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campbellmedia
02-10-2015, 12:08 PM
I know the Tricaster's hard drives easily pop out of the system, is there any way to have some kind of casing or port that will allow me to pull out the media drive from the tricaster, and easily plug it into a windows desktop computer?

we're just trying to find options to speed up the post production process. pulling out or portable tricaster system, hooking up a monitor, then exporting to an external hard drive (which takes a while), then plugging that external hard drive into an editing computer of ours, transferring that off and onto our computer's media drive, and then importing into Adobe Premiere and waiting for it to index takes so long. It would be so much easier if we could just disconnect the hard drive from the tricaster and just connect it to our computer, so all we have to do is boot up, and import the file into Premiere.

kltv
02-10-2015, 12:44 PM
The easiest way is to pick up a SATA dock. You can get them with USB. So basically, you pop the drive out of the TriCaster, pop it into the dock and you are good to go.

Something like this: http://www.amazon.com/StarTech-com-Docking-Station-2-5in-3-5in/dp/B005JFUI6M/ref=sr_1_2?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1423597334&sr=1-2

They have them at my local Best Buy.

Kris

campbellmedia
02-10-2015, 02:56 PM
Awesome! That's like exactly what I was looking for. Have you used one yourself with the Tricaster or know someone who has?

kltv
02-10-2015, 03:19 PM
Yep. I've used them. Keep in mind you'll lose a bit of speed going through USB 2 or 3, since it isn't as fast as the internal SATA (in the TriCaster) or external eSATA connection. But it works well for most things. If you happen to have eSATA ports on your edit stations, I'd go for an eSATA version of that dock. If not, go for the USB. USB 2 speeds are around 500 Mbps, USB3 up to 5 Gbps and eSATA would get you the most direct connection without any translation and best possible speeds with the drive.

Here's the eSATA version - http://www.amazon.com/Thermaltake-BlacX-eSATA-Docking-Station/dp/B001A4HAFS

Kris

Frogman1206
02-11-2015, 08:12 AM
I've used those docks for years. Put one or two at every workstation and things get real portable without an expensive network. When I was doing more independent work I had two for each of my workstations. One for working files and one for backup. Each day at the end just drag files to the backup drive. If I need to work at a different station just grab the drive and drop it in the dock and go to work.

One thing to keep in mind though. If for some reason you have a power surge that your protectors can't handle it will toast everything you have hooked up. I always had my backup dock unplugged from power and the USB port. When it was time to back up just plug in and go. Don't want to toast your back up and your main drives. Trust me Murphy's Law will kick in when you least expect it even if you think your system is bullet proof.

campbellmedia
02-11-2015, 09:53 AM
thank you all for the great advice! I think we'll be purchasing one of these very soon, it should really help speed up our post productions from our production truck

campbellmedia
02-11-2015, 10:25 AM
http://i.imgur.com/hz8rRQr.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/ff83xLq.jpg

This is what our hard drive looks like when pulled out of the tricaster. Would this still fit in those USB bays from Amazon?

kltv
02-11-2015, 11:10 AM
Those are power supplies, not hard drives. If you've got an 8000 or 860, there are two of those power supplies in the back. The hard drives are in the front on the right side of the box in four bays.

Kris

kltv
02-11-2015, 11:20 AM
126992

Here's where to find the drives.

Kris

SBowie
02-11-2015, 11:41 AM
Now that that has been sorted out, I might mention that you can hotswap the drives - no need to reboot.

campbellmedia
02-11-2015, 12:05 PM
yea, we have two tricasters. The one in our studio has a hard drive in the front just like you showed, but our tricaster that we keep in the production truck doesn't have a hard drive in the front 4 bays. It's only two of those power supplies in the back. So i guess one of those in the back is where our media is being stored and the other is the operating system. We'll just have to buy a new hard drive to put in the front so we can use that for swapping in and out.

And thank you SBowie! That makes things a little easier!

kltv
02-11-2015, 12:27 PM
Neither one of those devices in the back are capable of storing any media. They are electrical power supplies for the system. They do not contain hard drives. You shouldn't be removing those power supplies unless one of them fails and needs to be replaced… indicated by an obnoxious beeping noise and red light on the supply.

The system/OS drive is located internally and not removable. The TriCaster should actually not be working properly with no media drives in those front drive bays. You need to have at least one media drive to launch into a session for live production. I'd start up that TriCaster in the truck and make sure things are working properly. If you fire up the TriCaster and start a new session, see if you have options under the "Volume" drop down. You should see D, E, F, G. If those are there, those drives are loaded in the front. If not, somebody swiped your drives.

Kris

campbellmedia
02-11-2015, 12:48 PM
Neither one of those devices in the back are capable of storing any media. They are electrical power supplies for the system. They do not contain hard drives. You shouldn't be removing those power supplies unless one of them fails and needs to be replaced… indicated by an obnoxious beeping noise and red light on the supply.

