mean HR depts will copy/paste content anyway - so don;t bother with fancy PDFs or any other layouts, they'll ask you for "normal" Word doc.
This happened to me many times during past 10 yrs...

raymondtrace
07-19-2017, 10:13 AM
Some good reading...

https://www.monster.com/career-advice/article/resume-tips-creative-professionals
https://creativemarket.com/blog/resume-tips-for-designers
https://business.tutsplus.com/articles/9-creative-resume-design-tips-with-template-examples--cms-25478
https://www.reddit.com/r/graphic_design/comments/4xdm5x/what_a_resume_is_really_supposed_to_look_like/
http://www.mcwade.com/DesignTalk/2011/09/should-i-design-my-resume-2/
https://www.quora.com/Should-a-graphic-designer-have-a-normal-looking-resume-or-should-it-be-designed

Surrealist.
07-19-2017, 11:06 AM
What I did was search for some samples and picked a format that I liked. Then simply copied that. I used something with simple clean graphics that separated sections.

A resume can also be a way to introduce yourself in the beginning with a summary of your experience, interests and career goals. Not wordy. To the point.

As mentioned, search for examples.

prometheus
07-19-2017, 12:51 PM
What I did was search for some samples and picked a format that I liked. Then simply copied that. I used something with simple clean graphics that separated sections.

A resume can also be a way to introduce yourself in the beginning with a summary of your experience, interests and career goals. Not wordy. To the point.

As mentioned, search for examples.

Quite clean..., guess there is a couple of approaches, just text..boring spalted, or text with some careful works, or some graphics as shown in the example, clean but may be lacking personality, or do one that shows of your style, or one that shows off your personality.

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/39/e7/2d/39e72d205f3a83eb40120e2a9635671d--graphic-designer-resume-resume-design.jpg

jperk
07-19-2017, 02:55 PM
^
I don't see the point of including hobbies. It doesn't look very professional.

And raymondtrace, I don't get the point of adding a rating/ star level of expertise. How are individuals getting these numbers? How would the employer know what 4 stars/ circles means for Photoshop? It seems unrealistic and pointless to add this. It seems like too much fluff.

Is this what people are doing these days for resumes? It seems over designed for a resume to be honest. I was thinking something very minimal. Not "hobbies" or "rating systems and graphs" which make the resume look like a myspace page.

calilifestyle
07-19-2017, 03:10 PM
^
I don't see the point of including hobbies. It doesn't look very professional.

And raymondtrace, how I don't get the point of adding a rating/ star system of level of expertise. How are individuals getting these numbers? How would the employer know what 4 stars/ circles means for Photoshop? It seems unrealistic and pointless to add this. It seems like too much fluff.

Is this what people are doing these days for resumes? It seems over designed for a resume to be honest. I was thinking something very minimal. Not "hobbies" or "rating systems and graphs" which make the resume look like a myspace page.

I felt the same way. But it gave the interviewer a few subjects to relate with me and items to talk about. Also depending on the hobby it helped few people i worked with to get hired. At lest that what they told me

jperk
07-19-2017, 03:26 PM
I dunno it just looks tacky and stupid to me.

Surrealist.
07-20-2017, 12:15 AM
You have to understand that while some HR people might be rather blunt and to the point and business like, that getting a job is still selling you has a human being. You will have to interact with people on a daily basis who will want to get to know you as a person. What individual characteristics about you - aside from the training and work experience - that set you apart from others or might qualify you on a personal level for the job.

There is no absolute cookie cutter way to do anything. And it is one of those things where you have to be careful what you wish for. You want to work for uncaring, stiff people who only hire people based strictly on cold resumes and then find yourself in an office full of jerks?

The best practice is always let your personality come through in some way. It does not have to be unprofessional. You don't need a rating system. I agree with that. You don't need to list your favorite food or that you like long walks along the beach...lol

But remember it is Human Resources. Even if most of them have forgotten that.

The people who will be managing you certainly have that very front and center. They want to work with people who not only have the skills, confidence and reliability to do the job, they want someone who also has some kind of aptitude to the subject matter.

So your interests, applicable hobbies, things that help fill your background in such a way as people have a sense of who you are. And how well you will fit into the position as a person.

