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SilencedOutcast
12-12-2015, 11:10 PM
Hello I am new to 3d animation and would like to let you all know a little about me, and in the end ask for some help.

My name is Jason and I am a 16 year old student. I am an avid gamer and reader and always wished to create something to let people know what I see when I imagine about things. I learned about Lightwave3d through a new class at school and I thought being a technical geek I could actually do something. BOY WAS I WRONG. I am not artistic, BUT that is not stopping me. I have always loved playing games and been in search of ways to create my own. Here I have come across lightwave3d with a blessing and generous donation I acquired the educational version. To my excitement I started messing around with the program and man isn't it so overwhelming never seeing a program like this till the past few months I have bean messing with it. Please note I have little artistic ability so was hoping lightwave3d could bridge my gap of artistic disability but my intellectual ability.

So here is what I wish to ask. I want to start in making Avatars. May they be creatures of the night or simple human beings (not so simple as i cant seam to create anything in drawing or in lightwave3d other then shapes.) How can I go about in learning the required techniques in order to start creating avatars? Also what advice would you give to an avid seeker of knowledge who has art disability, Should I be able to draw before I can use lightwave3d? Or can I use Lightwav3d without knowing how to draw?

I been going through the beginner tutorials but I am still rapidly watching the interface one and trying to memorize the interface and messing with breaking objects, but in truth I want to find out how to create avatars and creatures. There any one who could so kindly assist me?

Thanks for your time and sorry about the lengthy post.

DrStrik9
12-12-2015, 11:47 PM
Jason,

Welcome to the LW forum.

I think it's awesome that you are finding LW to be as amazing as it is. I'm glad that you got an educational version of LW. In the 3D world, there are many facets of the craft. There are writers, directors, modelers, riggers, animators, texture artists, lighting experts, rendering/compositing experts, programmers, etc., etc. Not all of these areas of work within 3D need to be "artistic" (although the final product is definitely ART). Many people working in 3D cannot draw well, but they do fulfill their area of specialization extremely well. With this in mind, you should try everything (including modeling, creating objects, creatures, etc.), and in the process, work toward finding your own area of specialty or generalization, within the 3D world. Since you have a love of gaming, you may find a specific place within those areas of work in which you can shine.

There is a large number of very smart people in this forum, who can help you, answer questions, etc. There are also a large number of tutorials of all shapes and sizes, on YouTube, and on various websites. (Google is your friend.) I would guess a majority of LW users do NOT know everything there is to know about LW. But together, we help one another, challenge one another, encourage one another, and generally illuminate the world concerning Lightwave 3D (and beyond).

Good luck as you go forward!

SilencedOutcast
12-12-2015, 11:56 PM
Thank you, I do hope I can learn how to do a multitude of things and I just was asking about avatar creation because I used to write from midnight till 3 in the morning for years and I always wanted to show people my character rather then just words on a page. With learning LW I maybe able to actually sculpt my characters and hopefully one day animate some stories I had written.

vector
12-13-2015, 12:30 AM
Hi.

If you never drew or modeled before it can be a bit hard at the beginning. Fortunatelly you are young. A lot of time to achieve goals. But do not relax ;) ! You should also consider collaborating with other people and go faster. Anyway, be patient and ask in the forums when you need help

Good luck

spherical
12-13-2015, 12:43 AM
I am not artistic, BUT that is not stopping me. <snip> Please note I have little artistic ability so was hoping lightwave3d could bridge my gap of artistic disability but my intellectual ability.

Here's a bit of information from my personal history that may be of value. Many people whom I have taught didn't think that they had any "artistic ability". In my experience, nearly everyone has some of every ability; to greater or lesser degrees. All one has to do is to apply one's attention to that which they want to increase and improve and the "ability" appears. Mind you, there is no shortcut to this. It is a long and dedicated process that one must be committed to. There will be times when you wonder if you chose the right path. Attempts to rely upon software to cover one's deficiencies will always be revealed in the end. There is no cheat. Develop your eye (IOW, recognize that which is good and that which needs more work), produce on multiple levels and you will be recognized and do great work. There are WAY too many hacks in this world already. Don't be another.

SilencedOutcast
12-13-2015, 12:46 AM
Hi.