The system/OS drive is located internally and not removable. The TriCaster should actually not be working properly with no media drives in those front drive bays. You need to have at least one media drive to launch into a session for live production. I'd start up that TriCaster in the truck and make sure things are working properly. If you fire up the TriCaster and start a new session, see if you have options under the "Volume" drop down. You should see D, E, F, G. If those are there, those drives are loaded in the front. If not, somebody swiped your drives.

Kris

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yohh4Izleuo

Here's a video i just shot of our setup. As you can see, we have no drives in the front bays. This is how it was when we bought it direct from Tricaster. It is a TCXD860. Not sure if that makes any difference. But as you can see in the video, we have no drives in the front, and only those two power supplies in the back. But when I look on the desktop of Windows, it shows i have a C drive and a D drive for Media, where all our footage goes. And you can see, even without the drives in the front, I can still turn the system on, i can load up tricaster, i can open a project (one of several), and I can record footage, all of which is stored on the D drive, which is where we go to retrieve it.

So i'd have to say, it is possible to still have the system running and not have drives in the front. The question is then, where is this D drive? Do you think they partitioned the internal hard drive that we can not reach?

And how difficult is it to reassign the tricaster to record our media to a new hard drive (that we'll be going out to buy) that we will place in the front so we can easily swap it out?

JPulera
02-11-2015, 01:35 PM
Older TriCasters such as the 855 used to come populated with the removable drives. They now ship without "Media Drives". The OS is on an SSD, with a single 3TB SATA drive inside for video storage. Each SATA drive can record 2 video streams. An 860 can record 8 streams, so you can add 3 drives to the front bays, for a total of 4 drives to record to (two streams each).

What kind of drives? Recommend SATA 6GB with 64mb cache, 7200rpm. Such as Western Digital Caviar Black or Seagate Barracuda. Off-the-shelf units available everywhere. Avoid "green" drives, they lack performance. Just pop a drive in, then format as NTSF via Windows, and ready to go then. Any size, 1TB, 2TB, 3TB, your choice.

Thanks

Jeff Pulera
Safe Harbor Computers

campbellmedia
02-11-2015, 01:45 PM
awesome! thanks!!

JPulera
02-11-2015, 02:25 PM
Figure you will get roughly 20 hours of HD recording per 1TB of storage.

Jeff

GCsid
03-06-2015, 01:04 PM
I am also looking to speed up the process of post production with my tricaster. I have a TCXD300. Would a SATA dock help me out as well. I do not have a hard drive I can pop in and out though. Or I do not belive I do. Would this help or is there a better way you know of that could help me get footage off my tricaster so I can convert it and edit it in a much more effiecent manner?

kanep
03-06-2015, 01:46 PM
The TCXD300 should have a eSATA port on the back of the unit. If so, connect a eSATA drive (or dock) and you should be good.

I would recommend going with a eSATA external drive over the dock. Don't get me wrong, I've got a dock and really like it, but if during a production someone bumps into the table with the dock on it, the hard drive in it can loose the connection for a split second, just long enough to ruin your day.

macjundi
03-06-2015, 02:23 PM
This might be more than what the original poster's asking... but... the ideal thing to do is to have a good NAS, record directly via gigabit ethernet, and the edit station can be hooked up to the same NAS. As soon as the Record is done, the editor having access to the files can edit in place immediately with the need of transferring anything... I have personally use and highly recommend ProMAX. They have several models from Portable to the higher end ProMAX Online (expandable upwards of 3PB) they come with simple MAM, and built in Transcoder, and much more.

Today, I used it to record 22 HD Channels simultaneously (Quicktime 422) from 6 TC8000 into 1 ProMAX Studio (This is to record all the ISO and PGM of JavaJazz Festival)... not a single hiccups... barely use only 15% of utilization... The limitation is the Gigabit ethernet... that's why I had to use 6 TC8000.

I just thought I share it here... :)

EventsHd
03-16-2015, 02:50 PM
This might be more than what the original poster's asking... but... the ideal thing to do is to have a good NAS, record directly via gigabit ethernet, and the edit station can be hooked up to the same NAS. As soon as the Record is done, the editor having access to the files can edit in place immediately with the need of transferring anything... I have personally use and highly recommend ProMAX. They have several models from Portable to the higher end ProMAX Online (expandable upwards of 3PB) they come with simple MAM, and built in Transcoder, and much more.

Today, I used it to record 22 HD Channels simultaneously (Quicktime 422) from 6 TC8000 into 1 ProMAX Studio (This is to record all the ISO and PGM of JavaJazz Festival)... not a single hiccups... barely use only 15% of utilization... The limitation is the Gigabit ethernet... that's why I had to use 6 TC8000.

I just thought I share it here... :)
Hey what was the model number of ProMax you use.