You will find you sell yourself on a job by job basis. And even things you don't put in your resume, might be the thing that gets you the job. ;)

prometheus
07-20-2017, 02:10 AM
I agree with surrealist,though what hobbies you have...should not be too much, and it needs to be focused, preferably if it is somehow related to graphics for instance, like you are art interested, or scifi interested etc, go fishing..well, maybe not something you would put up there, especially not if you need to keep it short..which you may want to, but it doesnīt exclude the possibility of a certain employee actually are having fishing tours as an activity for their employees, probably a long shot but things like that can matter, then again things like that may show up in a second round if you are interviewed and not in the first round where they may have to skim through many applied positions and letters, so keep it short and focus those hobbies to have some relevance to what that company may be doing..itīs my tip, but I wouldnīt just skip hobbies or interest .
If your hobby is related to the work position and something they may do, you need to sell that in as you as a person having a genuine interest in these fields, which the employee may find of interest to take advantage of...and to fit in.

ernpchan
07-20-2017, 06:50 AM
I've seen more and more resumes that list software with a rating system. I find it helpful because it shows self awareness on the applicant's part and helps us evaluate if someone is a good fit. Just listing off a bunch of software either means you're the rare super applicant or you're full of it. It's too hard to master all the programs out there unless you've had years and years of experience which not all applicants have.

Listing hobbies and interests is fine. Just make sure they're really interesting and unique to you. Don't put movies and reading. Everyone likes that. You might as well list breathing at that point. But if it's a specific genre or actor, then that's at least more specific and interesting. Information like that helps move the interview into getting to know you as a person. While your technical and artistic skillset is what is most important, your personality and ability to function within a group and professional environment will be evaluated too.

raymondtrace
07-20-2017, 06:58 AM
... It seems unrealistic and pointless to add this. It seems like too much fluff....

You are correct. There are some good comments to that effect at the bottom of one of the pages that illustrate infographic resumes. The links I posted were not to show one way or the other...but to illustrate the debate and considerations of an artist resume. I don't agree with all the points presented in the links I offered.

There is certainly merit in briefly mentioning hobbies to convey what type of person you are. For example, if applying for this design position, you might want to mention your love of daily Bible study. https://answersingenesis.org/about/job/?gnk=job&gni=8a7880665c23eaee015c3aac85ad3a52

raymondtrace
07-20-2017, 07:17 AM
I've seen more and more resumes that list software with a rating system. I find it helpful because it shows self awareness on the applicant's part and helps us evaluate if someone is a good fit. Just listing off a bunch of software either means you're the rare super applicant or you're full of it.

There is no meaningful way to rate with an infographic. The job seeker can still be full of it by presenting bogus ratings.

It is preferable to list certifications if you really want to show software or system expertise. Employers that depend on software proficiency will more likely offer a test during the interview process, especially for recent graduates. The employer can also recognize software experience from your employment history.

The main point of listing software is simply to hit keywords for candidate searches. One can more effectively demonstrate their software skill by showing work in progress in their portfolio. For 2D, you could show the stages of photo elements as they are composited. For 3D, you can show everything in a finished project (sketch, model, texture, lighting, render).

50one
07-20-2017, 09:23 AM
I think graphs, even cliparts are excellent idea and will make any recruiter hire you instantly. I would do for sure.
Be a rebel.

prometheus
07-20-2017, 10:23 AM
There is no meaningful way to rate with an infographic. The job seeker can still be full of it by presenting bogus ratings.

It is preferable to list certifications if you really want to show software or system expertise. Employers that depend on software proficiency will more likely offer a test during the interview process, especially for recent graduates. The employer can also recognize software experience from your employment history.

The main point of listing software is simply to hit keywords for candidate searches. One can more effectively demonstrate their software skill by showing work in progress in their portfolio. For 2D, you could show the stages of photo elements as they are composited. For 3D, you can show everything in a finished project (sketch, model, texture, lighting, render).