If you never drew or modeled before it can be a bit hard at the beginning. Fortunatelly you are young. A lot of time to achieve goals. But do not relax ;) ! You should also consider collaborating with other people and go faster. Anyway, be patient and ask in the forums when you need help

Good luck

Yes I am young and already feel over whelmed with the extra classes I am taking, the collage credit classes I am taking, and without knowing how to do much I feel so far behind. I do know I must stretch my patience though as from my brothers mentor and my mentor for a year stated " nothing that comes easy in life is worth while" so this being so complex maybe something that will be very much useful to me.:D

SilencedOutcast
12-13-2015, 12:51 AM
Yes I agree as an active competitive gamer there are many hacks not to mention all the cheats of real live and corrupt people working in different jobs. As an avid knowledge seeker mind you I love to learn, but tis true I lack patience. I have started to try and learn many things but gave up too quickly and I do not want this to happen again. I see great potential in this program and wish to do something great with it in correspondence to my life.

spherical
12-13-2015, 01:06 AM
I must stretch my patience though as from my brothers mentor and my mentor for a year stated " nothing that comes easy in life is worth while" so this being so complex maybe something that will be very much useful to me.:D

They are exactly correct. Your conclusion from their observations and advice is correct, also. Don't waver from that.

SilencedOutcast
12-13-2015, 01:13 AM
thanks again for all this advice, does any one know where I could find a tutorial on making a human or creature? creature be something of the dark like a werewolf, vampire, or some other mythical creature

Farhad_azer
12-13-2015, 01:37 AM
Hi and welcome to the wonderful world of Lightwavers,

I have Inside Lightwave 6 and Inside Lightwave 8 books written by Dan Ablan, a little old in version but they have amazing tutorials on building characters that I would definitely recommend. especially the later which covers quadruped and cartoony character.

Hope to see your results soon.

JohnMarchant
12-13-2015, 01:49 AM
I would check out YT there are hundreds of great free tutorials out there and a wealth of help here, at LWG3D, Lightwiki and a few others. They all mostly have FB/Twitter pages as well.

This is a slow process and even older veterans learn something new everyday about LW as well as new ways of doing things that we didnt think of. Some people are more into the VFX side than modeling and some prefer modeling.

Try to decide what is your main interest and start there, once you have a handle on that then look to doing other things. One thing is for sure it will take you years. For me i learnt various modeling techniques as there are quite a few. Then i moved onto texturing and UV mapping (PITA). Then i moved on to rigging and animation. Lastly i started with VFX, HV, Bullet, Instances, Hypervoxels and complex animation.

Just remember for most things there are several ways to do it and its not only about the best way its about what you feel comfortable with and what else you have in your tool box. Just remember this is a long process over several years and even then you will never know everything as you, your workflow and LW are constantly evolving.

Good luck and keep us posted.

SilencedOutcast
12-13-2015, 03:00 AM
I would check out YT there are hundreds of great free tutorials out there and a wealth of help here, at LWG3D, Lightwiki and a few others. They all mostly have FB/Twitter pages as well.

This is a slow process and even older veterans learn something new everyday about LW as well as new ways of doing things that we didnt think of. Some people are more into the VFX side than modeling and some prefer modeling.
Just remember this is a long process over several years and even then you will never know everything as you, your workflow and LW are constantly evolving.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Thanks for the feedback ya I know this will be long I just hope I can grasp it and apply it well in my life and fully get the experience. I also built a pc just for this program but I have no clue what all I need because I sold a lot just to muster up a 900$ pc and it still lags bad when trying out the rendering for the glass breaking. I am running this. Price always changing could have bought fully half off at one point with having no job and no income drove me insane for all the things i sold to make it.... But here it is https://pcpartpicker.com/user/Silencer/saved/

pinkmouse
12-13-2015, 03:18 AM
Bullet is always slow. Start with smaller sims, and just render a few critical frames and fine tune the simulation.Then you can add more objects and increase the simulation time.

JohnMarchant
12-13-2015, 03:20 AM
Hardware is of course another issue and it does cost. You will never have enough Memory, Fast enough Processor and enough Graphics cards to fully use it. However don't forget LW does not take advantage of all of this hardware anyway.

