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THREEL
01-01-2016, 11:13 AM
Happy New Year, everyone!!! I was wondering what video codec my fellow Lightwavers use when rendering an animation to AVI on a PC? I've tried a couple of different ones in the options and neither one worked for me. None of my video players will play the end results and I cannot bring it into my NLE software. I'm using Windows 10.

Thanks!

ernpchan
01-01-2016, 11:19 AM
If this is for final renders I would recommend rendering to an image sequence instead of directly to a movie file. If you're saving previews out I like to save to QT. The PNG codec is a good one.

Kryslin
01-01-2016, 11:32 AM
I use xvid for saving previews - the default settings give decent results. For final frames - I render out each frame, and load that into whatever editing package I'm using.

Kaptive
01-01-2016, 12:11 PM
Same as the others.

When it comes to rendering out the edit (in Premiere or whatever...) The best general use codec/format is H.264 Mpeg4... in terms of size, quality.

If you don't have an editing program that can compile all the frames into a single sequence, I just found the following... (direct link to download)

http://mirror2.cze.cz/imagestovideo/ImagesToVideo.zip


Tried it and it works fine. Leave most settings as they are, but change:

Your folder containing images (at top) as well as Video destination (at the bottom).

Change "Sort images by", from "creation time" to "file name".

Change the "Search for" to whatever format you render to. If jpeg, then leave as it is.

In the video panel change to mpeg4, default quality is fine. Set your frames per second, 24/25.

Then on the first panel again, click "Convert images to video" and it'll render it out for you.

roboman
01-01-2016, 01:29 PM
I always render out to an image sequence and then use another program to compile the images into an avi. That lets me try out different ones and different levels of compression. Sometimes I use Premiere or another video editor. Other times I'll use The RAD Video Tools. The Rad games Video tools let you play with all the settings, edit in sound and even compile the video to an exe (nice to send to a client before they pay, it doesn't use a codec, so it will always play and they can't really do any thing with it except play the video). It is a text based thing though, not a graphics interface. http://www.radgametools.com/bnkdown.htm

prometheus
01-01-2016, 02:03 PM
fusion7 is also free and should do the job...
it says fusion 8..which isnīt free..but click on the download button anyway, and you will get a popup screen to choose the free fusion7 version...
https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/fusion

Ztreem
01-01-2016, 03:54 PM
fusion7 is also free and should do the job...
it says fusion 8..which isnīt free..but click on the download button anyway, and you will get a popup screen to choose the free fusion7 version...
https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/fusion

Fusion 8 beta is free, just like 7.

Surrealist.
01-02-2016, 12:07 AM
Happy New Year, everyone!!! I was wondering what video codec my fellow Lightwavers use when rendering an animation to AVI on a PC? I've tried a couple of different ones in the options and neither one worked for me. None of my video players will play the end results and I cannot bring it into my NLE software. I'm using Windows 10.

Thanks!
There do not seem to be a lot of options for .avi in LightWave. But Microsoft Video1 is the one I have used for compression. Otherwise just try Full Frames Uncompressed. Those should load in your NLE if you are using Vegas for example. And on my machine it plays in media player.

Also I think I have used QT in the past and you have more options there. It will require QT be installed on your machine.

For convenience sake I render things to anim quite a lot, just to save time and hassle and get to the point for tests.

If you are having issues it might be to do with codecs - or lack of - on your machine.

MonroePoteet
01-02-2016, 08:20 AM
I (almost) always render to TGA sequences, then use the open-source FFMPEG to convert them to MPG for previewing. Here's a WikiBooks article on how to do so:

https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/FFMPEG_An_Intermediate_Guide/image_sequence

and FFMPEG is available here:

https://www.ffmpeg.org/

I don't know if it'll work on Windows 10, but since the FFMPEG command line can become very complex, I wrote a little Windows app as a command line driver. To use it, install FFMPEG, place the FFMPEG.EXE somewhere known (e.g. C:\), then the ConvertImageSequence.exe will format a command line based upon the various pull-downs.

mTp

rdolishny
01-04-2016, 11:35 AM
You never export as a video file. If the rendering crashes 99% of the way through, you lose the entire render.

As most have mentioned, always render stills. Mostly I use PNG but have been experimenting with OpenEXR as I learn Fusion.

Surrealist.
01-04-2016, 06:59 PM
Not necessarily always.

There are a lot of good reasons not to, and therefore take the risk. We all know full well the reasons to render to frames. The codecs are there to be used in the times when you don't want to render to frames.

So in essence this is really off topic from the thread.

The thread is not "best professional practice to render final animations". It is how to use the codecs.

They are there to be used in the times you need or want them. And the reasons can vary.

The reasons they are not working are usually related to what codecs you don't yet have installed on your computer. The easiest way to get them is to install players that use them. There are other ways as well. But that us usually the reason they are not working.

m.d.
01-04-2016, 11:33 PM
i would render to an image sequence and convert to avi in post

h.264 is the most universal....but only previz quality

cineform is by far the best as an AVI....comes free with the adobe suite as a QT codec(i paid $2000 for the codec 8 years ago)
for free windows codecs....install the avid codec pack
http://avid.force.com/pkb/articles/en_US/Download/en423319

dnxhd is decent in it's higher bitrate forms but is usually in an .mov or .mxf wrapper

with these codecs you can get higher then 10 bit color fidelity, and intra frame compression as opposed to the h.264 ect with only 8 bit color (same for TGA and video 1, and uncompressed)

if you just need to pass your work around as a finished product for lower end clients.....h.264 is fine....but if you want to preserve highlight details for further refinement....go out to a higher end codec

John Jordan
01-05-2016, 03:37 PM
Not necessarily always.

There are a lot of good reasons not to, and therefore take the risk. We all know full well the reasons to render to frames. The codecs are there to be used in the times when you don't want to render to frames.

So in essence this is really off topic from the thread.

The thread is not "best professional practice to render final animations". It is how to use the codecs.

They are there to be used in the times you need or want them. And the reasons can vary.

The reasons they are not working are usually related to what codecs you don't yet have installed on your computer. The easiest way to get them is to install players that use them. There are other ways as well. But that us usually the reason they are not working.


Exactly!

ohmygeeks
04-14-2016, 08:50 PM
You can try to trancode avi to mkv or mp4 (H.264/AAC) which is the most compatible format/codec, I suppose. The following freeware will be helpful...

FreeMake Video Converter
Handbrake
Mpeg Stream Clip
MyFFmpeg
VirtualDub