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Farhad_azer
09-15-2015, 12:30 AM
Helppppppppp meeeeee

I just received a phone call from a big company here in Baku and going to do job interview.

with such stupid works that I have done I know I have no chance by impressing them.

What can I do in less than 3 hours and 58 minutes to impress them on how great Lightwave 3d is?

I say it again that everything I have done so far by your helps are just technical stuffs for educating myself (great guys like Dan ablan, Ryan Roy, Greenlaw and others have helped me tremendously) and are not aesthetically impressive.

I am a devoted Lightwaver and am trying to promote our beloved package here where virtually nobody has heard of it.

I don't know some prepared material or sth, I really am embarrassed for such stupid question.

O my god there is only 3 hours and 56 minutes left.

- - - Updated - - -

I forgot to say Hello bec I was in such a rush, sorry fellas HELOOOOOO <3

Lewis
09-15-2015, 12:33 AM
Unless they are search for LightWave perosn specifically it's not LW that you need to convince them it's great but your work, regardelss of app you use.

jeric_synergy
09-15-2015, 12:54 AM
I'm ashamed to admit I've never heard of Baku, it looks fabulous.

Farhad_azer
09-15-2015, 01:22 AM
Lewis I will go thorugh details, plz not now.
Jeric, you can be my guest, I would love to see you all.

Plz guys time is passing, do sth pleaseeeeeeeeeeee

spherical
09-15-2015, 01:26 AM
Late to the thread, but I would say that at this point your best approach is to just bring a small set of examples of your work (only the best--less is more), and be yourself. Be genuine, candid and open. Scary, I know, but it will put them at ease and may indeed throw them off their guard; allowing you to further engage in conversation. Let them get to know you. The work that you show is the product. It is static. But you are the dynamic vehicle that produced it. It is your capability, even unseen at this point, that a good evaluator is ultimately interested in. Be that vehicle. It's the best that you can do and that is all that any of us can do. Go for it. You'll do fine.

djwaterman
09-15-2015, 01:37 AM
I wonder how he went. But in any case this is why it is so important for any newbies learning this skill, that at some point early start building a portfolio and not just do fan type work. This means thinking about what would look good to a client, in advertising or film. Think that you only need a few really good pieces and what they should be and work at doing those. And render out really clean renders with all the sampling turned up so that there is no noise. Look at the work of superstars, in forums other than Lightwave and try to do stuff at that level. At the very least turn out very nice, clean, big well lit and well surfaced renders, even if they are clay renders to show off modeling skills, don't scrimp, up the samples and do long renders if needed, and post process the images in Photoshop. And learn one of the well known programs just so you can say you use it even if your doing most things in Lightwave.

Because you might get a call from a big company.

spherical
09-15-2015, 01:55 AM
Agreed. Worked for me! :D And it's been extremely successful in a lot of differing media; not just 3D. These principles were being applied before 3D existed; except for the Real 3D, of course.... or that which we perceive as being Real.

Farhad_azer
09-15-2015, 02:00 AM
I am not gone yet and you are not late dear Spherical.

Excellent advices by spherical, thank you so so much, I will do my best to be the vehicle with high quality. I have the power of good and scientific talks and can give detailed and technical descriptions. if I only had 2 or 3 good works it would have been awesome but according to your statements maybe I can convey that feeling by my best self.

I have about 3 hours and am doing extra renders (lol) but I think I should go and meditate a little.

Dear spherical, your beautiful reply relieved some stress and fear. thanks for helping me.

MarcusM
09-15-2015, 02:16 AM
I remember my job interview, with two programmers, they don't know what i was talking about to them about 3D :)

Tim21
09-15-2015, 02:32 AM
gl farhad, maybe a tip: start some rendering and meditate during the needed rendering time :-)

Surrealist.
09-15-2015, 03:01 AM
Probably too late to the party. In the future use another title for the thread that stresses the time urgency.

But what I would have suggested in a situation like this where time is of essence, would be to take some of the supplied content and put the time into rendering and maybe some textures.

Since 3D is such a vastly diverse tool set, it would be completely acceptable to put together samples of rendering with existing work to show your skill level in that area.

spherical
09-15-2015, 03:47 AM
Dear spherical, your beautiful reply relieved some stress and fear. thanks for helping me.

