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Amerelium
11-24-2016, 02:41 AM
...so I was wondering: Everyone talks about using UV textures.

I have always found them to be a pain.

Why use them over the other 'regular' texturing options in Modeler (seems so much easier) ?

Danner
11-24-2016, 02:54 AM
Some things are impossible to do without UVs. (exact wrapping of a painted face onto an geometry for example) And other things are easier with UVs. Like scaling a single texture on different parts of an object, You can do it without UVs but not while retaining the same surface.

Skonk
11-24-2016, 03:17 AM
Anything destined to go into a real-time engine (game engines etc) will need to be UV'd; not really any way around it.

Surrealist.
11-24-2016, 03:47 AM
The difference is basically procedural texturing. Or Image texturing. An image can be projected along any of the options other than UV. But this is limited to LightWave. Meaning if you export to another application you will have to set up the projections again. Or as mentioned a game requires UVs.

Procedural texturing is not all together horrible. Just depends on the effect you want and how good you are at it. If you good you can do a lot of realistic organic and wear and tear looks, rust, scratches etc.

S0nny
11-24-2016, 06:05 AM
UVs are tedious and painful, no doubt, but unless you are working only with primitive like rectangles, cylinders, spheres or others very regular shapes, it's not something you can avoid.

Thinks about mapping a simple pillow with some foldings with the traditional non-uv planar or cubic mapping. Everything with an irregular shape like clothes, fabrics, furnitures, characters, trees, vegetation in general, food, vehicles, anything with stickers or graphics, etc etc is something that requires UVs.

It also depends on the output, if you are working for gaming assets, RT engines, or exchanging assest in other softwares like substance painter or other render engines, or Maya. Basically in any actual production pipeline UVs are just essential as anything else.

hrgiger
11-24-2016, 06:36 AM
I'm one of those weird people that actually enjoy doing UVs. But LightWave UV tools are lacking. I either do UV maps in 3DCoat or Modo. LightWave UV tools can be used for simple things but anything where I need specific UV layouts I have to use something else.

Surrealist.
11-24-2016, 06:53 AM
Yeah that is a good point. If you are judging the difficulty of doing UVs base on LW tools, it is a pain. But just depends what other apps you have access to I suppose. I do all of my UV in Blender or Maya. Blender mostly lately. But either one is about as good. LW tools are non-existent by comparison.

But also that all said. UVs are a learned discipline. No doubt. You should learn some good techniques or it will be a real pain no matter where you do them. Auto UV tools are OK for some things. But you really need to learn the skill set.

bazsa73
11-24-2016, 07:16 AM
...so I was wondering: Everyone talks about using UV textures.

I have always found them to be a pain.

Why use them over the other 'regular' texturing options in Modeler (seems so much easier) ?

It's not so bad, you can make wonders even with LW's native ABF unwrapper.
Select your object or better if you select one piece and put it onto a new layer.
Change to edge selection.
Select some edges which seems logical to cut the object. The algorithm will cut the mesh along these edges and unwraps your mesh.
If your model contains several similar pieces you can copy paste UVs of one piece onto the rest. It's all out there.

Norka
11-24-2016, 08:02 AM
I'm with hrgiger. I love makin' UVs. Amerelium, if and when you get a solid grasp on UVs, a huge new world is waiting for you. And once you are in Substance Painter or Quixel Suite, using color ID maps for your pieces/parts, you will poop your pants. Bring a box of DependŽ, if this day should ever come...

bazsa73
11-25-2016, 12:01 AM
6 UV tips
http://www.cgsociety.org/news/article/2841/6-tips-to-improve-your-uv-mapping-workflow

Thomas Leitner
11-25-2016, 02:31 AM
6 UV tips
http://www.cgsociety.org/news/article/2841/6-tips-to-improve-your-uv-mapping-workflow

Hi,
keep in mind that some of this tips are for a maya workflow and are not necessary in Lightwave.

ciao
Thomas

bobakabob
11-25-2016, 09:58 AM
It's not so bad, you can make wonders even with LW's native ABF unwrapper.
Select your object or better if you select one piece and put it onto a new layer.
Change to edge selection.
Select some edges which seems logical to cut the object. The algorithm will cut the mesh along these edges and unwraps your mesh.
If your model contains several similar pieces you can copy paste UVs of one piece onto the rest. It's all out there.

Yep, UVs are easier to deal with in LW these days. You can do an awful lot of work UVing in Lightwave without using software other than Photoshop style image editors for textures.

As basza states unwrap is good (especially for organic models) and the atlas and planar approaches can be very simple but powerful. Agree with Norka and hrgiger, it's actually fun to work with uvs and bring your model into the next realm. It's certainly worth throwing yourself in there and following tutorials.

Although it's best to keep things simple you don't need to stick to 1 uv map per object in LW. You can create multiple uv maps or assign them to individually named surfaces. The only issue with the former method is this doesn't play well with other apps - ZB doesn't like multiple maps.

Apps like Zbrush, Mudbox, 3dCoat are especially powerful as you can paint directly onto your models in 3d. In ZB unwrap is really quick and you can also work in Photoshop if you wish with this approach.

If you're in a hurry, it can be as fast as simply pressing a button in ZB - GUV tiles or example - to auto UV your model. You can then export your painted model as an fbx file which will load in LW with textures in place saving quite a bit of work. The only downside with this is that the maps can't be edited too well in Photoshop as they look like scrambled jigsaws.

jeric_synergy
11-25-2016, 12:36 PM
Just another example: imagine a pipe that winds around in mid-air, that is checkered. No axial projection would accomodate that mesh, but it's quite simple to UV.

OR, better, a bullwhip with that braided look, curled around in mind-air.

bazsa73
11-25-2016, 01:21 PM
Hi,
keep in mind that some of this tips are for a maya workflow and are not necessary in Lightwave.

ciao
Thomas

I just copy/pasted it from the newsletter. Maybe he finds something useful in it generally. Or not.

tischbein3
11-25-2016, 01:38 PM
But also that all said. UVs are a learned discipline. No doubt. You should learn some good techniques or it will be a real pain no matter where you do them. Auto UV tools are OK for some things. But you really need to learn the skill set.

Quoted for agreement and emphasis.
Planar/Cubic etc.. projections are somewhat false friends:
Easy and fast to archive a certain quality level, but if you want to go beyond that they start to hold you back.

MarcusM
11-25-2016, 02:02 PM
Doing good UV mapping need time to learn... yes it is pain. I remember time when i dont know nothing about it and knew that this is basic thing that 3d artist must know. Then was times when UV maping took the same time as modeling. Now i doing maping with closed eyes :p
My last models:
http://marekmajchrzak.blogspot.com/2016/11/patria-amv-inside-low-poly.html
http://marekmajchrzak.blogspot.com/2016/11/rpg-26-low-poly.html