For modeling your setup seems ok but of course for really processor intensive work (VFX, Bullet, HV, and Particles) will require more. Most people have at least 2 computers or more. Rendering can take a long time so we tend to work on one and render on another. There are some good internet discussions about buying old second hand computers and combining them as a render farm. Even lowly processors if enough of them can give you a good render farm setup.

Look around at offices, government buildings and such. They often have auctions to get rid of old computers and hardware for cheap and usually they are not that old, some just throw them away. Its the computer boxes you need not screens and such. No real need for DVD/CD/Blueray. Just one screen to interact with all the computers. There is actually a wealth of stuff out there and the internet has all the info you need.

We all have the same problem, as im mobile now allot of the time i have a fairly powerful laptop (3 years old), its has 2 graphics cards and 32 gb memory. Its a little powerhouse but costs. I would really look at second hand stuff and see how you can enhance your setup.

JohnMarchant
12-13-2015, 03:34 AM
A common misconception especially for those new to the industry is that your equipment is somehow inferior to everyone elses and that we dont have the same problems you have. I can assure you that is not the case.

We are all trying to wrangle more speed out of our modeling, sims, VFX and such. We all get lags sometimes and its a matter of knowing where the lag exists in the pipeline and software that will help you out. Its also helps out to know this as it will point you in the right direction when making hardware choices.

An example would be Octane Renderer. This is a great renderer and Juan has done a fantastic job bringing it to LW. However it is a GPU renderer and so uses our graphics card. This is great if you have loads of Titan cards working together and it fairly zips along. However if your graphics cards are more modest like mine or you only have one then the speed increase is not allot, that's not saying its not worth the investment its just you have to look at the cost versus benefit.

Also some things Octane does not render in LW at the moment, these things are being addressed in v 3, so yet again make sure you have all these facts before you make any decisions on hardware and software updates. This forum is great for help in that area. There are many knowledgeable people here and no question is a stupid one.

erikals
12-13-2015, 03:38 AM
Welcome! http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/king.gif

for tutorials, check the first link in my signature...




can I use Lightwave3d without knowing how to draw?
you can make tons of cool LightWave stuff without knowing how to draw... http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif

https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/design/salvatore_coco-light_and_shadow.jpg
https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/design/evgeny_terentev-coffee_butterflies.jpg
https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/visualisation/emanuel_henne-nonstop.jpg
https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/architecture/janusz_biela-plain_space.jpg
https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/character/luis_lopes-wood_doll.jpg
https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/visualisation/evgeny_terentev-lw_ring.jpg

SilencedOutcast
12-13-2015, 04:22 AM
Bullet is always slow. Start with smaller sims, and just render a few critical frames and fine tune the simulation.Then you can add more objects and increase the simulation time.

kk thanks for advise :)

- - - Updated - - -



Welcome! http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/king.gif

for tutorials, check the first link in my signature...




you can make tons of cool LightWave stuff without knowing how to draw... http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif

https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/design/salvatore_coco-light_and_shadow.jpg
https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/design/evgeny_terentev-coffee_butterflies.jpg
https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/visualisation/emanuel_henne-nonstop.jpg
https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/architecture/janusz_biela-plain_space.jpg
https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/character/luis_lopes-wood_doll.jpg
https://www.lightwave3d.com/static/media/uploads/gallery_images/visualisation/evgeny_terentev-lw_ring.jpg

They are all pictures I dont see any tutorial? Although the pictures are neat would love to try and make something :)

SilencedOutcast
12-13-2015, 04:25 AM
Also some things Octane does not render in LW at the moment, these things are being addressed in v 3, so yet again make sure you have all these facts before you make any decisions on hardware and software updates. This forum is great for help in that area. There are many knowledgeable people here and no question is a stupid one.