You are most welcome. Please remember, there are no "stupid questions". My thoughts go with you.

pinkmouse
09-15-2015, 03:59 AM
First rule of interviews: "Don't Panic!"
Second rule of interviews: "Be yourself, not someone else"
Third rule of interviews: "Remember, you're interviewing them as well, ask lots of questions"

Good luck!

Farhad_azer
09-15-2015, 04:10 AM
Thanks everybody, I am turning off my PC after 10 minutes and before that I am going to read your replies.

I hope everything will be perfect.

I am humbled, thanks everybody for your help and supports <3

Farhad_azer
09-15-2015, 09:34 AM
I am back and I feel like....u know.

Today was a very difficult day and the interview session was really awkward. the guy did not want to see all of my works. I had brought there 3 avi files and some still images. anyway he stated that I am a hobbyist. the good thing is that he did not totally reject me and probably will give me a chance.

I think I am capable of making good stuffs but they will not look perfect due to lack of experience and more importantly bec of lack of my confidence.

I consider myself as a total looser in lots of things but there is one thing that I am proud. I have will power and work every moment to become someone in this market.

They probably will ask me to do sth for them. some visualization or small clip for their products.

Any other thoughts will be greatly appreciated.

Anyway I did my best fellas.

ernpchan
09-15-2015, 09:46 AM
I'm glad that is went for the most part well. Not sure what to make of the "hobbyist" remark. Everyone starts at zero and if you're working towards a career then your drive is going to be much higher than someone who just dabbles.

Good luck.

jeric_synergy
09-15-2015, 10:01 AM
If they'll probably ask you to do some stuff, you win!

Tim21
09-15-2015, 11:15 AM
If they'll probably ask you to do some stuff, you win!

I second that! congrats! :)

Greenlaw
09-15-2015, 12:39 PM
Lots of good advice here and I agree with most of what's been written. Here are a few more tips and anecdotes.

Preparation can make all the difference, and that needs to happen long before you get the call for a job interview.

My first job was a Junior Illustrator position for Pan Am back in the early '80s, supporting aerospace engineers at Cape Canaveral and Patrick Air Force Base. I was fresh out of high school and 'technically' inexperienced but I brought in a ridiculously huge portfolio of artwork to my interview. I threw in everything from drafting and design examples, production designs, fine art, and even comics. Some of the Senior artists there tested me by having me draw random objects they brought into the office. They hired me on the spot, and I was told a few years later that I was the only artist who brought such a diverse portfolio. Within a few years I was promoted to a Senior Illustrator position. I worked at Pan Am and Computer Sciences Raytheon as an artist for almost 15 years before leaving the aerospace industry to work in the advertising and entertainment fields. I can't say I planned for that path but I was always prepared to accept each opportunity as it presented itself.

There are plenty of opportunities out there but you need to be ready to open that door when it knocks. And if you miss out, don't worry about it...just be ready for the next one. I can recall one very awkward interview at a TV post facility in Hollywood. I decided to think of that as a 'practice interview' and moved on, but the studio called me back for a second interview a month later. This time I was more confident and I wound up working on a couple of TV shows for them, so it turned out very well.

That said, I generally agree with the above poster--you probably shouldn't bring too many examples to show (like I did and sometimes still tend to do. I'm not always good at following my own advice.) For some job interviews, showing too much can work against you. Years ago, I had experience with one recruiter where the person became overwhelmed by the diversity of what I did and they didn't know where to place me. And this was at an animation studio where I had actually done a lot of character and set design work a few years prior. Another example was when I went it for my interview at Rhythm & Hues. I got the job but years later my Supervisor told me that my demo reel had so much stuff on it that 1.) he wondered if I had actually done all of it, and 2.) since not all of it was my best work, it made him wonder if I could tell the difference between good and bad work. Fortunately, that had not stopped him from hiring me and I had a great 12 year run at Rhythm but it's something to think about. I think in general, it's best to show only a few of your best pieces to capture attention and raise curiosity, and show more examples when it's asked for or otherwise appropriate to the job. (Having an iPad or Android tablet is perfect for those occasions.)

Also, I've been very lucky to meet just the right people who knew what to do with me. This comes from making yourself and your work known, and building good relationships in the community you wish to work in. I think it's important to be confident and cultivate a positive image about yourself and your work.

And no matter how good you get at your work, don't be become arrogant about it. Nobody likes to work with a difficult personality, not for long anyway. :)

Hope this helps.

