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jeric_synergy
11-07-2016, 12:52 AM
Just saw "Kubo etc"....I'm kinda wondering why they bothered with any stop motion at all. The action is totally smooth, really outstanding, but it's impossible, to me at least, to differentiate* it from CGI.




*not the word I want, but I can't come up with the proper one: "to tell the difference".

gerry_g
11-07-2016, 03:12 AM
probably because CG is still crap at somethings, cloth still looks like a sheet of thick rubber half the time despite there being some really good solvers out there, hair is very hard or at least time consuming, and the look of real light on real surfaces in a real environment is still tough, then there is the psychological stuff, studies have shown 24/5 frames a second film is more satisfying than 60 fps people try to do with digital film making, and the imperfection of a hand animated stop motion character affects us differently to seeing something digitally animated.

Thomas Leitner
11-07-2016, 05:51 AM
Because Travis Knight makes Stop motion and not 3D.

ciao
Thomas

jeric_synergy
11-07-2016, 09:14 AM
YMMV, but it was so slick and smooth, it lost the charm of stop motion.

KurtF
11-07-2016, 08:08 PM
If you were watching the technique and not the story, then they failed in a much bigger way.

I've loved everything Laika has put out, Coraline, ParaNorman, Kubo, all fantastic pieces.

jeric_synergy
11-07-2016, 08:16 PM
Well, I think an experienced animator is going to see both at the same time. The fluidity of the characters' movements was, really, awe-inspiring, but for me, CGI-ish. They definitely "came to life", but as a choice of medium I don't get it.

As usual, the villains stole the show.

samurai_x
11-07-2016, 08:28 PM
Because Travis Knight makes Stop motion and not 3D.

ciao
Thomas

They do use 3d a lot.
A Laika artist was a guest at the last zbrush summit where he shows some behind the scenes.

Thomas Leitner
11-08-2016, 01:36 AM
They do use 3d a lot....
You missed the sence.
I know they used 3D.
The point is: Travis Knight is a stop motion artist and his thing is stop motion.


YMMV, but it was so slick and smooth, it lost the charm of stop motion.
Maybe Travis Knight is a bad stop motion artist?

ciao
Thomas

bazsa73
11-08-2016, 02:48 AM
You missed the sence.
I know they used 3D.
The point is: Travis Knight is a stop motion artist and his thing is stop motion.


Maybe Travis Knight is a bad stop motion artist?

ciao
Thomas
Stop-mo should be jerky! :D

samurai_x
11-08-2016, 02:57 AM
You missed the sence.
I know they used 3D.
The point is: Travis Knight is a stop motion artist and his thing is stop motion.

ciao
Thomas

Sense of humor?
Senseless?
Sensei?

jeric_synergy
11-08-2016, 08:46 AM
The point is: Travis Knight is a stop motion artist and his thing is stop motion.

Maybe Travis Knight is a bad stop motion artist?

Not at all, he's a superlative SMA, but: it's like when a painter paints a completely photo-realistic painting. IMO, pointless: we have cameras.

Anything better than "Robot Chicken" (they've gotten very good) is technical wankery. YMMV , :D .

I think the UK term for this is "He's over-egged the pudding."

Thomas Leitner
11-09-2016, 06:21 AM
Not at all, he's a superlative SMA, but: it's like when a painter paints a completely photo-realistic painting. IMO, pointless: we have cameras....

This would mean that CG is the better method to make such films.
Why?

For example, the money, a main argument for the North American film industry:
We have no detailed figures, but the costs of Kubo seem to be far lower as the costs of its CG colleagues (one half and less).

ciao
Thomas

jeric_synergy
11-09-2016, 09:38 AM
Well, that's certainly a valid argument, e$pecially in thi$ neck of the wood$. (Dang, 'organic' words lacked "s"s.)