I sort of agree with the rating, sort of, with the exception of simply putting up three levels, not a score from 1-100% or 5star rating, but you can say you either are a noob, ..almost suck at what you do in that area ..(ow) or you are pretty good, (medium) or you are very good (expert) if not the question must be asked sometime, and some form of initial rating of your skills may be proactive.

kyuzo
07-21-2017, 05:43 AM
When I were a lad...
back in school my foundation graphics education was called 'graphical communication'. I've tried to never lose sight of the key principle that you need to know who your audience is, and get the information across cleanly and concisely. Slick design etc is all well and good, but the key information should be obvious for the reader/viewer at a glance.

Greenlaw
07-22-2017, 07:12 PM
Some might think my resume is a bit of 'overkill' but, in a crowded field, I feel it's important to make an impression and stand apart. Here's what my 2014 resume looked like (personal info redacted for privacy):

137456

Previously, I would mail out or drop off personalized hard copies bound in a clear report cover, which was inexpensive and made for a very nice presentation. I also kept a non-personalized PDF version on-line that could be downloaded upon request. The PDF version was also easier to sent via email when requested.

Some experts will say you shouldn't illustrate the resume, but I think that's nonsense when you're looking to get a job in a visual medum like design or animation. Well, it's worked for me anyway. I've been sending out illustrated resumes for as long as I've been working.

As for a text-only resume, yes, by all means have one prepared to send. Indeed, some studios may ask for a text-only version eventually. The way I see it, the pretty one is mostly to get their attention, and some studios will even file the illlustrated PDF copy without asking for a text-only version.

Finally, while the resume is certainly a necessary representation of who you are, when applying for VFX and animation jobs, it's really all about the demo reel. Make sure you have one and post it on Vimeo or YouTube. In my opinion, Vimeo gives the appearance of being more serious and professional. Oh, and don't bother with DVDs. Way back in 2013, I was still sending a DVD reel with a lot of fun 'extras', but I don't think anybody wants to bother with DVDs anymore. It's way more convenient for everybody if you have a link to a streaming version.

TreyX
07-22-2017, 10:22 PM
You have to understand that while some HR people might be rather blunt and to the point and business like, that getting a job is still selling you has a human being. You will have to interact with people on a daily basis who will want to get to know you as a person. What individual characteristics about you - aside from the training and work experience - that set you apart from others or might qualify you on a personal level for the job.

There is no absolute cookie cutter way to do anything. And it is one of those things where you have to be careful what you wish for. You want to work for uncaring, stiff people who only hire people based strictly on cold resumes and then find yourself in an office full of jerks?

The best practice is always let your personality come through in some way. It does not have to be unprofessional. You don't need a rating system. I agree with that. You don't need to list your favorite food or that you like long walks along the beach...lol

But remember it is Human Resources. Even if most of them have forgotten that.

The people who will be managing you certainly have that very front and center. They want to work with people who not only have the skills, confidence and reliability to do the job, they want someone who also has some kind of aptitude to the subject matter.

So your interests, applicable hobbies, things that help fill your background in such a way as people have a sense of who you are. And how well you will fit into the position as a person.

You will find you sell yourself on a job by job basis. And even things you don't put in your resume, might be the thing that gets you the job. ;)

very true, surrealist. also they are looking for people who work well with people, and will be a good fit for the team. hobbies and extracurricular activities/groups/affiliations speak a lot as to whether the applicant is outgoing or an introvert. someone whose hobbies are all isolationist in nature would most likely be passed up in favor of someone who enjoys interacting with others, and whose non-work interests reflect that (i.e., hobbies like playing video games vs. going rock climbing with friends...one is introverted and alone, the other shows an interest in teamwork, problem solving and learning physical skills). i would sincerely recommend that this thread starter not only focus on writing a good resume, but also take interviewing skills training (there are lots of videos on this subject on YouTube). you can have all the skills in the world, but if you don't come off right in the interview, you're not getting the job (you've got 60 seconds to make a good impression; if you fail in that first minute in the interview, you probably will not hear from them again). interviewing is a test, and seasoned hr professionals know exactly how to read people. companies invest heavily in a new employee, and no one wants someone who's going to be a bad fit for the team. this thread starter does not have extensive experience, so he's already at a disadvantage. the trick is to turn a disadvantage into an advantage, and that's going to be falling heavily into the person category, willingness to learn and grow, and whether the firm wants to invest in helping him make a career. they also want someone who will stay around for a while and grow with the business!

