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EL Hombre
12-23-2016, 12:40 PM
Why aren't there any up to date tutorials from lynda.com or digital tutors? The Dan Alban lessons from lynda.com is from version 10. Why aren't there LW 2015 specific tutorials from those online lessons sites?

jwiede
12-23-2016, 01:12 PM
Not enough of their customers requesting them is the most probable reason.

jeric_synergy
12-23-2016, 01:42 PM
If you want free uptodate tutes, check the lightwave site itself.

Also, Liberty3d.com for commercial products.

The big sites aren't motivated, but there are artisinal products from individuals. Let me wave you off any Adam Gibson products, unless 2nd hand and very cheap-- they are just not good. But other Liberty3d, Rebel Hill, Ryan Royce, and Dana Burman, are recommended.

Exclaim
12-23-2016, 10:31 PM
Why aren't there any up to date tutorials from lynda.com or digital tutors? The Dan Alban lessons from lynda.com is from version 10. Why aren't there LW 2015 specific tutorials from those online lessons sites?

Its a simple matter of marketing. More users are with Autodesk products (students and professionals). Huge student market as many schools teach it.

Don't worry though, those sites vary in their quality of tutorials. Dan's lessons, although shallow, are much more in depth than some of the 3dsmax tutorials. They had to revise the Lynda Blender tutorials because they were out of date. So don't worry about the quantity, quality is the most important.

adrian
12-24-2016, 04:12 AM
I gave up with Digital Tutors (now Pluralsight) about 6 months ago after even their ZBrush tutorials dried up. I have a free account to Lynda.com through work so it would be nice for some more LW tuts but hey ho. The Dan Ablan course was quite good.

TheLexx
12-24-2016, 05:26 AM
I found myself in exactly the same situation, and there is no one single magic source, but the stuff is definitely out there to be pieced together. You didn't specify, but I'm assuming you want to learn everything (as do I !). Some of the older tutorials are by no means out of date. Grab some of the Lightwave books from Amazon, such as this one (https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/1598220241/ref=dp_olp_used?ie=UTF8&condition=used), nearly 1000 pages and around 14 hours of video on the CD, costing less than $6.00 including US shipping. Similar prices for Dan Ablan, Tim Albee books. I even grabbed the Tareq Mirza VHS (https://www.amazon.com/Modeling-Animating-Human-Head-VHS/dp/B00003NJ9D/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482581989&sr=8-1&keywords=head+modeling+vhs).

Don't be afraid to spend with Liberty3D to learn, and it's not crazy money either (plus 25% sale (http://www.liberty3d.com/) at this very moment till Jan 5th). For me, it is going to be a long and exciting 2017 just with the sheer amount of LW stuff I have now. Also, though the seeming lack of LW tutorials isn't exactly a blessing in disguise, I would balk even more at drowning in the +10,000 Maya tutorials out there. I think we should consider it to be a "half glass full" situation. Good luck.

Julez4001
12-24-2016, 10:22 AM
Ryan Royce and Rebel Hill are superb.
Both have hours of free training on their youtube channel that leads into their commerical version.

jeric_synergy
12-24-2016, 11:02 AM
Ryan Royce and Rebel Hill are superb.
Both have hours of free training on their youtube channel that leads into their commerical version.

:thumbsup:

Ryan Roye
12-26-2016, 09:00 PM
Not enough of their customers requesting them is the most probable reason.

We get plenty of requests at Liberty3d.com. I can't speak for other contributors, but the thing keeping me from continuing to make learning content lies with the substantial changes happening in the next version of lightwave. No producer of commercial learning content wants their stuff to be made nearly, or completely obsolete in such a short period of time. This is especially true for tutorials that will cover topics like:

- Rendering
- Rigging (geometry/mesh stuff)
- Surfacing/texturing
- Available 3rd party tools (we don't know which will work and which won't quite yet. Certain areas of the DP kit are a major concern to a lot of people.)

These are all things that will be deeply affected by the next version of Lightwave and we've already been shown that the interface has undergone some re-arranging as well. Once the next version is in our hands, given a short amount of time to explore the new stuff and changes i'll be glad to get back in gear and start producing content again.

This is also the reason why a lot of my latest stuff covers 3rd party content not quite directly impacted by this update (Octane, Syflex, Realflow, etc).

TheLexx
12-27-2016, 02:54 PM
Hi Ryan, I was just wondering if the software Marvellous Designer is on your radar at all ?

jwiede
12-27-2016, 08:19 PM
We get plenty of requests at Liberty3d.com.

