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VonBon
08-09-2016, 03:44 PM
So I just bought DOOM, and come to find out that it runs
using Open-GL. The game looks good in my opinion and is
probably the best running game I've played when it comes
to frame rates.

So, is it possible to get the same Open-GL Look & performance
in a program like LightWave, or are they two entirely different beast?

jasonwestmas
08-09-2016, 07:40 PM
A game engine is much more sophisticated than lightwave's real time capabilities. Just know that Doom runs at 60 FPS and you would get closer to that look just using the VPR renderer or the classic LW renderer.

Ryan Roye
08-09-2016, 09:01 PM
Different beast. Yes the viewports in Unity and Unreal look beautiful and have a high level of interactivity to them but there are plenty of tradeoffs that keep people from ditching typical production applications like Lightwave over them. Try out the sample content in both applications and you'll notice very high load times (especially with unreal), long calculating times for processing interactive lighting/reflections, and other things that make the applications far less flexible for the purposes of making CGI for compositing and/or video.

jasonwestmas
08-10-2016, 07:35 AM
Different beast. Yes the viewports in Unity and Unreal look beautiful and have a high level of interactivity to them but there are plenty of tradeoffs that keep people from ditching typical production applications like Lightwave over them. Try out the sample content in both applications and you'll notice very high load times (especially with unreal), long calculating times for processing interactive lighting/reflections, and other things that make the applications far less flexible for the purposes of making CGI for compositing and/or video.

Maybe I'm mistaken but I think VonBon was looking to take advantage of lightwave's capabilities to match merely the look of a next gen video game. I don't see why he couldn't do that with just software rendering.

Surrealist.
08-12-2016, 03:11 AM
The key is not just in the view port but the underlying tech of the game engine itself which ships with the game. There are shaders that have been designed and optimized for real time playback and interaction for example as well as real time lighting schemes etc.

The considerations for making cinematic however are a different concern entirely.

But achieving the look in LightWave or other is going to be the same as with anything. Lighting and materials. Of course not to mention great content.

That is the key to making great cinematics in a game engine such as Unreal.

I think it is better than 80 percent of the equation. The other 20 percent is the trad off on materials, Lighting etc. Currently none of the game engines I am aware of output .exr frames. (could be wrong about that( Cryengine lists them in the docs but they are not yet supported. And in Unreal it is .png, jpeg or .bmp. So basically you won't be exporting passes for compositing. Well you could. But it would not be as good as a linear workflow.

That said there is a lot that can be created in a game engine. It is just a matter of having great content to start with and learn how to work around the limitations and live with them.

I have played around with this a lot lately and I really enjoy working in Unreal.

Some very quick tests. Most of the time was just getting the scenes set up with textures and materials. Mostly things I had to hand I could use. The tunnel thing was a combination of lights and effects from the reflection scene in the learning library and my own actual tunnel object mixed with a few other things from that scene.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJKjOF3VBcE