PDA

View Full Version : Lino - Why would you bone rig mechanical characters?



Julez4001
03-26-2016, 06:28 AM
Lino, (or anyone else wants to jump in)
Why would you want to rig mechanical spiders (or any other hard body surface) with bones versus rigging each component?

Also in LW 2015 demo video I notice the (boned) mech spider has wires that seem to jiggle as it was taking steps, how was that setup?

Julez4001
03-26-2016, 06:31 AM
Alright I just saw a picture and saw bones were on the wire. Is the bones in that setup using cstom expression for jiggling, Bullet or is there a quick plugin for that?

RebelHill
03-26-2016, 06:53 AM
You do it with bones because managing all those parts and their pivot points (not to mention their associated LRAs) is a nightmare... hard weighting each "block" and using bones is FAR simpler. Regarding the spider, I think its the lil pistons that have bones, I believe the wires are just simple soft/cloth/bullet/whatever dynamics.

hrgiger
03-26-2016, 06:54 AM
Probably the new bone dynamics in lw 2015.

Julez4001
03-26-2016, 10:56 AM
Are there tutorials on Bone rigging Pistons?

meshpig
03-26-2016, 11:18 AM
You don't need to bone rig pistons, just use IK and a baking tool like mentalfish's LS. Bones and weightmaps are good for mechanical .fbx export as you can accommodate many moving parts on one layer.

RebelHill
03-26-2016, 02:56 PM
Are there tutorials on Bone rigging Pistons?

Sure... bone one side, bone the other, target them at each other.

erikals
03-27-2016, 09:50 AM
and again, for reference, Robotic Movements

need to make a new list, an updated one, never the less... >

http://forums.newtek.com/archive/index.php/t-97659

jeric_synergy
03-27-2016, 12:38 PM
Sure... bone one side, bone the other, target them at each other.
It's little techniques like that that causes auto-concussion. Sometimes the desk, sometimes heel of the hand.....

lino.grandi
03-28-2016, 02:34 AM
Lino, (or anyone else wants to jump in)
Why would you want to rig mechanical spiders (or any other hard body surface) with bones versus rigging each component?

Also in LW 2015 demo video I notice the (boned) mech spider has wires that seem to jiggle as it was taking steps, how was that setup?

There are several reasons why you may want to do that.

As Craig said, dealing with just objects pivot can be a nightmare as a hierarchy complexity level raises up.
Using bones is a great way to decouple the Pivot from the Geometry, and makes easier to modify both quite independently.

Meshes are parented to the bones, so there's no slow down due to having to deal with a deforming mesh.

It is also possible to define "rigid" weights, so even if you have the objects all in a single layer, you'll have just one bone affecting well defined vertexes. In this case calculating the deformation takes very little time (you can find examples of the 2 different solution in the content).

Genoma2 let's you define which object should be parented to a bone, which facilitates this kind of setup.

The "dynamic" effect in the animation has been done connecting the original IK/FK rig to a dynamic setup (almost totally controlled by dynamics).

Don't remember is the tubes are softbodies or dynamic bones. The latter are faster to calculate for sure.

Tobian
03-28-2016, 09:32 AM
There's nothing wrong with this approach to rigging a mechanical system, and I know from personal experience setting up hundreds of layers for 'moving' parts can be a big pain, but the only downside is deforming meshes won't work well with interpolated radiosity, so you'd have to use direct lighting/brute force radiosity lighting.

jeric_synergy
03-28-2016, 12:52 PM
Even deforming parts that aren't literally deforming?

Tobian
03-28-2016, 03:36 PM
It still counts as a deform to the system, because they are being transformed by a deformation, not by parts which are being translated. Animated radiosity cache works with translation but not deformation, the fact it doesn't look like deformation is not relevant, sadly.

Julez4001
03-28-2016, 03:51 PM
If meshes are parented to bones then they are not deforming.

Is the example scenes in 11.5 or 2015 content?

Ztreem
03-28-2016, 07:16 PM
There's nothing wrong with this approach to rigging a mechanical system, and I know from personal experience setting up hundreds of layers for 'moving' parts can be a big pain, but the only downside is deforming meshes won't work well with interpolated radiosity, so you'd have to use direct lighting/brute force radiosity lighting.

Not many animations works with interpolated radiosity. I've stopped using interpolated for animation several years ago. Takes too much time to setup and usually ends up in blotches or undefined shadows. Brute force is the way for animations.