Yes the pc is ever evolving along with the programs I just dont know if my pc is good enough to do what I hope I can do but by that time will be few to many years so by then should have an income to actually build a strong pc. And with this processing farms? does this help? I will do a quick search on google about what it is and what it does. Thanks for the advice :D

erikals
12-13-2015, 04:53 AM
referring to the "LW Vidz" link in the signature, this one >

http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?125893-LightWave-Training-just-a-list&p=1220226#post1220226

http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/047.gif

MonroePoteet
12-13-2015, 06:08 AM
I'd agree with the recommendation to search YouTube for anatomy, drawing and art videos. To make avatars which look at all realistic (or stylized, or caricatures, or anything), you'll need to understand the proportions of real bodies. For example, here's a great (humorous) video on Human Anatomy for Artists:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDgyQjNFVQk

I think you'll find (as I have) that it's easy enough to clunk together some cylinders / balls to form torso, arms, legs, head, etc., but it never looks quite right for some reason. Proportions, angles, ratios, contours, etc. all make or break a figure.

Personally, I'd recommend learning to draw figures before trying to create them in Modeler, at *least* a simple line drawing of the contours of your goal. I'm definitely no expert on character design / animation, though.

mTp

erikals
12-13-2015, 06:44 AM
Great Link! Thanks! http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif

MonroePoteet
12-13-2015, 07:59 AM
Yes the pc is ever evolving along with the programs I just dont know if my pc is good enough to do what I hope I can do but by that time will be few to many years so by then should have an income to actually build a strong pc. And with this processing farms? does this help? I will do a quick search on google about what it is and what it does. Thanks for the advice :D

I've used LW off and on for about 20 years now, and did a lot of rendering on a 90 MEGAhertz (not GIGAhertz) system which only had 64 MEGAbytes (not GIGAbytes) of memory, which BTW cost $7000 in 1994. The strategy was (and still is for complex stuff) to set up a render for while I was sleeping each night and working or going to classes the next day. To set it up, I'd do test renders (F9) and go do something else, with a kitchen timer set to ding about the time I expected it to be done, then finalize the scene, cross my fingers and press F10 just before going to sleep and hope I hadn't missed anything. Slow progress, but progress nonetheless.

The calculations used in 3D animation are very complex. Game engines take advantage of massively parallel processors (Graphics Processor Units, or GPUs) which have many hundreds of "cores" which allow simultaenous calculations, *IF* the game / program running them is built to do so. The LW renderer isn't built to use GPUs, although LW engineering is apparently working on implementing it. Modeler and VPR use OpenGL, which is accelerated by GPUs, so the performance there is pretty good. GPUs tend to have a simplistic instruction set, which limit their applicability to general purpose programming and makes adapting a program like LW to the limited instruction set quite difficult.

The upshot of this long-winded monologue is that to get performance for complex LW scenes, you'll need a really fast CPU, lots of memory, and a good OpenGL video card for Modeler and VPR. Not cheap. However, with almost any budget these days, you can get an acceptable system if you're patient and have a realistic strategy for planning renders while you're doing other things.

mTp

P.S. BTW, the "processing farms" you mention are called "render farms". There have been some recommendations and discussions of them on these forums. They require packaging your scene, uploading it to the farm, paying for the processing and storage required, and downloading the renders. I'd recommend using the "patience is a virtue" approach before paying for time on a render farm.

jeric_synergy
12-13-2015, 11:43 AM
One thing: if Modeling isn't your bag, there are PLENTY of free/included models online or come with the program. You may find you prefer animating to modeling*, so do NOT allow that to become a roadblock to your progress, there are plenty of ways 'around' that, including teaming with people who LOVE modeling.

(For me, audio/sound/music is always the stumbling block. Rather than trying to do something I don't enjoy, I use 'clip art'.)

The ONE attribute that will get you through is persistence. And flexibility. Wait, that's two, except for very flexible values of 'one'.


*there are plenty of modeled t-rexes in the world.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

re: rendering: your machine can work ALL NIGHT LONG. Prepare multiple scenes for rendering before going to bed, and make that machine weep with all the work it's doing all night long. Become familiar with ScreamerNet and RenderQ. Also, enlist your entire family/workpod's computers.

Conversely, AVOID rendering while you are awake/available to do creative work. This can mean rendering very small images when you absolutely need to see the render. Render during meal breaks, or sanity breaks. YOUR time is valuable, your computer's time is NOT.

Render at the smallest/lowest rez/quality you can get away with at any time. Save the bells and whistles for the final render. Become familiar with the power of compositors (AE, Fusion) to avoid re-rendering.