G.

spherical
09-15-2015, 03:10 PM
Today was a very difficult day and the interview session was really awkward.

One thing that I do to even the playing field on the nerves portion of it is to imagine everyone else in the room being naked. :D


the guy did not want to see all of my works. I had brought there 3 avi files and some still images.

Yes. That's the Less is More I spoke of earlier. Even if you have a lot of great stuff, you have to cull down to only the very best. Once you get to that point, cull again. Hit them hard with every punch. Very difficult process to distill, but it is important.


anyway he stated that I am a hobbyist.

Some people have no tact. Hearing that may not have been pleasant, but it was a confirmation, as you feel you're still learning. When it comes right down to it, we all are.


the good thing is that he did not totally reject me and probably will give me a chance.
They probably will ask me to do sth for them. some visualization or small clip for their products.

Sometimes things are not what they seem. Could be that after a little while, you'll come to mind and get another call. Here's one situation that happened to me:

I was on a trip to New York City showing my illustration portfolio to advertising agencies and media companies for a few days. One appointment was at CBS. They looked at my work, we talked for some time, another couple of people were called into the person's office to see what I do. They began asking somewhat odd questions, being interested in my clouds for some reason. Never said what they were working on and it didn't make an sense to me... at the time. The meeting concluded, I went on to other appointments and a couple of days later flew home.

The phone rang a couple of days after I had returned. They had a commission for me that they were requesting a quote and sketches on. My general thrust, to make a pun, has always been space and spaceflight. This was a commission for CBS Sports: The U.S. Tennis Open. Ummm... OK.... It was the clouds in my wildlife paintings that had caught their attention.

129759

The U.S. Tennis Open commission
129760
was a test.

What they were really interested in was far larger than that and they had to be sure I could deliver. This was more in my astro wheelhouse. The cover of James A. Michener's novel, SPACE.

129761

Guess they liked my fuzzy balls. :D The 48"x30" (122cm x 76cm) acrylic original hangs over our fireplace. One never knows what may be just around the corner. Getting out there and showing one's stuff is all it takes. I produced the primary cover art and five secondary formats to be used on many different products. It was a great commission. They both were.

I'm not sure where I've been published most. I'd be travelling and on the way to the plane would see my book cover in the stores lining the concourse. It's either that or the cover of Public Enemy's Fear of a Black Planet. Hard to tell.


I think I am capable of making good stuffs but they will not look perfect due to lack of experience and more importantly bec of lack of my confidence. I consider myself as a total looser in lots of things but there is one thing that I am proud. I have will power and work every moment to become someone in this market.

Confidence comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. :D You'll get there. From your evident writings, you're on a good path and have the fire inside necessary to stay the course.


Anyway I did my best fellas.

That is all any of can do. Don't give up. One of these days, you'll surprise yourself. :) You'll look in the mirror and ask: "How did I get here?"

BTW, to help your coming to mind some day down the road, do some preparation and contact them again in a month or so and request another interview. This will let them know you are serious and not a flash-in-the-pan. That is more what the "hobbiest" observation was about. Are you the real thing or just dabbling? Show that you are the former. If that doesn't happen to work immediately, wait a while and try again. Persistence carries a message all its own. Just don't make a pest of yourself. :D

jeric_synergy
09-15-2015, 05:54 PM
Mayhaps we can write up a syllabus for the young punks, I mean up-and-coming animators, to checkbox out to hone their skills and build their portfolios. In a stepping-stone fashion so that everything builds up to one CPU-thrashing crescendo (and we don't have to compete with them until it finishes rendering. In 2019.) .

Like, I dunno, maybe:


Flying text
flying logo
cartoon object/room
realistic object
complex jointed logo
cartoon character
cartoon walk cycle
cartoon character lip-synced
Flying text with particle and/or volumetric effects
Semi-realistic (stylized) character
(as above) lip sync
(as above) walk cycle
...

Something like that. --If you just do ALL the tutes in the Dan Ablan books, you'll have a pretty good reel.

(By stylized character, I'm thinking "Cowboy Bepop" level stuff.)

spherical
09-15-2015, 07:05 PM
Would be best to port this over to a new thread. Then it might be found by others looking for pointers and it doesn't hijack this one. If it turns into a quality collection, it then may be promoted to Sticky.

