PDA

View Full Version : What do you use for your remote production video uplinks?



GThomas
01-25-2016, 09:34 PM
Our organization does simple web broadcasts to YouTube live of live high school sporting events. We are looking at possibly taking some of those broadcasts on the road next year to opposing schools. My question to everyone is: what do you use for your remote uplinks? We are looking at broadcasting from some rural areas (we're talking a football field in the middle of the North Dakota prairie) where the host venue cannot provide any sort of wired internet feed, like we have at our school.


What technology do you use for your video uplink?
Do you own/lease/rent the device?
What is the startup cost?
What is the monthly/per broadcast fee?

imryh
01-26-2016, 04:20 AM
Hi Gabe.

In general, you can use either a standalone cellular modem/hot-spot, or a bonded cellular solution.
We've used both, with varying results.

Last year, for most of our rowing broadcasts we used a Verizon 4G JetPack hotspot. It was affordable and easy to use. However, the connection was inconsistent and patchy where Verizon didn't have great service.

This year, we're going to be using a TVU backpack. It uses 6 combined cell networks to transmit a high bandwidth signal in any location. It's not cheap ($1,000-$2,000 per month to rent the gear, which comes with a subscription to 6 cell networks) but it's very reliable. We tried it out last year, and loved it. Great connection, and great customer support. Live-U makes a similar solution. Again, not cheap, but can be counted on to work anywhere.

I hope this helps.

Imry

Radio_TVPat1982
01-26-2016, 06:38 AM
To echo what Imry was saying, I have seen similar setups. For high school football season I normally try to check out the setup for the opposing broadcast teams. In Georgia many schools have started their own student/staff broadcast. Most only do home games but some do both road and home.

We have pretty good Verizon coverage in most areas and they typically use the Hotspots to broadcast especially on the road. I have been told that the schools can get a deal on an unlimited plan for 4G coverage.

For anyone that does not trust a single cellular connection bonded internet is probably a good way to go but will increase the cost.
Teradak offers several options for bonded internet. I have also heard good things on the Live-U.
http://teradek.com/collections/bond

I did have one more option and that is a point to point connection. I saw it used in two setups, one for college and one for high school. Basically there were two connections setup. One at the school and one a several hundred feet away at the football press box. The internet signal is sent from the school to the box through (I think) an RF transmitter. I heard they are good at about 1000 or more feet straight line of sight. Getting through a schools firewall may serve as the biggest challenge for this option.

GThomas
01-27-2016, 06:20 PM
Thanks for the info Imryh and Radio_TVPat1982.

Imry, When you guys use the TVU, does someone have to be at your broadcast headquarters on campus to take the stream in and re-encode it to your provider? Or, do you stream to a TVU cloud server, and then they combine the signals into 1 RMTP stream that can be sent to Ustream or YouTube Live?

Thanks!

Gabe

imryh
01-27-2016, 07:19 PM
Hi Gabe.

Both are options, but we've always used TVU's cloud server solution. Cuts down on our staffing and logistics needs.

Imry

MBrooks
02-06-2016, 05:03 AM
Hello Gabe.

I have found that a jetpack works well (usually) in urban conditions, but iffy in rural ones. What I have noticed is that most schools have excellent internet, just not at the stadium. We often use a line of sight bridge with Ubiquiti Nanostations on tripods. It needs line of sight, but from the top of pressboxes, that is usually is not a problem. The nanostation is overkill for the ranges we normally do, but I have set it up 1/2 mile away or more with no problem maintaining exceptionally high up and down speeds. There is plenty of documentation on the ubiquity website on how to set up the bridge, and they have great costumer service. For about 170 bucks you have a solution that will work at almost all venues that have a wired connection somewhere. We even have used it inside gyms and auditoriums to avoid long internet cable runs.

inforum
02-08-2016, 02:40 PM
We use a Dejero GoBox and have had mixed results but we typically broadcast from HEAVILY saturated cellular environments (All NDSU football games, etc). In some cases we've had to resort to just sending back a static cam + audio and handling all graphics back in-studio.

As crowd numbers go down bandwidth headroom goes up and we've had excellent transmission. I'd imagine high school games would be fine on a device like this but would definitely do some testing with realistic gameday conditions.

We lease the box and it has been upgraded several times since we started with them so that is nice but the billing is done based on bandwidth used. Long programs tend to get expensive if sending 720p back.

GThomas
02-08-2016, 03:51 PM
Hello Gabe.

I have found that a jetpack works well (usually) in urban conditions, but iffy in rural ones. What I have noticed is that most schools have excellent internet, just not at the stadium. We often use a line of sight bridge with Ubiquiti Nanostations on tripods. It needs line of sight, but from the top of pressboxes, that is usually is not a problem. The nanostation is overkill for the ranges we normally do, but I have set it up 1/2 mile away or more with no problem maintaining exceptionally high up and down speeds. There is plenty of documentation on the ubiquity website on how to set up the bridge, and they have great costumer service. For about 170 bucks you have a solution that will work at almost all venues that have a wired connection somewhere. We even have used it inside gyms and auditoriums to avoid long internet cable runs.

Thanks for the info, Mike. We are looking at fields in places without any internet around, but that's a great idea should we run into a situation with something like that.

Thanks!

- - - Updated - - -


We use a Dejero GoBox and have had mixed results but we typically broadcast from HEAVILY saturated cellular environments (All NDSU football games, etc). In some cases we've had to resort to just sending back a static cam + audio and handling all graphics back in-studio.

As crowd numbers go down bandwidth headroom goes up and we've had excellent transmission. I'd imagine high school games would be fine on a device like this but would definitely do some testing with realistic gameday conditions.

We lease the box and it has been upgraded several times since we started with them so that is nice but the billing is done based on bandwidth used. Long programs tend to get expensive if sending 720p back.

Thanks for the information. So do you pay a monthly lease fee plus a per hour bandwidth fee?

inforum
02-09-2016, 03:31 PM
Thanks for the information. So do you pay a monthly lease fee plus a per hour bandwidth fee?
Yes. Monthly fee and bandwidth is billed on the amount consumed not based on the length of the broadcast (of course length of broadcast is a variable in how much data is consumed). Similar to a data plan for a phone. I did not sign/negotiate the contract but I believe we are allocated a certain amount of bandwidth for the month and then incur fixed charges when any overages occur.