SilencedOutcast
12-13-2015, 08:16 PM
One thing: if Modeling isn't your bag, there are PLENTY of free/included models online or come with the program.

The ONE attribute that will get you through is persistence. And flexibility. Wait, that's two, except for very flexible values of 'one'.

Become familiar with ScreamerNet and RenderQ. Also, enlist your entire family/workpod's computers.

Render at the smallest/lowest rez/quality you can get away with at any time. (AE, Fusion) to avoid re-rendering.

Thanks for advice and Ya we a low budget family so I had to sell a lot and money from a law suit was the reason I got a PC other then that there is only 1 more that we can barely function as multitude of Virus and adware

jeric_synergy
12-13-2015, 08:18 PM
Any professional need to understand his/her tools: educate yourself on how to expunge that adware and virus blight. Then you'll have two computers to render on.

SilencedOutcast
12-13-2015, 08:22 PM
I've used LW off and on for about 20 years now, and did a lot of rendering on a 90 MEGAhertz (not GIGAhertz) system which only had 64 MEGAbytes (not GIGAbytes) of memory, which BTW cost $7000 in 1994. The strategy was (and still is for complex stuff) to set up a render for while I was sleeping each night and working or going to classes the next day. To set it up, I'd do test renders (F9) and go do something else, with a kitchen timer set to ding about the time I expected it to be done, then finalize the scene, cross my fingers and press F10 just before going to sleep and hope I hadn't missed anything. Slow progress, but progress nonetheless.

The upshot of this long-winded monologue is that to get performance for complex LW scenes, you'll need a really fast CPU, lots of memory, and a good OpenGL video card for Modeler and VPR. Not cheap. However, with almost any budget these days, you can get an acceptable system if you're patient and have a realistic strategy for planning renders while you're doing other things.
$ I spent on this one. Already the price dropped by
P.S. BTW, the "processing farms" you mention are called "render farms". There have been some recommendations and discussions of them on these forums. They require packaging your scene, uploading it to the farm, paying for the processing and storage required, and downloading the renders. I'd recommend using the "patience is a virtue" approach before paying for time on a render farm.

Thank you for the tips and well seeing that price tag and the specs associated with that price hurts to see as there is no source of income for me and a sold much for this PC for I am now afraid to look in the next 20 years at what kind of PC I can make with the 900$ I spent on this PC. Already the price dropped a good 300-400$

- - - Updated - - -



referring to the "LW Vidz" link in the signature, this one >

http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?125893-LightWave-Training-just-a-list&p=1220226#post1220226

http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/047.gif

Thank you My bad XD I will take a look at these and will definitely learn something even if I must watch them over and over.

SilencedOutcast
12-13-2015, 08:25 PM
I'd agree with the recommendation to search YouTube for anatomy, drawing and art videos. To make avatars which look at all realistic (or stylized, or caricatures, or anything), you'll need to understand the proportions of real bodies. For example, here's a great (humorous) video on Human Anatomy for Artists:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDgyQjNFVQk

I think you'll find (as I have) that it's easy enough to clunk together some cylinders / balls to form torso, arms, legs, head, etc., but it never looks quite right for some reason. Proportions, angles, ratios, contours, etc. all make or break a figure.

Personally, I'd recommend learning to draw figures before trying to create them in Modeler, at *least* a simple line drawing of the contours of your goal. I'm definitely no expert on character design / animation, though.

mTp

Thanks for the advice I can do basic drawing of shapes like ovals and circles just always come out oddly, rarely every really decent, and I do plan to learn how to do details. Ill be honest I have not thought about doing the shapes in LW like the basic shapes in the drawing I must try that out. I will also look into the video thank you. :)

djwaterman
12-13-2015, 11:36 PM
If money is really tight, perhaps you should consider Blender, I'm pretty sure people are making game characters with it. Along with your educational version of LW, blender, various really good open source paint programs out there as well, Krita, MyPaint, Gimp, you don't really have to spend another dime while you educate yourself with these. MakeHuman is free and can generate good base meshes, I just downloaded DAZ the other day, that's free as well, comes with some base meshes of humans. Then there is Sculptris from Pixologic, and remember Blender has sculpt abilities also. Many free tools now days. It shouldn't cost you anything to give them a go and see if you even have an affinity to this kind of field.

