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View Full Version : Unreal is pulling ahead again



MichaelT
05-06-2017, 02:28 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWzPP5FAYAg&ab_channel=UnrealEngine

They're moving real quick over there.

prometheus
05-07-2017, 06:36 AM
cool stuff, nice realtime volumetrics and fluids, I suppose it is aimed for game engines, not for higher quality realistic renders though?
the initial setup they showcased for materials etc looked like a mess and not very UI inituive friendly, though later when the got to vr sculpting of volumetrics it all looked way better.
Thanks for sharing the heads up on new tech.

ianr
05-07-2017, 07:37 AM
There's an Incredible Info reveal In Cinefex no 151 ,

that I.L.M. have used an heavily rewritten version

as a Real Time Renderer in Cine Rez like a turbo charged

Redshift in the making of Rogue One. It spells a Game changer.

prometheus
05-07-2017, 07:59 AM
There's an Incredible Info reveal In Cinefex no 151 ,

that I.L.M. have used an heavily rewritten version

as a Real Time Renderer in Cine Rez like a turbo charged

Redshift in the making of Rogue One. It spells a Game changer.

Without knowing exactly how well the new lightwave volumetrics would render and how fast in performance with full attributes etc, but somehow I get the sense that not even that is something that may be able to compete with
newer real time Game engine developed volumetrics, and especially if that is adapted by large studios that may rewrite their own proprietary software based on such technologygy...there are of course differences and itīs to early to say...itīs just a feeling I have.

prometheus
05-07-2017, 08:15 AM
crossposting...(also in the thread of new lightwave volumetrics PBR)
some 2016 cloud and scattering physicly based rendering theories and practices, maybe some of it is worked on for the new volumetrics here, maybe not..and in such case may be of interest for future development perhaps...
Check 1:18:43...
Frostbite engine with physical based skies and volumetrics for rendering at 60fps.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zs0oYjwjNEo

Asticles
05-07-2017, 10:44 AM
Well, maybe small studios would prefer LW. Of course, LW coders should do what they're doing, improve the software. Throwing the towel when a new technology arises seems a bit drastic.

prometheus
05-07-2017, 11:07 AM
Well, maybe small studios would prefer LW. Of course, LW coders should do what they're doing, improve the software. Throwing the towel when a new technology arises seems a bit drastic.

I still live with oil lamps,no electricity here :)

Asticles
05-07-2017, 11:28 AM
I would do the opposite. Release an unreal realtime render to be integrated inside the major 3d apps.
And maybe not free.

gamedesign1
05-07-2017, 12:05 PM
I would do the opposite. Release an unreal realtime render to be integrated inside the major 3d apps.
And maybe not free.
+1 totally agree. I mentioned this a while back but not a lot of people agreed it would be that useful or worth the programmers integrating it.

VonBon
05-07-2017, 12:40 PM
Take a look at this.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r40PJ6r_P4c

Asticles
05-07-2017, 02:19 PM
I did one archviz project some time ago and we (at work) got very satisfied with the results, but GI was unsuable. It used a lot of time to calculate it, even with low settings. The problem was every wall, floor and ceiling had wood planks. I think Unreal is GREAT, but it needs some preparation (lowpoly meshes) and a deep knowing of the tricks of the engine.

Rendering with a 3d package is much more inmediate, also for changes. And of course, you can throw high poly meshes and textures to it without any problem.

There are a lot of archviz videos with unreal, but I don't think they would be done in the same time with 3dmax and vray, for example.

Always talking about stills. of course.

MichaelT
05-07-2017, 02:29 PM
Yeah, swarm isn't the quickest, but it is worth the effort in the end. Many companies are using it for a wild range of cases outside games these days.
When if comes to ILM, they used a heavily modified version of UE4. There is a video here:

https://www.polygon.com/2017/3/1/14777806/gdc-epic-rogue-one-star-wars-k2so

ianr
06-15-2017, 06:10 AM
Yeah, swarm isn't the quickest, but it is worth the effort in the end. Many companies are using it for a wild range of cases outside games these days.
When if comes to ILM, they used a heavily modified version of UE4. There is a video here:

https://www.polygon.com/2017/3/1/14777806/gdc-epic-rogue-one-star-wars-k2so

Thank you for another piece of ILM info. M-T

we wouldn't have LW lens flares if mr. Knoll hadn't coded them.

everything trickles down, sooner or later!

BUT , BUT,
it's the UnReal Sequencer thats blowin' my skirts up ATM

it's very creative in a Hyper edit sense,just what we need!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_wKOTmcHI84 Runtime to 12.30 mins approx

Danner
06-15-2017, 06:56 AM
I have been using Unreal with Lightwave for 3 solid weeks now. The engine is solely focused on nice looking visuals. In contrast with Unity which is geared more towards ease of use. Some things in Unreal are just incredibly good and easy, other things are disorganized, confusing and frustratingly non intuitive. The node editor has some amazing little workflow details, and other annoying traits.

It took me about about a week (with no prior knowledge of Unreal but with lots of Unity experience) to convert a lightwave scene and make it look nearly as good and export an avi. (and an .exe just for fun) To some of the guys here the Unreal version looked better, and in some ways, it is better. You have real-time control of bloom, color correction, exposure, motion blur, etc so it's easy to make it look good quickly.

But it's not all good in Unreal land, it lacks the perfection in the reflections that you can get with ray tracing and other fine details like finer control of shadows and things like that. (I spent way to much time tweaking how some lights render the shadow of transparent objects with a mask solid, but the light type that renders the mask is unreliable and doesn't see other transparent objects, and trying to eliminate the visible seam between cube mapped reflections and screen space reflections.)

The workflow is very different and you have to be very careful how you prepare your models, separate pieces and how you handle UVs. (you can be very lazy with LW about that and be fine.)

Why did I go through all this trouble? Well there is a job we are bidding on that would take years to render with LightWave (hundreds of videos that are variations of the same envinroments and furniture).
The veredict for us was: Yes. It is a viable render engine for iterative content. And, no, it's not faster to make one off animations with it than native LW.

As a side note, I was pleasantly surprised at how compatible the fbx's that come out of modeler are in Unreal, it recognized surface smoothing, all the UVs, and it automatically connects all the nodes for reflection, transparency, normal etc.

ianr
10-10-2017, 09:00 AM
mr.Hurley Posted This on Lightwiki 11 th Oct more sizzling code


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uukrw5raAVc

goakes
10-11-2017, 04:33 PM
Real time ray tracing ????????????