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View Full Version : Can I put a movie in syfy channel ?



rednova
10-29-2015, 10:50 AM
Dear Friends:

A long time ago, I read that a rapper produced an indie movie called 'Anaconda' with 100 grand.
If I make my own movie (with lightwave 3d) would it be possible that syfy channel airs it ?
Provided is a good quality movie, and syfy ?
Please answer !!!

pinkmouse
10-29-2015, 10:55 AM
The only people who know that are the commissioning editors at SyFy. ;)

rednova
10-29-2015, 10:59 AM
@pinkmouse

ooooh thank you anyways !!!

ernpchan
10-29-2015, 12:50 PM
I suppose it is possible but it won't be easy. I think this project was a small indie project that's now getting a more commercialized release.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3472226/

Davewriter
10-29-2015, 08:09 PM
It might be easier to do if you had a name(s) attached to it already.
A good number of SciFi's films have at least one of those "hey, remember him / her?"
I would image that most of the budget goes to them and camera rental.
But it sure helps your odds when pitching your idea.

Greenlaw
10-29-2015, 11:40 PM
Coincidentally, I watched Kung Fury on NetFlix last night. It's 30 minutes of brain-exploding, 1980's-style b-movie action awesomeness!

Probably not for everybody but, IMO, it's far more entertaining that most movies made in Hollywood. From the credits, Kung Fury was apparently a kickstarter movie...and I think it was made in Sweden.

Check it out. Barbarianna commands it!

G.

P.S., between 2013 and 2014, I worked on about a dozen 'SyFy' productions. Budgets were typically between $100k to $250k. It was a lot of fun but, man, the schedules could get brutal. I just noticed from the IMDB page Ernest cited that Kung Fury cost $600k. That's really not a 'b-movie' budget, at least by SyFy standards, considering the film is only 30-minutes long.

P.P.S., I also worked on a bunch of b-movies from 1998 to 2001. Back then, the typical budgets were between $1 million to $1.5 million. Schedules were actually more reasonable back then but of course, considering how long it took to render anything, we really needed the time! Back then all of our vfx work still had to be recorded to 35mm film so I think the biggest drop in cost came with acceptance of digital video for feature film productions.

erikals
10-30-2015, 02:24 AM
Back then all of our vfx work still had to be recorded to 35mm film so I think the biggest drop in cost came with acceptance of digital video for feature film productions.
i seem to remember just to convert the film cost $35.000
i'm pretty sure converting to Dolby Digital did cost alot also...

marketing also is a huge chunk of the budget... (often over half of the budget)

Greenlaw
10-30-2015, 10:02 AM
We had our own film recorder at the studio but, yeah, then there was sending it out for processing, color timing, making prints, transferring the film to analog video, etc. That was about 15 years ago for me but until recently the rest of the industry still did it that way.