Farhad_azer
09-16-2015, 06:29 AM
You guys, besides your great advices there are a couple of things that I discovered during these hours. please correct me if I am wrong but it seems to me that a full project, even if it is simple, with audio and a context is a lot more intriguing than 3-4 seconds high end stuffs that is not designed for a company and is not commercial or sth. am I right or wrong?

If I had one clip with logos and music which has been broadcasted in some media then I would have convinced them more than a situation where I had sth like transformer effect composited realistically over a footage. it sure depends on the company that is hiring you but for commercial purposes I think the former is more acceptable.
anyway I will bookmark this page and read it from time to time and I will definitely contact them after a while.

I hope I am not taking too much time but if they call me and ask me to do some stuffs for them then what should I do? you replied some part of this questions but chances are that I will be able to make impressive results which still smells as "hobbyist materials".

I guess they will call me these days and I want to warm up myself without loosing seconds.

Greenlaw
09-16-2015, 09:14 AM
Finished commercial samples are always good reel fodder because it shows you can work professionally--meaning you can commit to a project and finish it, which is what clients are looking for. It also suggests that you can take directions and work with a team, which is what many animation and fx studios are looking for.

Personal samples are also good because they showcase your skills (assuming you created all the work yourself) and your passion for doing the work. (Otherwise, why would you be doing it?)

Obviously when you're starting out, you only have personal samples to show but if it's good stuff, that's all you need for somebody to take notice. Almost every pro user starts out that way. If you keep learning and improving, before you know it, your demo reel will have both types of work.

Tip: commercials, as opposed to TV and movie work, is a great way to build up a great diversity examples and styles very quickly because the commercial production schedules tend to be very short. It's demanding work but if you can take the pressure, it's also a great way to develop your skills quickly. With TV and movie production, chances are that you will be doing a lot of the same type of work for a long time and your reel will reflect that. Neither path is good or bad but keep in mind that you will generally be called in for what clients see on your reel.

Also keep in mind that you don't want to put anything on your reel that you did not enjoy doing--chances are, you'll be called in often to do just that task because nobody else likes doing it either.

G.

jeric_synergy
09-16-2015, 09:40 AM
Greenlaw knows far better than I: personally I detest the artificial crisis mentality in the commercial spot business (YTF didn't they simply allow more time? It's not a ******* solar eclipse.) so you have to choose your field of effort. And you BETTER enjoy it, because SUCCESS=LONG HOURS.

That said, I only popped in to post this link for Farhad: master the skills demo'd here, and you'll get work.
https://vimeo.com/user36384813/videos

Greenlaw
09-16-2015, 12:46 PM
Greenlaw knows far better than I: personally I detest the artificial crisis mentality in the commercial spot business (YTF didn't they simply allow more time? It's not a ******* solar eclipse.) so you have to choose your field of effort. And you BETTER enjoy it, because SUCCESS=LONG HOURS.

That said, I only popped in to post this link for Farhad: master the skills demo'd here, and you'll get work.
https://vimeo.com/user36384813/videos
Yes, it is annoying and generally unsustainable. I haven't worked on a commercial for a while but the schedules were definitely getting shorter and shorter, forcing more artists to go into heavy overtime. It's poor planning on the client's end as it often makes the jobs a lot more expensive for them; on the studio side, it can eventually lead to crew burnout. This was one of the reasons the Box got out of commercials in favor of video game cinematics; the hard grind was starting to affect our health. Plus, video games became more fun to work on.

That said, I usually had a lot of fun working on commercials too. And when I wasn't having fun on a particular production, at least the hurting was over with quickly. :)

G.

Farhad_azer
09-16-2015, 12:50 PM
Dear G, I am more than ready to take pressure and only death can stop me from doing what is necessary. thanks for great advices as usual.

Dear jeric_synergy, I did not totally understand what you mean by "master the skills demo'd here, and you'll get work". do u mean I should work on sth like those clips and replicate those? (replication=making them again???)

One more question please, I always thought that this is the only LW related part of forum and did not know there are different branches and I discovered some of them today. is it allowed or customary for someone to post his/her works in order to get advices and critics to improve the results? I am a little embarrassed that instead of asking for technical questions I ask general questions. I hope I will not be sent to jail bec of this :)

ernpchan
09-16-2015, 01:42 PM
Dear jeric_synergy, I did not totally understand what you mean by "master the skills demo'd here, and you'll get work". do u mean I should work on sth like those clips and replicate those? (replication=making them again???)


