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lightscape
10-24-2015, 09:36 PM
I think its worth picking up if you use 3dcoat for 3d painting.
Artist is from Blizzard. His youtube vids have tens of thousands of views and some pretty cool 2d painting sessions in there.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jPrzOBDhlWc

I am not affiliated with the artist.

Wickedpup
10-25-2015, 07:29 AM
This guy also has a couple of 3D-coat tutorials.......

https://gumroad.com/metalman123456123

lightscape
10-25-2015, 09:22 PM
Nice find and cheap.

erikals
10-26-2015, 02:39 AM
http://forums.newtek.com/images/misc/quote_icon.pngWickedpup
This guy also has a couple of 3D-coat tutorials.......
https://gumroad.com/metalman123456123
nice price, did you buy it? if so, was it any good?

erikals
10-26-2015, 02:52 AM
i'll assume you all know the official channel
https://www.youtube.com/user/PILGWAY3DCoat/videos

Wickedpup
10-26-2015, 04:06 AM
nice price, did you buy it? if so, was it any good?

I bought the Intro course, I'm only halfway through the second of 6 parts so it's a bit early to pass any final judgement, but I have enjoyed it so far and learned a lot.

Waves of light
10-26-2015, 06:09 PM
Good find and as a 3DC user, I will go and check this person out in more detail.

ActionBob
10-27-2015, 10:22 AM
My rant below is for this link..

https://gumroad.com/metalman123456123


The author's name is David something.... I am not at home right now to look..


I took the bait and started watching the inroduction series last night.

Here is my take on it...

I broke down in a fit of laughter after getting through 3/4's of first section video (beware of the multi-gigabyte files as it seems the author didn't compress them - or edit, but I will get to that).

The reason for my laughter is not because I found the author funny or charming in any sort of way, but frankly, the presentation style and lack of professionalism in delivering their product was ironically and hilariously psyche wrecking.

To be honest, I have not got into the tutorial proper, but had only watched 3/4's of it before I couldn't take it any more and broke down in a fit of laughter at the ridiculousness of it all.

I will sum up my initial impressions below.

Presentation:

Switch on the camera and start going - no preparation or editing. This follows the norm of the YouTube generation where everybody thinks they can just do something and it is great. "Hemming and Hawing" through your presentation makes the viewer doubt your skills and the utility of what they bought. A little editing goes a LONG way to get your point across. I understand that these programs can be finicky at times and nothing goes perfect - that is why you edit - to give the viewer the best and apt information. Forgive me for having the attitude that paid for instruction should be as professionally presented as possible (I paid more for these than the asking price because I believe if supporting artists who demonstrate good skill and knowledge).

Profanity:

It has no place in a "professional" presentation. I could forgive an unedited slip of the tongue when an unexpected crash happens, but when the author denotes an unexpected result from an operation on some geometry as a "$h!t-storm of rage" from the program, I lost it in a fit of laughter, weeping for this younger generation of "professionals."

No rehersal:

When the author states that a tool "literally" does what is states; that is useless information. The use of the word literally is used, "literally," at least a dozen times. I guess they don't teach public speaking at a fine arts school. Again some preparation and editing would go a long way. I also found that the author was easily distracted and went on many small tangents when talking about certain tools and the cadence of speach would "literally" fluctuate between profanity laden, stoner-speak quips to tripple speed, randomized interface clicking with accompaning fast-speak-stream-of-thought activity. I could not help but have visions of this young man trying to balance out BONG hits with binging on Red Bull.

I don't mean to come down so hard on the author. I assume and hope that he is, indeed, a great artist to learn from. I bought the two vids pertaining to 3d coat and hope to learn something. Therein lies my frustration. Even with the unrehersed and profanity laden presentation, I actually learned a couple of things from the intro. I have a sense that this young man actually knows something, but may not be the best at conveying that information due to nerves or ADHD. Since I bought the tuts, I will wade through and probably learn something. As a past instructor of animation and photoshop, I will be wincing along the way...

Again, I paid more for these than the asking price. I want to encourage people to make good tutorials; to share knowledge. But given last night's experience, I may have to relegate this young man to the avoidance status I have given another prolific author, who I found less than professional and whose mastery of such tools I found lacking. Perhaps this young man really knows his stuff. Like good medicine, I may have to consume a bitter pill to glean the benefits.

-Adrian

erikals
10-28-2015, 04:01 AM
heh, fun read... http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif

i'll have to take a second look for sure!

thank you for input. http://forums.cgsociety.org/images/smilies/arteest.gif

Wickedpup
10-28-2015, 05:15 AM
I have no issues with his teaching style or language in the parts I have seen up until now.. As far as his skill level goes I found the tutorials in his thread at ZBrushcentral....
http://www.zbrushcentral.com/showthread.php?67348-Some-Zbrush-and-Max-Work/page35

ActionBob
10-28-2015, 08:13 AM
Again, this is referring to the tutorials by David Lesperance (I think that is the right spelling).

https://gumroad.com/metalman123456123


I watched more of the video series last night (intro to 3D Coat where he builds some rocks, repeating assets and an arch).

I have this to say:

He has skill.

Yes, I have learned a couple of things I didn't already know.

But as far as teaching goes, there is no real style there in my opinion. Haphazardly stumbling your way through an interface, constantly thinking out loud and wondering where something is and hovering the mouse over the very button you are looking for is not a teaching style. It simply reeks of no preparation, no rehearsal and definitely no filter when it comes to language. When a person is constantly referring to a WIP as "sh#t" or that something looks "***," it can be distracting. Having your audience see your working folders on your computer labeled "[email protected] and [email protected]" is distracting.

Some would say that I am just old and out of touch with how people communicate. I would say that I can communicate quite well without resorting to dropping profanity all the time. Don't get me wrong, I am a big gaming geek and hang out at a game store with other gaming nerds who play Magic the Gathering and a whole host of other games. They can cuss like sailors, but that is a different time and place. As a customer, hungry for efficient, well produced content, I don't see my expectations as unreasonable; especially when someone is asking for money for things that can be learned for free from YouTube.

Did I glean some useful information? Yes! Was I distracted by all the fluff, stumbling and rambling on some tangent that often went nowhere? Yes! This first series is in the neighborhood of 5 -6 hours long; it could easily be rehearsed or edited down to half as much.

When I taught, I was prepared and knew that my class expected to see results quickly and learn efficiently (they were paying $120 / hour). Some may state that the price of these tutorials doesn't warrant a professional atmosphere. Well, I would disagree and state that if you are charging anything to teach a "professional" application (and not all apps should be valued according to their price tag - some amazing stuff is, comparatively, dirt cheap!).



Bottom line:

There is SOME utility in these videos.

The author could rehearse and class it up a bit - not that hard, but it does take effort.

I bought two of his series and I will watch them.

I, however, will most likely pass on anything else from this guy - even free stuff. I am frustrated by this as he seems to be an excellent environmental artist.

I will seek out and pay for content presented in a more mature and professional manner. I love to learn and have put up many hundreds of dollars (I can't even take a good guess - been at this stuff since Lightwave 3.5 and before that Imagine). I would have no problem putting up many hundreds more for good content... I just really hate wasting my time any more than I already do..... :-)

-Adrian

ActionBob
10-28-2015, 08:27 AM
Finally, I would like to thank both LightScape and WickedPup for the finds and sharing!

Finding good tutorial content is hard these days. My rants above are not, in any way, meant to be attacks on either of you for sharing your finds.

Thanks again.

-Adrian

lightscape
10-29-2015, 09:12 AM
gumroad quality is pretty iffy since everyone can sell their own stuff.
Its hard to find quality tutorials for 3dcoat.