While I get your point, most of the sites' content in question was outdated well before LW.Next was even a "thing". That seems much more likely due to inadequate demand.

Exclaim
12-27-2016, 10:07 PM
While I get your point, most of the sites' content in question was outdated well before LW.Next was even a "thing". That seems much more likely due to inadequate demand.

Or, Lightwave has not changed enough to invalidate the material. Some of the older Lightwave books as mentioned in the thread, are still relevant to most of the latter releases. Lightwave work flow is largely the same. Same goes for 3ds max, Modo, and others.

pinkmouse
12-28-2016, 02:06 AM
...Once the next version is in our hands, given a short amount of time to explore the new stuff and changes i'll be glad to get back in gear and start producing content again...

Indeed. Though I only make short, free tutorials on YT, at a not particularly professional level of presentation, I see no point in expending time on demonstrating something that might change completely at any point.

Ryan Roye
12-28-2016, 09:48 AM
Hi Ryan, I was just wondering if the software Marvellous Designer is on your radar at all ?

No. If I don't use it in my own productions it isn't likely to get covered.

Surrealist.
12-28-2016, 10:38 AM
Why aren't there any up to date tutorials from lynda.com or digital tutors? The Dan Alban lessons from lynda.com is from version 10. Why aren't there LW 2015 specific tutorials from those online lessons sites?

What things would you like a tutorial, or information on? Make it known here (in a separate help thread) and some people may be willing to help in whatever way they can.

hrgiger
12-28-2016, 02:03 PM
I see plenty of LW users requesting tutorials. However, the LW userbase is small compared to some of the other software that you commonly see covered. I use Unreal Engine but good luck finding a lot of tutorials that incorporate using both Unreal and LW. You'll find a few but that's about it. People who spend time making tutorials do so either because they want to give back to the community or they're trying to make some money doing it. There's just not a lot of money in making tutorials for LW so for now at least you just have to rely on generous people taking the time to make content for LightWave. Ryan and Craig being the exceptions to quality paid content.

TheLexx
12-28-2016, 03:25 PM
Ken Brilliant mentioned in one of his books, either Digital Human (https://www.amazon.com/Building-Digital-Human-Graphics-Brilliant/dp/1584502851/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482963059&sr=8-1&keywords=ken+brilliant+human)or Digital Dinosaurs (https://www.amazon.com/Modeling-Digital-Dinosaurs-Graphics-Software/dp/1584502096/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482963047&sr=8-1&keywords=ken+brilliant+dinosaurs), that the same modelling tools for his Lightwave tasks were in all the other major softwares, but just under different names, which means that to an extent tutorials for other software are equally applicable to Lightwave. It's not just about doing a dozen tutorials to do a dozen things, but using any knowledge gained to figure out new things.

At 3DTotal, they list four different PDF tutorials for the same Joan of Arc figure (https://shop.3dtotal.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=joan+od+arc) to model in Lightwave, Softimage, Maya and Cinema 4D. Once a few basic Lightwave tutorials are done, this can be explored further intuitively.

EL Hombre
12-29-2016, 08:15 AM
What things would you like a tutorial, or information on? Make it known here (in a separate help thread) and some people may be willing to help in whatever way they can.

I'm going through a number of tutorials posted on youtube. I'm overwhelmed, there's plenty. I'll start with the basics for now.

Surrealist.
12-29-2016, 09:38 AM
I see. If you want to be specific we'd be glad to help. Are you just trying to get around modeler? Or layout? What are your main interests? Have you come from other software in the past? Are you new to 3D? If you give me some kind of idea, maybe I can whip up some quick vids or point you to something. And others will likely do similar things as time permits.

Just so you know this used to be a thriving community of people helping and a lot of guys around still who are more than happy to help in any way possible.

paulk
12-29-2016, 11:52 AM
I see. If you want to be specific we'd be glad to help. Are you just trying to get around modeler? Or layout? What are your main interests? Have you come from other software in the past? Are you new to 3D? If you give me some kind of idea, maybe I can whip up some quick vids or point you to something. And others will likely do similar things as time permits.

Just so you know this used to be a thriving community of people helping and a lot of guys around still who are more than happy to help in any way possible.

This thread addresses some of my concerns/interests.

LW has always been on my "Someday" list, and I want Someday to be Today. What I'm looking for are tutotials simlar to learning a programming language. You start with the classic "Hello World" program, then variables, arithmetic, decision trees, file i/o, etc. getting more and more complicated. This is my learning style.

