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View Full Version : Slow Down. You値l Get There Faster.



WilliamVaughan
08-03-2015, 07:23 AM
I had a conversation with a student recently who was struggling to finish his assignments and meet deadlines. Project after project he simply ran out of time, but not from a lack of effort. While many of his classmates were watching the latest superhero movies on the big screen, he was glued to his seat feverishly plugging away on his assignment. He invested more time than most of the other students and worked extremely hard on every assignment. After a brief conversation with him, I discovered what was causing the problem. He was working hard instead of simply working smart and was missing a key component to the production process.

Read more here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/slow-down-youll-get-faster-william-vaughan?trk=prof-post

prometheus
08-03-2015, 08:15 AM
I have worked quite a bit in factories and a variety of industries.

I can tell from other workers and myself, it helps to have a bit of Lazy streak, you are then looking for ways to do things easier, not sure If is the same principles in action for the visualfx/graphics industry though....working smart instead of being lazy, sounds better though :) maybe it is has no relevance between them what so ever?

I came to this conclusion even without reading that article to get things done faster, I was being a bit Lazy...uhmm smart :) to the brink of being stupid.

Michael

WilliamVaughan
08-03-2015, 08:18 AM
I've always told people that I'm a lazy person. The problem with me being lazy is that I like to get alot of things done... so to be lazy and still get things done I have to work as efficient as possible.

50one
08-03-2015, 08:20 AM
"Work smart, not hard" - that's how the VFX is getting done for the B grade movies, for any AAA titles is "Work hard and then work some more".

Somebody should show this poor guy a production triangle and explain it.
Anyway, I think he was doing fine with his assignment trying to create something big, rather than fast and mediocre results his pals were submitting;)

S

Nicolas Jordan
08-03-2015, 09:57 AM
Having developed a painful case of tendonitis in various places in my arm due to working to much on the computer I have now taken the work smarter not harder advice very seriously and I'm slowly modifying everything I do in my work to minimize the time I spend on it but still end up with a great final result. Great article that we should all take seriously. Working smarter with a plan will leave us with more time for other things in life and less chance of developing RSI.

erikals
08-03-2015, 11:32 AM
yep, work smart... http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif
...and organize.

Nicolas, check out this thread for RSI treatment >
http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?145276-Best-solution-for-wrist-arm-pain-from-using-mouse

i swear by > Chinese Hammer Massage

prometheus
08-03-2015, 01:06 PM
I would think that a bit of reflection on the final result/goal might be of value, and having a sense of doing so...I would suspect that many folks might "paint" unrealistic visions of what they want to see in the end result, maybe that guy does to.
I reckon there is so many levels you can improve or enhance your work, that you might find yourself never to be finished... or one does not have the sense of determing when enough is enough.

I figure in a production environment, end results is determined by the budget and time mostly, which might help oneself to limit the final results to what is acheivable within those limits..it might be harder for a student to acknowledge what is needed, if the studen simply just want to produce the best results possible... and thus finding himself with an overwhelming task.

Doing work for your own personal amuse or personal reel, that could take forever if one choose to take that time of course, and depending on if you want to show something extraordinary...or something that just is good enough.

Michael

WilliamVaughan
08-03-2015, 01:13 PM
That's why I always recommend working big to small. There is never enough time... we always run out of time but if we work big to small you can always meet deadlines.

Chris S. (Fez)
08-03-2015, 01:20 PM
Having developed a painful case of tendonitis in various places in my arm due to working to much on the computer I have now taken the work smarter not harder advice very seriously and I'm slowly modifying everything I do in my work to minimize the time I spend on it but still end up with a great final result. Great article that we should all take seriously. Working smarter with a plan will leave us with more time for other things in life and less chance of developing RSI.

Why I am really enjoying the 3rd Power tools. Newtek needs to buckle down and reduce every click they can.

Great article!

spherical
08-03-2015, 04:41 PM
That which made me develop the sense of how best to wend my way through the maze of idea to image when working in traditional media is that, in that medium, there is no turning back. You must make the right decision the first time. Following the chosen path to the next step will either be successful or it won't. The string of decisions/steps add up and you eventually find yourself face to face the "Knowing When To Stop" problem. One wrong decision here can ruin the whole painting. Going one step too far can have disastrous consequences. "Do I want to take this chance?" Yes. No.

The other side of "Knowing When To Stop" is what one accepts as being "done". Stop too early, and your image doesn't stand up to examination and critique. It isn't a success. Accepting "good enough" is a slippery slope, so the two aspects must be balanced. Too often, I have viewed works where it was clear that the artist either didn't care enough or just plain didn't see what needed to be done. Sometimes, you can become blind to what is right before your eyes.

Taking those years of training and moving into digital painting, where there is suddenly Undo and Save As, was a double-edged sword. Yes, the pressure was off on the decision making aspect and I could take an image further than before by experimentation that had no downside. But, this experimentation could go on forever if one wanted. Again, "Knowing When To Stop"; but of a different flavor.