I think he means that you should master the basics and those skills will translate regardless the type of project. For example, a strong understanding of the principles of animation is valuable if the project is character animation or a flying logo. Understanding how to make good models is not specific to just building characters or a house.

Learn to walk before you can run.

ernpchan
09-16-2015, 01:47 PM
is it allowed or customary for someone to post his/her works in order to get advices and critics to improve the results?

There's a WIP Gallery section to post artwork to get feedback.
http://forums.newtek.com/forumdisplay.php?130-LW-Gallery-for-Work-In-Progress

MonroePoteet
09-16-2015, 02:51 PM
I think it also depends upon what kind of job you're looking for. If you work for a small studio or do independent work, you'll probably have to be a "jack of all trades" and at least be familiar with all aspects of animation. On the other hand, if you work for a large studio, you'll be part of a HUGE team and may be assigned similar work on subsequent projects based upon your chosen strengths. For example, in my case I have very little interest in character animation, while other people think this is the epitome of CGI capability and expertise. I tend to prefer landscapes and other envirionments and backdrops, atmospherics, lighting, architectural, mechanical, etc., so I mostly concentrate on those. Some people are superb modelers, but don't really want to construct the scenes, lighting, interactions and storylines. If I try to find a job in visual FX or do contract work, I'd try to communicate my personal interests and strengths to my potential employers and hope they assign me to something within my interests where I can excel.

mTp

spherical
09-16-2015, 03:11 PM
please correct me if I am wrong but it seems to me that a full project, even if it is simple, with audio and a context is a lot more intriguing than 3-4 seconds high end stuffs that is not designed for a company and is not commercial or sth. am I right or wrong?

Well, in the grand scheme of things, there really isn't a difference whether something is designed for a company or is commercial. IOW, all of the rock songs that have been re-purposed as commercial background music is an unrelated but very good example. Another is a trademark or trade name. Until it is extensively and widely used in conjunction with a company's product, it is just a shape or a word having no meaning. "Kleenex", when you forget about the facial tissue connection of it, doesn't mean anything in particular.

What this means is that you would do well to forget about the "commercial" and "corporate" aspect. Think up something that you have a strong connection to. That will be something that you will be intimate with and know well. Think of how best to share what you know of it with others. Tell some small, short story; whether it be animated or still. A still image can convey as much as an animation and do it in different ways. Sometimes, an animation would actually get in the way. Design it as if you were on commission; just forget about the fact that you aren't. The only real difference is that you aren't getting paid and there is no one telling you what to do/not do. Some of my most successful images were done for myself and later picked up by agencies or corporations for commercial use.

jeric_synergy
09-16-2015, 07:29 PM
JFTR, by 'commercial' I meant "television advertising". It was just stupid: virtually all the deadlines were foreseeable, and it was usually just incompetence and ego that made things hectic.

I'd prefer a lower rate to pulling an all-nighter: at my age that is b u l l s h i t.

spherical
09-17-2015, 12:17 AM
JFTR, by 'commercial' I meant "television advertising".

I was vacillating on that and chose the larger meaning, as it covered all the bases.


it was usually just incompetence and ego that made things hectic.

Yes, those are the usual causes.


I'd prefer a lower rate to pulling an all-nighter: at my age that is b u l l s h i t.

I do all-nighters all the time. It's the only time I can get a protracted period free of interruptions, so I can concentrate and get into the flow of a complex project. Keeping one's hand in, as regards all-nighters, is the only way to do it. Once you let that slip, it's gone forever. Use it or lose it. All-nighters are standard procedure in professional racing. At Penske Racing, we do whatever it takes, or the other team wins. My personal record now stands at 110 hours without sleep; while either winning an endurance race or working on a relatively benign 3D scene.

jeric_synergy
09-17-2015, 12:22 AM
Yeah: not for me.

Farhad_azer
09-18-2015, 09:13 AM
This experience was a huge one for me. whether I receive a call or not I still learned a lot. every morning I wake up with huge desire to fire up LW and some internet pages and put thoughts into work.

I only wish I had achieved these experiences after being interviewd with smaller company and I had done what djwaterman said from long time ago BUT I am not disappointed and feel very motivated.

mTp is also very true like others in his point thu Baku is not as big and active in CG as I dunno LA or Hollywood so my guess is that people like me should be generalist. fundamentally he like Greenlaw and spherical is totally right.