I want to get knowledgeable enough with LW basics to get stuck on something new that would be covered by a more specifc tutrorial.

There hasn't been a how-to Lightwave book published since v10. If the older books are still relevant (Good News/Bad News), fine.

I looked at the Getting Started videos on the Newtek site, but they all seem to run under 2 minutes, and end with "For more information, RTFM." I have R'ed the FM, and it feels more like a reference than a training manual. I've considered Adam Gibson's LW 2015 tutorial series, but apparently there are "issues" with them.

Thanks in advance for your help.

jeric_synergy
12-29-2016, 12:05 PM
paulk, I'd recommend any of the Dan Ablan books.

Once upon a time I started a "A stepped approach to 3D modeling" document, which listed a series of progressively more complex objects. You could do this yourself with an IKEA catalog. :)

In general, I've found having a very specific effect/animation/object is the best way to start in the absence of a good, stepped/guided program. There's quite a bit of "blank page syndrome" with any creative tool, because you CAN do virtually anything. But you must start with ONE thing.

Not to break Adam's rice-bowl, but you do well by avoiding his stuff. OTOH, I'd say my favs (RR, RH) are too advanced for you currently. Start with the Ablan stuff, available very VERY cheaply on eBay and used on Amazon.

+++
One other thing: you might do well to start with a LEGO or Fischer-Price aesthetic--- photoreal surfacing is a rabbit-hole with no bottom.

Julez4001
12-29-2016, 01:20 PM
No. If I don't use it in my own productions it isn't likely to get covered.

How's your production coming along, have you made it back to your short?

Spinland
12-29-2016, 01:51 PM
{[T]he same modelling tools for his Lightwave tasks were in all the other major softwares, but just under different names, which means that to an extent tutorials for other software are equally applicable to Lightwave. It's not just about doing a dozen tutorials to do a dozen things, but using any knowledge gained to figure out new things. .

This,

I went through the C4D tutorials to learn TFD, and had no issues extrapolating them into what I needed to do in LW. I'm also reviewing the Allen McKay VFX tutorials that were constructed to teach 3DS Max. Not everything is an exact fit, but the concepts and workflows are useful and lend themselves to sparking my working out how to get those results in LW. Granted, you need to know the rules before you can bend them, but if it's basic LW functions and operations that are hanging you up there is already a raft of materiel that will help you out. I have stuff going back to LW [8] and a great deal of it is completely version agnostic in terms of learning what you need to know in order to accomplish the mission.

Ryan Roye
12-29-2016, 03:39 PM
How's your production coming along, have you made it back to your short?

I probably will starting next year, I got side tracked with commercial stuff.

jwiede
12-29-2016, 06:27 PM
There hasn't been a how-to Lightwave book published since v10. If the older books are still relevant (Good News/Bad News), fine.

My quick rule of thumb is that if the content is prior to LW9 (aside from specific exceptions, such as the Proton/William Vaughn videos (http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?77002-Hours-of-Free-LightWave-Training-(24-Hours-))) it'll probably be more confusing than useful. Most of the William Vaughn videos (follow link above) are still quite relevant -- easiest access for them is to follow the link above, or use the interactive browser (requires Flash) (ftp://ftp.newtek.com/multimedia/movies/w3dw/WV_LightwaveTraining.html).

LW9 added edge support to Modeler, and that significantly impacted efficient modeling workflow in LW. On the Layout side, LW9 was when nodes were integrated (and a fair amount of GUI cleanup was done as a result), and between that and some other changes, tracking pre-LW9 Layout tutorials in modern LW can be a bit tricky/confusing as well. Certain tool-/feature-specific tutorials may still apply, if the tools in question still exist, but following project-oriented tutorials that originated pre-LW9 can get pretty confusing translating to modern LW.

jeric_synergy
12-29-2016, 06:47 PM
AND, you can waste a LOT of time puzzling out such differences: I'm trying to learn C4D with an out of date book, and that's just foolish stubbornness.

(As a reward for completing, I get to start ANOTHER, but up-to-date book...)

Learn from my bad example.

paulk
12-29-2016, 07:44 PM
paulk, I'd recommend any of the Dan Ablan books.

On Amazon.com, Dan Ablan's Inside Lightwave 3D v10 (list price $59.99) is anywhere from $96.80 to $193.59. :p

Even Bernie Madoff didn't offer those kinds of ROI!!

Fortunately, I know somebody who knows somebody . . .

