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WilliamVaughan
07-28-2015, 11:03 AM
I’ve recently come to the conclusion that the average 3 year old plays a more active role in learning than the average young adult. Read more here:

Learn like a 3 year old! (https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/learn-like-3-year-old-william-vaughan?trk=prof-post)

prometheus
07-28-2015, 12:41 PM
I’ve recently come to the conclusion that the average 3 year old plays a more active role in learning than the average young adult. Read more here:

Learn like a 3 year old! (https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/learn-like-3-year-old-william-vaughan?trk=prof-post)

why do I have to learn like this? :D

a quick reflection, I think a child at that age doesnīt have any social restrictions, such as kids in later years or students in higher classes, where many students simply fear to ask questions and many are afraid they might be making a fool of themself in front of the group, or if alone with the teacher..if the respect isnīt there that could also pose a problem, and that restricts them.
They may feel like that, and especially those with low self esteem.
and even with many adults it seems like that, people afraid to ask or share their thoughts in various gatherings, you got to be social correct, and that getīs in the way I think.

WilliamVaughan
07-28-2015, 12:58 PM
Buy Why?

:D

Personally... I wont let the fear of looking "stupid" ever get in my way of wanting to get an answer... unless of course I'm traveling with my girlfriend and get lost and need to ask directions :P

Waves of light
07-28-2015, 01:43 PM
Very thought provoking thread William.

Slartibartfast
07-28-2015, 01:52 PM
Personally... I wont let the fear of looking "stupid" ever get in my way of wanting to get an answer... unless of course I'm traveling with my girlfriend and get lost and need to ask directions :P

LOL!

I've watched several hours of MIT open courseware on youtube, and the lecturers throw out candy to those few students who ask (intelligent) questions. Although it's kinda cute I think it's just what that article is about. I mean, shouldn't the answers themselves be the candy?!

WilliamVaughan
07-28-2015, 02:25 PM
LOL!

shouldn't the answers themselves be the candy?!


you would think so.

prometheus
07-29-2015, 10:44 AM
monkeys get bananas for candy when picking the right symbols
dogs get their snacks after doing the right thing.

we need rewards to be motivated, I canīt figure out the cat training though :) sure they take the snack, but do they learn or behave because of the snack...donīt think so, guess they donīt need to learn and be a good cat, as long as they can get away with purring and cuddle up next to you...no need to do fancy tricks or behave other than that, they must have learned that though..thatīs all it takes to get fed and go about their business in the house.

c.1
07-29-2015, 07:43 PM
I love asking " why ?" (Even just to piss people off sometimes)
At the corporate level I pushed the question "why must we do this , it makes no sense?" With the final answer being "because we say so"
A lot of times the answer is " thats just the way it is, deal with it"
Both answers completely useless and unacceptable but I think they are far more common than a well thought out and constructive answer.

WilliamVaughan
07-29-2015, 08:25 PM
I love asking "What problem does this solve?" So many managers change things for no good reason... Change can be a good thing but it's usually a good idea to make a change to try and solve a problem.

CaptainMarlowe
07-30-2015, 12:08 AM
There's a moto in my job : there are on stupid questions, but sometimes stupid answers. :)