I still have some difficulty understanding jeric-synergy and would like to ask ernpchan why the section he introduced is kind of empty. maybe it is not routine in LW forum to post results in order to get feedback.

You guys are awesome and I am very happy to be with you.

Thanks again everybody for such a massive support.

Luc_Feri
09-19-2015, 08:51 AM
Best of luck Farhad!! But here is some advice from my experience, albeit relatively new to the industry.

Before I worked in 3D I compared myself to everybody on these forums, Modo forums, magazines and the internet. I was simply basing my skillset against WORLD class talent. To aim high is something I always did in whatever I wanted to achieve in life so this was a natural thing for me.

But, here is the thing. Once I started to work locally I realised that people thought I was talented, and I not only impressed people but blew other 3D people out of the water that had been doing this for years. WHY?

Once they started working they never pushed their limits to the maximum and got very lazy doing the same things over.

Quality and speed will come if you keep aiming high. I can't name companies but you wouldn't believe the job I did for a major branding agency in London and the client involved. This company is world class and didn't even have another guy to step in for someone on the sick and outsourced it to the guy I was freelancing for. They got the pitch too!!

It wasn't even an amazing render as I was still getting up to speed with V-Ray. I could have done 10X the quality had I worked from home using my own software.

So what am I getting at. There are tons of fakers, one trick people and flashy mouths that claim to be everything in this industry but when someone needs something technical doing they are finished.

Keep the faith!! :D

As others have said. Become a complete 3d generalist and you will not fail, others simply know a few tricks and how to impress with a few turbosquid models an HDRi and Photoshop. They will be found out once they get into the game!!! Work locally blow out the local competiton and go from there, i'm sure you can do it.

Farhad_azer
09-19-2015, 01:18 PM
I salute you Luc_feri, unbelievable that I agree with every single word that you said. I was just about to wirte in ffx post bec of your great post but I suddenly found out about your reply. maybe you have seen the move the secret.

anyway as I told others only death can stop me from achieving what I desire. I loveeeeeeeee Lightwave and I love the new family that I have found here and I am going to be on top real soon.

Thanks again, as you are reading this I have finished some good modeling and going to sleep. I will wake up early to do some texturing and animating,

Goodnight Lightwavers.

Luc_Feri
09-20-2015, 02:10 PM
Farhad, thank you for your kind comments!! :D

Your enthusiasm and friendly words to others inspired me to add some support and advice, you deserve all the success in the world with such a positive vibe!!!

jburford
09-24-2015, 07:00 AM
I'm ashamed to admit I've never heard of Baku, it looks fabulous.

The European Games were just held there this past summer. Only watched some of the precision shooting competitions though. Also, before that I had also never heard of it.

jburford
09-24-2015, 07:06 AM
Good Luck with everything Farhad, and keep on pushing your limits and keep on growing to reach your dreams.

Hope things work out best for you.

Farhad_azer
09-25-2015, 02:29 AM
Vielen danke my friend, yes I will do.

We have nice beer here btw :) I am not sure if it is as good as yours as I have not been there but maybe one day we can test it together LoL.

Farhad_azer
10-11-2015, 11:58 AM
This is a little embarrassing but I think I should talk about this a little more.

I called the company a couple of days ago (Our good friend spherical suggested me doing so and a friend of mine in Baku also said this is a good idea).

The lady who had sent me to the main interviewer told that boss has rejected me for unknown reason. I understand and I agree that he had right to do that. This lady was a very good and polite person and I honestly described her that even if I have not impressive portfolio but I am capable of being good worker for them(I really believe I am). I asked her to talk to the boss again (actually to the vice president) and give me another chance.

The reason I am telling this is first of all to bump the thread so other people like me read and learn form that. besides that I really am sad why this happened because I really hate my current job in university and really needed this job.

I wish I had read what djwaterman said long time ago but I have to admit 99% of people (including myself) never do obey good advices. we say that it is right and well said but we don't do that until we experience such a dire situation. Like those kids who never listen to their parents about washing their teeth until they end up in dentist room.

I learned a lot from this experience and come back to read ur replies from time to time.

One request please. Add a good solution for making good portfolio and going to job interview in sticky part of this forum. there are lots of Farhads out there.