JonW
12-13-2015, 11:58 PM
Us oldies are always learning!

It is easy to get VERY VERY VERY lazy with the amount of RAM & CPUs that's available today for X dollars. It is good to learn to build your 2d & 3d files efficiently, including greyscale for channels. The best way is when you have limited computer power. It simply forces you to be efficient.

Get hold of a second computer, someone probably will give you an old one (or more if you can get a few!). From TODAY start building your scenes to run on Screamernet (see SN threads). Firstly it teaches you to be a very good administrator for organising all your files. This is absolutely critical in the long run, & there is nothing worse than deadlines & all your files are in a mess. Very good naming protocol at every level from file names to layers to textures makes life so much easier in the long run.

Secondly, rendering frames, the more computers you can throw at the job the better. Just 1 extra computer to setup & learn network rendering will be a huge first step.

My youngest computers are from 2009 and there is nothing wrong with them.

JonW
12-14-2015, 12:40 AM
You do not need the latest computer.

Make as many stuff ups as you can!

As Tomas Edison said: I learnt 2000 ways how not to build a light globe!

In 3d it's the mistakes while learning that are the skills you learn to build things a different way or a dozen different ways for another project.

jeric_synergy
12-14-2015, 12:58 AM
In many ways, SIMULATION is a deep rathole of wasted time. Olde school techniques are still valid, and can be far quicker.

DrStrik9
12-14-2015, 09:59 AM
As Tomas Edison said: I learnt 2000 ways how not to build a light globe!

Excellent Edison reference, but I think he said 10,000 ways. You only fail when you give up, even 10,000 times.

"I have not failed. I've just found 10000 ways that won't work."

:+)

Dexter2999
12-14-2015, 11:25 AM
Welcome to 3d.

If you want to create avatars, you will need to learn about anatomy as you have been told in an earlier post. Reason being you need to know/understand what you are trying to make before you can make it match that picture in your head.

Then you will get to modeling. You can choose either spline modeling or box modeling methods. Here are couple of youtube vids demonstrating the different processes.
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VOcyliN80sI
http://m.youtube.com/?#/watch?list=PLuCJ8vNd1f30tjtTezy-7-nYIeTrJNgZI&v=kXyOenAtnIA

After you get the rough shapes you want from these methods, you will want to get details in clothing and accessories (like weapons) and to do this you will need to learn subpatch modeling techniques.

Then there is texturing.

Then to make them move you will learn rigging and and animation techniques.

There is alot, and I mean ALOT to learn. So it is good that you are starting early. I hope you find this all interesting and fun for a hobby and maybe later on in life something you want to turn into a career.

Warning! In at least one of the videos Ilinked to, the tutor is using a custom keyboard assigned command. If you try to replicate the video take note of what tab and menu the commands are on, because control-x on your computer won't be the same as in the video by default.

Good luck.

SilencedOutcast
12-20-2015, 11:20 AM
If money is really tight, perhaps you should consider Blender, I'm pretty sure people are making game characters with it. Along with your educational version of LW, blender, various really good open source paint programs out there as well, Krita, MyPaint, Gimp, you don't really have to spend another dime while you educate yourself with these. MakeHuman is free and can generate good base meshes, I just downloaded DAZ the other day, that's free as well, comes with some base meshes of humans. Then there is Sculptris from Pixologic, and remember Blender has sculpt abilities also. Many free tools now days. It shouldn't cost you anything to give them a go and see if you even have an affinity to this kind of field.

Yes i have Blender, Gimp, Daz, LW, ChronoSculpt, and Maya the educational versions but full versions all the same. And i need to educate my self on all of them they all vastly different but core concept simular.

SilencedOutcast
12-20-2015, 11:26 AM
Us oldies are always learning!

It is easy to get VERY VERY VERY lazy with the amount of RAM & CPUs that's available today for X dollars. It is good to learn to build your 2d & 3d files efficiently, including greyscale for channels. The best way is when you have limited computer power. It simply forces you to be efficient.