Moving from there into 3D Digital, the issue became even more acute. Now, if you want to change anything, do it, push the button and wait, Save As if desired and keep going into the sunset... then the sunrise. Far different from when it took manual dexterity and long hours of practice using ones brushes spreading colored goo to make a white canvas into an illusion of reality. Not everyone is able to learn the craft and the tools used within it. For those who can, that is where you hone your "working smart" skills, because it's painful when you screw up. A painting that you've worked on for a month getting reduced to scrap in one stroke is not taken lightly, let alone forgotten. Indeed, it can be a crushing experience.

Moving from 3D Digital into 3D Reality, I found myself back in the earlier Traditional Media situation... on steroids. One added dimension makes a world of difference in degree of difficulty. Not only did it have to be created by hand using manual tools, power tools and discernment; it had to look good and actually work in a one gee gravity field. Making an illusion in paint or pixels is one thing. Things can float, for one. They don't have to be bolted to something to keep from falling. Components must fit together, bearings have to turn, gears have to mesh with proper tolerance.

I love working in 3D; often using these tools to create the illustrations that I did with traditional media. Now, if I choose, I can animate them. I can provide many angles of view from the one asset. For working in 3D Reality, I design the end product in 3D Digital first, so I may better understand and work out issues before the cutting takes place. This is a good thing.

The bad, for traditional media artists is that, now, a blizzard of others who have no natural ability, manual dexterity or training in the required tools can, through the collective "hiring" of hundreds of others (programmers), produce very acceptable imagery; where only a sub-set could previously. The role of the traditional media illustrator has gone the way of the buggy whip. A different dexterity is now required; that of understanding extremely complex tools: nodes; UV maps, hypervoxels, expressions, keyframes, points/polys/edges, Booleans, bones, metameshes, Radiosity, caching of various types and when to use them.... the list is nearly endless and mind boggling. Learning these tools is difficult as well, but it's a different discipline. A different mindset. One requiring just as much, if not more, concentration and focus over time; following a logical path to the end. Training the muscles doesn't matter as much anymore; in fact, it matters very little.

Through it all, the one common is training one's brain, and that's where Working Smart comes in.

prometheus
08-03-2015, 07:30 PM
That which made me develop the sense of how best to wend my way through the maze of idea to image when working in traditional media is that, in that medium, there is no turning back. You must make the right decision the first time. Following the chosen path to the next step will either be successful or it won't.

The other side of "Knowing When To Stop" is what one accepts as being "done". Stop too early, and your image d.

Uhhmm..partly true, but neither oil or sculpting in plasteline is strictly undoable, watercolor more so, but oil can be pushed and changed if needed and if you know how too, and plasteline, well that is undoable quite a lot :)
sketching with pencil, well, always try to just draw light as a feather to hint the form, re-draw where needed and then there is erasers, after that...fill in with stronger strokes.

and yes..donエt stop to early and donエt stop to late, that is the balance which needs to be found in all art forms I guess.

Praise the tolerance of michelangelo, repainting the vatican ceiling after realizing it had the wrong perspective after having worked too close to the ceiling, and then talk about undoable work, working that marble block and chipping away to form David and Pieta, I wonder if Michelangelo was completly satisfied or if he should have chipped a bit more, or less? :)

BokadCastle
08-03-2015, 11:27 PM
...or if he should have chipped a bit more, or less? :)

he should have chipped a bit more off the right hand - it's huge.


"David is tall exactly 14 feet and 3 inches high.
His right hand is disproportionately large compared to the body. Why? Because in the Middle Ages, David was commonly said to be of 杜anu fortis strong of hand."

http://www.turismo.intoscana.it/allthingstuscany/tuscanyarts/michelangelo-david-facts/

prometheus
08-04-2015, 06:49 AM
he should have chipped a bit more off the right hand - it's huge.


"David is tall exactly 14 feet and 3 inches high.
His right hand is disproportionately large compared to the body. Why? Because in the Middle Ages, David was commonly said to be of 杜anu fortis strong of hand."

http://www.turismo.intoscana.it/allthingstuscany/tuscanyarts/michelangelo-david-facts/

Thanks, interesting facts...I sure would like to visit florens and look at those artworks, someday.

BokadCastle
08-08-2015, 08:03 PM
Interesting Pieta here (zbrush) -
https://lowrez.artstation.com/portfolio/pieta-reconstruction

Sensei
08-09-2015, 06:22 AM
Hard way: walk to river for water every day twice.
Smart way: dig channel/well once, then pipes to all houses in village, and have fresh water on demand.

Hard way: harvest field by hand (like humans used to for thousands years, some in Africa and Asia still do)
Smart way: borrow/buy/catch bull, and force him to do it. For the last 100 years: buy tractor (but it has drawbacks= need to buy fuel=spend more money. That remainds me some Japanese who started making his own fuel from remains from his own field)

That's why Europeans and colonisators in America, Australia, were so successful. Could find easier way to do things, and have more time for thinking even more.

In modeling one of such smart ways would be reusing parts of body, items, etc. from one project to another,
instead of preparing f.e. hand every time from scratch,
have hand modeled once,
and then glue part to other project object..

spherical
08-09-2015, 03:28 PM
Frankenmodeling.