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View Full Version : Time to get physical [scientifically speaking].



cove
07-23-2016, 02:38 PM
I know this is a bit off topic but thought the following link maybe usefull to some of you more technical
users of lightwave and to every one generally.

The are times when even tech support may have trouble answering
questions about the real world physics associated with some of Lightwaves features.


Here is a usefull link to a public forum were anyone can ask a physics question.
Ive sent them 3 questions in the last 18 months and got replies too all three. 2 of which i understood the
3rd one im still struggling with [a bit to techy].

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http://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Department of Physics
---------------------------------------

Check this site out its well worth a visit.

Hint.
Type in any search term [near top of window] relating to your particular subject eg Comets/gravity/rainbows etc etc and look at the answers given.
All facinating stuff.

Sensei
07-23-2016, 08:21 PM
Went to your link, and...

"Question of the Day

"when the speed of a car doubles, why is the breaking distance more than double?"
-valerie lau (age 15)"

WTF?!
I heard that US schools are good...
It's hilarious/tragedy..
Somebody who don't know answer for this would still be in Polish primary school (at least I still hope so).. would not pass to high school.. nor university..




If somebody would like to learn more about radioactivity,
I just made Android smartphone/tablet application,
called Decay Energy Calculator
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=eu.trueart.www.decayenergycalculator

After you enter number of protons (Z), name of element (f.e. Helium), or shortcut of element (f.e. Pb), it'll show full name of element, with average mass (in mass atomic unit), and what A (Mass Number are available for the element),
then you enter Mass Number,
f.e. Uranium 238, U 238, or 92 238 (equivalent inputs).
And it'll show the all plausible decay modes isotope is decaying.
for Uranium 238 plausible decay modes are double beta decay minus, and alpha decay.
Uranium-238 -> Thorium-234 + alpha + 4.26992 MeV
(double beta decay minus can also mean random neutrinoless beta decay).
Application will also calculate energy released during decay of unstable isotope.

After enabling option in drop-down menu, you can see why decay mode is not possible (negative decay energy, meaning decay mode would require to supply energy to split element/isotope).
f.e. Deuterium (Hydrogen-2) needs 2.22 MeV energy to be destroyed:
H-2 + 2.22 MeV -> p+ + n0
Newly produced particles are free proton and free neutron.
Neutron is unstable particle with half-life around 10 minutes, and mean-life 15 minutes, so soon after being made will have to be captured by some other element/isotope, or it'll turn back to free proton:
n0 -> p+ + e- + Ve + 0.782 MeV
releasing electron, antineutrino and energy in reaction.

50one
07-24-2016, 02:01 AM
^ depends who you ask. Doesn't matter what country and education system you have. i used to go to high school with dude that could barely read... Truth is 3/4 people on this planet are a bit dumb or educated dumb - meaning that they are specialised in one domain and know nothing outside their scope of duties.

cove
07-24-2016, 05:56 AM
Went to your link, and...

"Question of the Day

"when the speed of a car doubles, why is the breaking distance more than double?"
-valerie lau (age 15)"

WTF?!
I heard that US schools are good...
It's hilarious/tragedy..
Somebody who don't know answer for this would still be in Polish primary school (at least I still hope so).. would not pass to high school.. nor university..




If somebody would like to learn more about radioactivity,
I just made Android smartphone/tablet application,
called Decay Energy Calculator
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=eu.trueart.www.decayenergycalculator

After you enter number of protons (Z), name of element (f.e. Helium), or shortcut of element (f.e. Pb), it'll show full name of element, with average mass (in mass atomic unit), and what A (Mass Number are available for the element),
then you enter Mass Number,
f.e. Uranium 238, U 238, or 92 238 (equivalent inputs).
And it'll show the all plausible decay modes isotope is decaying.
for Uranium 238 plausible decay modes are double beta decay minus, and alpha decay.
Uranium-238 -> Thorium-234 + alpha + 4.26992 MeV
(double beta decay minus can also mean random neutrinoless beta decay).
Application will also calculate energy released during decay of unstable isotope.

After enabling option in drop-down menu, you can see why decay mode is not possible (negative decay energy, meaning decay mode would require to supply energy to split element/isotope).
f.e. Deuterium (Hydrogen-2) needs 2.22 MeV energy to be destroyed:
H-2 + 2.22 MeV -> p+ + n0
Newly produced particles are free proton and free neutron.
Neutron is unstable particle with half-life around 10 minutes, and mean-life 15 minutes, so soon after being made will have to be captured by some other element/isotope, or it'll turn back to free proton:
n0 -> p+ + e- + Ve + 0.782 MeV
releasing electron, antineutrino and energy in reaction.

Thanks for showing that there are alternative ways to gain information.

Your sweeping statement that all US schools are just plain bad.
There are good and not so good schools in all countries.
As for your critisizing the 15 year old kid who did not know the answer to a particular question and because this kid did not know
you say that this kid would be better placed in some remote
school for stupid kids in poland.
Just to let you know and bring you up to date.
Kids in the modern day Polish education system end up excelling in a lots of subjects and are better educated than kids in other countries.
Check out this link---
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What the U.S. could learn from the Polish education system - USA Today

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/08/12/ozy-polish-education-system/13949837/
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There is a new "Question of the day" here

http://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/
--------------------------------------------------------------
Did you type your query word "radioactivity" in to search field?
I did and there were a few interesting replies.
I also typed in a few other terms that are in you reply
eg. Protons/ isotope is decaying/energy.
There maybe reply,s here that will add to what you know already.
I also typed in commen lightwave phrases eg Particle emitter/Fluid dynamics and even, just for the hell of it, typed in "Bullit physics"
Lots of answers shown in replies.
Which all goes to show that if you want to understand physics better
so you can produce more realistic dynamic animations in lightwave then
the site refered to could help.