Thanks again everybody.

Triodin
10-12-2015, 08:00 AM
This thread has restored my faith in humanity. Incredibly inspiring and motivating!

Even if this opportunity doesn't man out Farhad, your positive attitude will get you places!!

kyuzo
10-12-2015, 09:02 AM
"Be yourself, not someone else"Good luck!

Reminds me of one of my favourite T-shirts..
"Always be yourself. Unless you can be Batman. Then always be Batman."
:)

RIG
10-12-2015, 09:43 AM
is this thread a joke?

spherical
10-12-2015, 01:16 PM
is this thread a joke?

I am seriously contemplating how to respond to this..... My first thoughts you definitely wouldn't like; not that you'd like any of the others. Wow.

jeric_synergy
10-12-2015, 01:47 PM
I am seriously contemplating how to respond to this..... My first thoughts you definitely wouldn't like; not that you'd like any of the others. Wow.
Indeed. I metaphorically tied my hands.

spherical
10-12-2015, 04:44 PM
Indeed. I metaphorically tied my hands.

I'm still cogitating, but it may be best to leave that which I would write to the individual readers' imagination. Far more possibilities that way and I can "say" anything without breaking forum rules. :D

jeric_synergy
10-12-2015, 04:45 PM
Far too often I've neglected to sit on my hands. I'll wait for clarity.

Luc_Feri
10-13-2015, 03:32 AM
Keep the faith Farhad!!

Every obstacle faced is a lesson learned I say.

spherical
10-13-2015, 03:49 AM
If it doesn't kill you, it makes you stronger.

MonroePoteet
10-13-2015, 07:42 AM
is this thread a joke?

No.

Farhad: I'll repeat what I said before, which is try to find your own personal strengths and interests and concentrate on those. I use several YouTube searches on a regular basis to look for recent uploads of "animation", "VFX" and "visualization" videos to see what other people are doing currently. For example, here's the search query for recent uploads of VFX:

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_sort=video_date_uploaded&search_type=videos&search_query=%22vfx%22

I then try to reproduce some of them that are interesting to me, although a lot of them are not of interest to me. By focusing on your own interests and trying to reproduce animations you like, you'll build a portfolio which you can show off to prospective employers, and more importantly, talk excitedly and positively about how and why you created them. I think that showing honest excitement and interest in the works you've personally created will convey your willingness to invest in the work better than any plain talking will do.

Again, just my opinion.

mTp

kopperdrake
10-13-2015, 09:14 AM
I am seriously contemplating how to respond to this..... My first thoughts you definitely wouldn't like; not that you'd like any of the others. Wow.

Ignore him - he popped up purely to have a poke at the new LW teaser, and spread his little cloud of gloom around the forums.

Farhad - good luck in your search for that job, never let anyone tell you you can't do it. If they do, add them to the list of people you can one day prove wrong. At the age of 17 I needed a letter of support from an art teacher to gain entry to the art college I wanted to attend, after general college. My head of art refused to write me one as he "didn't believe I had it in me". Luckily my graphics teacher did believe in me, and I haven't looked back since. The big thing is to spend every minute you can gaining knowledge and honing skills - if you find hours disappear whilst you're busy creating, then you're doing something right :thumbsup:

Farhad_azer
10-14-2015, 09:37 AM
Thanks my friends,

I love reading instructions like this dear mTp and I believe I should do more on exploring like what you mentioned.(you said you repeat but this is the first time you are telling me this, maybe you are mistaking me by another one).

Thanks kopperdrake and very nice avatar picture.

I was embarrassed of my post but now I am proud of it. it happened to be a very informative and inspirational for me and other people like me.
I have started to make good stuffs and I believe this is due to stronger Farhad that spherical mentioned because I am not dead. I insist again that maybe we all should cooperate on collecting guidelines and helps for making better portfolio and avoiding mistakes that any beginner may encounter (as sticky thread and perhaps in gallery section) . will you please?

spherical
10-14-2015, 03:34 PM
Actually, I think this thread should qualify as a Sticky. The things that we have discussed go across the board, no matter what career goal a person may be pursuing or in which field. The experiences and direction that I shared happened, for the most part, before 3D content generation and output was even possible. The pervading thread through all of it is: Do what you love. It's the only thing that you'll be great at. My most basic definition of success is that you do what you love and other people like it, too.