I know what I'm doing to start the New Year!!

jeric_synergy
12-29-2016, 09:12 PM
I have a GOLDMINE on my bookshelves!
135425

Just get the V9 one underneath for $4.10.

What exactly are you trying to learn, for starters?

Exclaim
12-29-2016, 09:15 PM
I wish LW3DG sticky a list of Lightwave books on this forum. Maybe book owners could highlight some of their valuable tips, review, and answer potential buyer's questions...

jeric_synergy
12-29-2016, 10:28 PM
That would kinda work against selling BOOKS, wouldn't it?

BTW, I think that DA book was available on Kindle too.

Surrealist.
12-30-2016, 12:09 AM
Well there are two subjects here. There is the general, universally-applicable technique of 3D and then the basics of one particular program. In the latter, it can help to make some comparisons while learning a new app. Which is why I asked specifically about previous applications.

Also it can be frustrating and time consuming to sift through a lot of videos that claim to cover the basics of a program that, then, actually are covering basics of techniques. There is a stark difference. I point to the "Quick start" section on the LW 3D Group website. Some great videos. But you have to sift through them to find the ones that get you up and running.

The categories could use some better organization.

Here are some by what would be my preferred category as start-ups.:

Modeler - Interface and Basics

https://www.lightwave3d.com/learn/article/quick-start-video-modeler-interface-in-lightwave-3d/
https://www.lightwave3d.com/learn/article/lightwave-modeler-transitioning-tutorial/
https://www.lightwave3d.com/learn/article/lightwave-modeler-interface-beginner-tutorial/
https://www.lightwave3d.com/learn/article/modeling-introduction-to-the-center-view-on-cursor-command/

Layout Interface and Basics

https://www.lightwave3d.com/learn/article/quick-start-video-layout-interface-in-lightwave-3d/
https://www.lightwave3d.com/learn/article/lightwave-layout-interface-beginner-tutorial/
https://www.lightwave3d.com/learn/article/quick-start-video-layout-navigation-in-lightwave-3d/
https://www.lightwave3d.com/learn/article/lightwave-115-workflow-enhancements/

Those are all of the videos I could find that deal with the interface and basics. I think if you started with these it would be a good foundation.

From there it branches out into more specific techniques -- mini project-based tutorials. Rendering, Surfacing etc. But they appear to be more specific than general to me.

So it seems to me that the next needed step would be to go into each area of LightWave Layout and Modeler and highlight them with a similar walk-through of the basics.

Does that seem like a need that has not been filled any of you new guys are interested in? or is there something else?

wingzeta
12-30-2016, 01:08 AM
The Dan Alban Lightwave 10 video course on Lynda.com is more or less exactly what you are looking for. A good run through of the basics, with a lot of good info, logical order. I watched it after having been a LW user for several years, and learned quite a bit, like "I didn't know that control/tool was there! That would have saved me so much time over the years" smack forehead. The interface is still almost the same as version 10. The render controls have changed a little, but most of it still applies. The William Vaughn videos should also be required viewing. All of them.

Surrealist.
12-30-2016, 01:23 AM
Actually between 10 and 11 there are some significant changes to the interface in Modeler (button configs) as well as some new tools. But outside of that, basically correct. And I would agree. A good run though of a course like that is very useful. I also had a Dan Ablan book many years ago. He is very good at what he does.

That course and a good run through of some of the tutorials on the newer tools would be a good start.

paulk
12-30-2016, 04:06 AM
I have a GOLDMINE on my bookshelves!
135425

Just get the V9 one underneath for $4.10.

What exactly are you trying to learn, for starters?

I'm trying to learn EVERYTHING!! :D

Seriously, I'm trying to learn the basics. I want to have a decent grounding in how LW works so I can start to experiment on my own and have SOME idea of what I'm doing.

Just because you can dribble paint on a canvas, you're not Jackson Pollock.

I'm sort of like Dorothy when she begins her journey to Oz. At first, the Yellow Brick Road goes around and around, and Dorothy goes almost nowhere. Then, the road straightens out, and she's On Her Way!

jeric_synergy
12-30-2016, 07:00 PM
You should at least say "I want to build a car out of cubes, and a road, and make the car move along the road."

Reading the manual will get you very little, nor will watching videos. You have to use the tools.

jwiede
12-30-2016, 10:25 PM
I'm trying to learn EVERYTHING!! :D

Seriously, I'm trying to learn the basics. I want to have a decent grounding in how LW works so I can start to experiment on my own and have SOME idea of what I'm doing.

