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View Full Version : Using lightwave for printing minatures figurines?



Darttman
11-29-2016, 04:03 PM
Hello all!

I have been out of the loop for awhile and was wondering if LW modeler can be used to create fantasy/scifi models that can be translated to be printed with a 3d printer.


Thanks for input!

bazsa73
11-29-2016, 04:19 PM
there is STL export in modeler

rustythe1
11-29-2016, 04:23 PM
its my day job and I use lightwave, so yes, it exports stl and obj, printers understand stl and obj, it also has 3d printing fixing tools now, although I use Netfabb for that, however autodesk recently took over netfabb so the cheap and free versions have been removed and replaced for expensive rental. and by the look of the website they are attempting to kill it off,

zapper1998
11-30-2016, 02:40 AM
Hi there I have a MakerBot Replicator 2x, and Lightwave is an awesome tool to use as a stl generator.


135208


I use Simplify3D to do the work for the printer, and I have the Flashair memory working over the wireless working great


Ordered some 0.03mm nozzles for printing small parts, the 0.04mm nozzles just are to big.
going to order some 0.02mm soon also from amazon


Mike

Darttman
11-30-2016, 01:45 PM
Thanks all for the answers. Interesting LW can be used for this new technology.

spherical
12-01-2016, 12:12 AM
Yes, We've been using it for a lot of prints. Works very well. Some seem to think that 3D printing requires a different type of modelling application. Not so. We get very accurate prints from Modeler.

Here's a couple of pages to get you started:
http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?146766-Need-advice-on-Modelling-for-3D-printing
http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?129505-3D-Printing-Makerbot-and-other-home-Desktop-Printers-Feedback

Then search the forum using Advanced Search > Search Single Content Type for "3D Printing". There'll be a lot to go through. The second link above is 15 pages at 40 posts per page.

prometheus
12-01-2016, 11:41 AM
Do you guys have any idea of what speed difference there would be approximately, when using a nozzle at 0.02mm VS 0.05mm?

spherical
12-03-2016, 12:11 AM
Well, it's a volume equation... The wider the extrusion, the fewer circuits required to create a given wall thickness; providing that wall thickness is the goal. There are many factors in 3D printing that determine a certain sweet spot; depending upon that which are the ultimate parameters and the ultimate goal. IOW, wall thickness may not be pertinent in a given situation, while resolution and/or strength may be.

robertoortiz
12-03-2016, 06:57 AM
I have done a ton of figure 3d printing with LW.


Here is some of my work. I want to agree with all that has been sadi that LW is a great app to generate Stls.


135221135220135219

jwiede
12-04-2016, 03:07 PM
Well, it's a volume equation... The wider the extrusion, the fewer circuits required to create a given wall thickness; providing that wall thickness is the goal. There are many factors in 3D printing that determine a certain sweet spot; depending upon that which are the ultimate parameters and the ultimate goal. IOW, wall thickness may not be pertinent in a given situation, while resolution and/or strength may be.

Also important to realize that as output volume drops, the rate of cooling for volume deposited rises significantly faster (cubed proportions). You have to be more mindful of how long each layer takes and/or how long before the print head comes back to do adjacent areas, because the smaller nozzle's reduced output volume temp will have dropped further, which can impact inter-layer and inter-path attachment. If your printer includes a fan directed at the print head for print cooling (not the same as hot end fan), you might want to try some tests with it off and on to see how much it impacts the lesser output volume.

Oh, and if you're a fan of using composite materials (carbon fibre + PLA, etc.) you should know that smaller nozzles are more likely to clog or get blocked with composites. Also, as many composites produce greater wear on nozzles, be aware that the smaller the nozzle area, the proportionately greater nozzle wear likely from abrasive composite materials.

I actually have 0.2/0.3/0.4/0.6/0.8 nozzles for both my (mildly-modified) Printrbot Metal Simple and my (heavily-modified) MakerFarm i3v Prusa, and change them depending on what I'm trying to do. For fine work, having a smaller output volume is definitely a benefit, as long as you realize large-area-per-layer work will be impaired by the greater cooling. I use either Simplify3D or Kiss as my slicer, and just moved to OctoPrint-based job mgmt. for the printers themselves (I have a RaspPi-based wifi OctoPrint front-end on each printer).