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Blade112
01-19-2017, 09:36 PM
Hello Everyone, I'm new to this and I need some help. I have a Mid 2010 Mac Pro and I want to upgrade my Graphics card, I also would like to know if this would reduce my rendering time? If any one can help me with this I would be very grateful.

bazsa73
01-19-2017, 10:59 PM
Hello Everyone, I'm new to this and I need some help. I have a Mid 2010 Mac Pro and I want to upgrade my Graphics card, I also would like to know if this would reduce my rendering time? If any one can help me with this I would be very grateful.

The short answer is no. If you aim for GPU rendering you'd better buy a new rig (PC) with 2-4 Nvidia titan cards. That will reduce your rendering times big time.

MichaelT
01-20-2017, 01:04 AM
Hello Everyone, I'm new to this and I need some help. I have a Mid 2010 Mac Pro and I want to upgrade my Graphics card, I also would like to know if this would reduce my rendering time? If any one can help me with this I would be very grateful.

It will only reduce your rendering time if your solution allows GPU rendering. Since you ask here, I will assume you are using Octane? Regardless.. If you are able to use it, the GTX 1080 would probably suffice. If you can afford it (and find it, which is easier said than done) then the Titan X pascal (I know, they kept the name for a newer chipset.. really dumb) is easily the faster option. However, the Titan X (pascal) does *not* include the double precision like the previous Titan X supported. If this is important to you, then you need to find the previous version of Titan X.

A good budget version would be the GTX 1070.

Assuming of course that your Apple supports the cards :)

rsfd
01-25-2017, 05:18 AM
Hello Blade112,

as bazsa73 and MichaelT already pointed out, a new GPU will only cut the render times if you are using a GPU-accelerated render engine (Octane, VRay RT, Arion, Maxwell v.4 et al) and a Nvidia graphics card (to my knowledge, every GPU renderer uses Nvidia CUDA so far).
In LightWave, your most obvious advantage will be better frame rates in the viewports and easier handling of larger scenes.

The issue with upgrading a GPU in a classic MacPro is the fact, that you won't get any officially supported graphics card. One, that uses Mac-EFI and therefore gives you the well-known user experience.
If you -as many others- choose to install a Windows-compatible GPU into your Mac, you will loose the ability to use Apple's Startup Manager and the access to the recovery partition.
The Mac boots with a black screen into your user account or into the log-in screen.

Some lower-end GPU are supported by Apple's default drivers, for higher-end Nvidia GPU, you will rely on Nvidia's "Web Driver" that probably will give you some headaches with each OSX or Security Update, as these updates alter OSX's build number and the driver will not be recognized on boot. Unfortunately, it's not possible to install a new driver first and in these cases, you will have to use Single User Mode and Terminal to get everything up and running again.

You should gather as much information prior to buying a PC-GPU (Compatibility, Wattage, Cables, Supported Output ports etc.). (GTX 1070 btw seems incompatible as of now).
Still a good starting point is this thread at the macrumors forum: http://forums.macrumors.com/threads/frequently-asked-questions-about-nvidia-pc-non-efi-graphics-cards.1440150/
A more expensive solution would be to go the route of installing a "flashed" GPU (a PC-GPU with Mac-EFI), e.g. at Macvidcards: http://www.macvidcards.com (Also helpful information on that topic there).

hope, that helps a bit.