Just because you can dribble paint on a canvas, you're not Jackson Pollock.

I'm sort of like Dorothy when she begins her journey to Oz. At first, the Yellow Brick Road goes around and around, and Dorothy goes almost nowhere. Then, the road straightens out, and she's On Her Way!

Dorothy had a _goal_, she wasn't just walking for the sake of walking. Expertise requires both education _and_ a lot of time spent in practical application.

Start with some basic goals for things you'd like to accomplish and let those goals drive your needs and direction. For example...


Model at least two distinct spaceship "types"/flavors.


Add interesting unique surfacing, wear, etc. to each ship.


Animate them flying around and firing beams (vol. lights-based) at each other.


Have the two ships crash-land (with pfx effects) somewhere.


Model and rig at least two distinct actors (human and non-human).


Animate them exiting their ships, making repairs on them, perhaps even fighting each other.

Even a basic set of goals/steps like the above, as you'll discover, is anything but simple in practice. By the time you work through the above list, you'll have introduced yourself to most of the major Modeler and Layout feature sets and tools.

Just a suggestion, obviously. Do what works best for you, but the important thing is to _do_ something.

jwiede
12-30-2016, 11:33 PM
BTW, I should mention that for the steps I've described there are plenty of tutorial videos for Lightwave to cover each of those steps. I'll provide some Liberty3D content references, but there's also plenty of content from other sources available as well.

Burman's "SpaceToon Vol 1" tutorial (http://www.liberty3d.com/citizens/d-w-burman/danas-videos/space-toon-volume-one/) approaches various spaceship construction and surfacing issues with a cel-shaded look, and even gets into basic animation. I haven't seen this one myself, but have a friend who recommends it highly (as do others here).

I really enjoy all of Kelly ("Kat") Myers' tutorials that I've watched. His "Practical Production Techniques Vol 8 - Capital Ship Combat Techniques" (http://www.liberty3d.com/2014/10/practical-production-techniques-vol-8-tvfilm-vfx-capital-ship-combat-techniques/) provides all sorts of useful info on producing combat effects, destruction fx, etc. with sci-fi flavor. If you want to get really elaborate with pyro fx, definitely also look into his Turbulence FD tutorials (note: requires Turbulence FD, a commercial 'fluids' plugin for Lightwave), I have most and they're excellent as well.

When it comes to using Hypervoxels and ParticleFx for various dust, explosions, and so forth, YouTube has some tutorials (for example, this one (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9U8N5GWWWO4&)), and I'm sure folks in this thread can provide additional references.

For animation, you're probably best off starting with RebelHill's "RHA" (http://www.rebelhill.net/html/rha.html) videos, and you'll want his rigging "RHR" (http://www.rebelhill.net/html/rhr.html) tutorials as well if you intend to pursue rigging in Lightwave. Finally, his nodal tutorials "RHN" (http://www.rebelhill.net/html/rhn.html) are widely-considered as the gold standard for tutorials in Lightwave's Nodes system(s). Pretty much all his tutorials are excellent and extremely worthwhile, plus there are bundle deals if you purchase all three.

There's also plenty of further Lightwave tutorial content out there on both YouTube, Vimeo and other sites. I've cited a few commercial tutorial products I (or my friends) consider well worth the cost, but you can also learn a LOT just by exploring "free" online tutorial content at those sites. I'm sure others will also pipe up with further recommendations and suggestions.

Above all, never be afraid to ask for help here in the forums!

P.S. The colored text above are all links, if it wasn't clear.

Exclaim
12-31-2016, 01:36 AM
Dorothy had a _goal_, she wasn't just walking for the sake of walking. Expertise requires both education _and_ a lot of time spent in practical application.

Start with some basic goals for things you'd like to accomplish and let those goals drive your needs and direction. For example...


Model at least two distinct spaceship "types"/flavors.


Add interesting unique surfacing, wear, etc. to each ship.


Animate them flying around and firing beams (vol. lights-based) at each other.


Have the two ships crash-land (with pfx effects) somewhere.


Model and rig at least two distinct actors (human and non-human).


Animate them exiting their ships, making repairs on them, perhaps even fighting each other.

Even a basic set of goals/steps like the above, as you'll discover, is anything but simple in practice. By the time you work through the above list, you'll have introduced yourself to most of the major Modeler and Layout feature sets and tools.

Just a suggestion, obviously. Do what works best for you, but the important thing is to _do_ something.

Fine example!