Get hold of a second computer, someone probably will give you an old one (or more if you can get a few!). From TODAY start building your scenes to run on Screamernet (see SN threads).

My youngest computers are from 2009 and there is nothing wrong with them.

Yes organization I will need to learn. I am avid gamer so with skyrim and many other games I had over 300 mods running and didn't know witch to place where so only about 240 worked properly so file organization is critical in sense get things done quickly and working properly. As for older computers I built mine in the sense of gaming and animation so its decent and not the best, but the PC I used to run as a windows xp from 1997 with only 258mb ram and i believe a CPU hitting only 800 mghz. Also Will look into the SN threads (if i can even figure out where that is) as even though money is major issue I will be looking into making another pc because i want to try both intel and amd and also radeon vs nvidia with there cuda core technology; This though does have to wait till am able to get a job but with all the collage classes Im taking in highschool not giving me time for anything.

SilencedOutcast
12-20-2015, 11:39 AM
Welcome to 3d.

If you want to create avatars, you will need to learn about anatomy as you have been told in an earlier post. Reason being you need to know/understand what you are trying to make before you can make it match that picture in your head.

Then you will get to modeling. You can choose either spline modeling or box modeling methods. Here are couple of youtube vids demonstrating the different processes.
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VOcyliN80sI
http://m.youtube.com/?#/watch?list=PLuCJ8vNd1f30tjtTezy-7-nYIeTrJNgZI&v=kXyOenAtnIA

After you get the rough shapes you want from these methods, you will want to get details in clothing and accessories (like weapons) and to do this you will need to learn subpatch modeling techniques.

Then there is texturing.

Then to make them move you will learn rigging and and animation techniques.

There is alot, and I mean ALOT to learn. So it is good that you are starting early. I hope you find this all interesting and fun for a hobby and maybe later on in life something you want to turn into a career.

Warning! In at least one of the videos Ilinked to, the tutor is using a custom keyboard assigned command. If you try to replicate the video take note of what tab and menu the commands are on, because control-x on your computer won't be the same as in the video by default.

Good luck.

Thank you for the tips. I definitely would love to turn this into a hobby and a career. At a you age of 6 Ive always played games, from the Nintendo 64, original xbox, original playstation, and on even with handhelds like the game boy color and such I have always wanted to create my own characters. I started out as writing, and now want to move to animation to fully capture the characters I created. I wish to take my knowledge and learn as much as I can. I am very interested in trying to make my own game, or to the very least just avatars in order to see if someone could interpret into a game and animation. So I will look into these videos and try and keep practicing and hope I get the time to fully emerge myself into this program and similar ones to fully pull all I can out of them.

jeric_synergy
12-20-2015, 12:13 PM
With all those apps, you're going to have a hard time integrating your learning.

Here's one approach, which may not be the best (everybody?):

Make a list of objects of ascending complexity. For every type (3d/2d) of tool, learn how to make the object efficiently.

But really, that's a hell of a hard road. You might do better (who knows) mastering ONE, then moving on. But, what's the definition of 'mastering'? Photorealism? I've never accomplished that yet. It's all on you how you define success. You might go with a very cartoony look.

And: find people with entire project planned, like amateur films, and volunteer your labor. This will force you to address problems you wouldn't approach, which wouldn't OCCUR to you to approach, which is always a valuable learning experience. Being subject to a non-animator's whims will teach you a lot, both about people and software. (Also, they might have old computers to donate.)

SilencedOutcast
12-20-2015, 12:39 PM
With all those apps, you're going to have a hard time integrating your learning.

Make a list of objects of ascending complexity. For every type (3d/2d) of tool, learn how to make the object efficiently.

But really, that's a hell of a hard road. You might do better (who knows) mastering ONE, then moving on. But, what's the definition of 'mastering'? Photorealism? I've never accomplished that yet. It's all on you how you define success. You might go with a very cartoony look.

And: find people with entire project planned, like amateur films, and volunteer your labor. This will force you to address problems you wouldn't approach, which wouldn't OCCUR to you to approach, which is always a valuable learning experience. Being subject to a non-animator's whims will teach you a lot, both about people and software. (Also, they might have old computers to donate.)