MichaelT
07-23-2017, 12:38 AM
Try to be original. As soon as anyone follows templates, they'll look ok, but it also means mainstream. You want to pop out & be remembered after all. I think the resume @GreenLaw posted is an example of that.. it pops, and will be remembered. That or use agents.

Surrealist.
07-23-2017, 01:35 AM
Or learn how to dance. That works wonders in the interview process. Especially if you can do high kicks. Back flips are a plus.

Zerowaitstate
07-23-2017, 02:21 AM
I dunno it just looks tacky and stupid to me.

I recently made a bunch of applications to a university i have been doing support work over the last few years, all of them failed as i was using an old way of laying out my resume .

I was surprised as snr people with in the IT department said i would be a shoe in.

i was surprised i didn't even make the short list.

luckily i was able to tap into a half day "how to get that job" workshop.

Through the course of the workshop one of the questions asked was how long do you think HR spends looking at a resume when doing a 1st sweep of applicants, i thought 2-3 mins per application would be a reasonable guess..... The answer and apparently industry standard is 6 freaking seconds !!!!

The front page needs to have who you are how to get hold of you and your experience / qualifications or your sunk

After attending the short work shop i have make another application and have been short listed.

Surrealist.
07-23-2017, 02:32 AM
Yeah, I think that is true. You should be able to summarize things very quickly at the top. But still, it really depends on the company and situation. It is not standard across the boards. At all. And from industry to industry it is going to vary quite a bit. Also if you are going for contract or freelance work as opposed to a salary position. The academic field is probably another nut to crack. Just from my brief experience with it.

Chernoby
07-23-2017, 10:12 AM
Yeah, I think that is true. You should be able to summarize things very quickly at the top. But still, it really depends on the company and situation. It is not standard across the boards. At all. And from industry to industry it is going to vary quite a bit. Also if you are going for contract or freelance work as opposed to a salary position. The academic field is probably another nut to crack. Just from my brief experience with it.

I agree with Surrealist. I would add that 99% of the time a fancy resume (by fancy I mean any kind of graphical element) works against you. Same with portfolio design... it should also just showcase the work. It is good to keep your cover letter, resume, and portfolio consistent looking. Same general font, layout, and style.

Contract and freelance work for local to regional gigs might be one place where a fancy resume works for you. Then you might be dealing an advertising agency or production company without an HR dept and the extra dazzle might work. Otherwise I'd say avoid it completely.

The thing that is way more important than resume design is content design, not just having one resume but several depending on what you are going for: one for a level designer, one for texture artist, one for animator, etc. Small things like rearranging skills to show buzzwords of the job ad up front are way more important than design. If it is an academic position then switch from resume to CV format.

Always include a cover letter even if they don't ask for one is important. Again, hit all the requirements of the job ad, how you fit exactly as the ad suggests. Spell everything out for them.

The 6 seconds HR spends looking at a resume is glancing the documents looking for those buzzwords. The second tier examination begins with also looking for the buzzwords. Of course the portfolio needs to be strong too, but mirroring the job ads wording is a great way to show them you fit their needs.

OlaHaldor
07-24-2017, 06:29 AM
I've seen those graphs and "skill level" bars, and I've never really understood why.
It doesn't tell me WHAT they know about the software. Thus I've never used any of that fancy stuff. I've just listed the software I use and that's it. I also think it comes down to what position you're applying for.
If you're applying for modeling, there's likely no questions like "can you blow up a car with soft and hard body dynamics?", right?

I have what I guess is a plain resume (with links to artstation), it got me my job, and I was told later by my supervisor that interviews are more about the person, not necessarily the skils.
She literally said "we want to have a sit down and talk a little bit about skills, expectations about the position, and see if we would enjoy your company during lunch breaks".

Lunch breaks are important. You get to know the people you work with, connect, interact, discuss and be part of the gang.

gar26lw
07-24-2017, 07:18 AM
Heres the resume:

Check my portfolio, You Can reach me on..:)