Ya i agree I really want to get proficient in both LW and Gimp daz is OK, good for posing integration but not what I am looking much into at time and 3DS max (mixed up with maya dont have maya) just hate there movement tool so i dont use it much if at all mainly use inventor for school projects and ya. I am looking for apprenticeships and such but never anything around where i live soi I gana try get permit soon. My view of success atm is just trying to create 1 character that I can go and say I have completed and will look back on and watch progress as I am able to learn more.

jeric_synergy
12-20-2015, 01:05 PM
I don't know where you are in Oregon, but Portland had a VERY active Animation sceen (Vinton used LW for a time, and HASH was from there IIRC), and I imagine the two college towns have something-- wannabee filmmakers fer sure.

If you're in Eastern Oregon, dood, yer screwed. ;)

Farhad_azer
12-22-2015, 11:06 AM
djwaterman once said sth very important that most beginners don't consider that.

While you are learning this, never forget to do your best to get highest quality out of your practices. even try to do post process and keep it for yourself. why? so that you can present it as your portfolio later, I know it might not very vital for you to think about finding a job at the moment but nobody knows about future, it is very probable that you will get lucky and get a chance of working with a big name.

I read this advice when it was too late, bec I had received a call from a big industry and I had lots of unfinished works in my disposal. my works were satisfying for me bec I knew the techniques but not to them. even if I had read his post earlier in my life I would have not got it seriously bec nature of people is to learn from bad experience than learning it from history.

I lost that chance and don't let it happen to you, do your best even at the early stage of your development our dear new friend.

SilencedOutcast
12-24-2015, 12:47 AM
I don't know where you are in Oregon, but Portland had a VERY active Animation sceen (Vinton used LW for a time, and HASH was from there IIRC), and I imagine the two college towns have something-- wannabee filmmakers fer sure.

If you're in Eastern Oregon, dood, yer screwed. ;)

Ya I'm in Salem Oregon so not up in Portland where there are many different active groups.

- - - Updated - - -


djwaterman once said sth very important that most beginners don't consider that.

While you are learning this, never forget to do your best to get highest quality out of your practices. even try to do post process and keep it for yourself. why? so that you can present it as your portfolio later, I know it might not very vital for you to think about finding a job at the moment but nobody knows about future, it is very probable that you will get lucky and get a chance of working with a big name.

I read this advice when it was too late, bec I had received a call from a big industry and I had lots of unfinished works in my disposal. my works were satisfying for me bec I knew the techniques but not to them. even if I had read his post earlier in my life I would have not got it seriously bec nature of people is to learn from bad experience than learning it from history.

I lost that chance and don't let it happen to you, do your best even at the early stage of your development our dear new friend.

Ya I have bad habit of always throwing away work that I dont deem worthy and that seems to be everything. I am my own worst critic and that is something everyone is noticing about me and I tend to give up and start fresh non stop thus getting no where. I will need to learn to stick with what I'm doing and try make the most of it to get any where. Thanks for the advice.

spherical
12-24-2015, 04:28 AM
I am my own worst critic and that is something everyone is noticing about me

This is actually a Good Thing. One needs to be extra critical of their work. This needs to happen before anyone else gets to see it. Being able to be objective and discard that which is not acceptable is a valuable trait and asset to possess. Yes, if not channeled correctly, it can lead to self-defeating. Use it to your advantage, rather than your detriment. Not everyone can do this. Just try to do it. If you don't believe in yourself, no one else will. You know you can do it or you wouldn't be trying to in the first place. So do it. Keep doing it.


and I tend to give up and start fresh non stop thus getting no where. I will need to learn to stick with what I'm doing and try make the most of it to get any where.

Well, there's that and there is also beating a dead horse. Sometimes, one must let go of creations that just didn't pan out to one's expectations. Happens all the time. Not unusual. Looks goo in one's mind but, when putting pencil to paper it just is lacking somehow. This is not to say that discarding everything that doesn't garner immediate positive praise is the only choice. Many times in my career I have witnessed images that "have their own time". They weren't widely popular or even accepted when they were created, but found their place much later at an often surprising time. They rose to heights that I had not imagined possible; just not at the time that I had planned.

Don't give up.