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Nicolas Jordan
01-18-2015, 06:53 AM
I have been doing more work than usual at my computer over the last month and noticed pain beginning to develop in various parts of my hand and arm all the way into my shoulder. I guess this is what is referred to as repetitive stress injury which can lead to other potential problems as well.

I have done my own research and found a couple possible solutions. I have started using a Wacom Bamboo tablet to do my work but even after playing around with the settings I have found it hard to get used to. I heard about the ergonomic mouse from 3M seen here http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/904728P/3m-ergonomie-maus-em550gpl.jpg?boundedSize=310

I think I'm going to order one of these 3M mouses and give it a try although I read it does not have a scroll wheel.

Has anyone else experienced pain from using a standard mouse and what worked for you? Any other suggestions are welcome.

djwaterman
01-18-2015, 08:42 AM
Yeah, last year I was starting to develop serious pains as you described, it's good that you have caught it and started taking action. It's that tiny one finger mouse clicking that starts it, seems like nothing but that muscle is going all the way up your arm. Simple things can affect it, desk height, where your hand contacts the desk, is your arm positioned in an ever so slightly compromised pose because of something you have just become accustomed to over time.

Just by making changes you can slowly turn it around, my issues have pretty much disappeared.

Nicolas Jordan
01-18-2015, 08:53 AM
I guess putting the mouse at the correct reach and height is supposed to help. I also read that mousing from the elbow more instead of the wrist is also supposed to help but I find making accurate/small movements using the elbow to be more difficult.

ernpchan
01-18-2015, 09:15 AM
Actually working from your shoulder would be better. Uses more muscles. I switch between using a stylus and ergonomic mouse while I work. It helps vary up the repetition.

Slartibartfast
01-18-2015, 09:50 AM
Running + training at the gym cured me :-)

Mr Rid
01-18-2015, 10:46 PM
Many years ago I had carpal pain in my right hand, so I switched to using my left hand for some days, and the problem went away for good.

I can NOT find a decent mouse, and I dont care for tablets. I have no idea why most mice all have the same overly narrow shape that forces your hand to scrunch in an unnatural position. The Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Mouse was the most comfortable by far(!), which is simply like a half sphere shape and is like cupping a ball. Very natural feeling. And it worked on even my gloss-black desk, without a mousepad.
126591

I dont know what took so long for someone to come up with such a simple design. But the problem with that model for me is the bottom surface that touches the mousepad is a full ring around the underside instead of a few pads, so the greater surface area increases friction and the cursor would jitter slightly when making fine strokes. How long have they been making mice(?), and they still cant get these simple, obvious things right.

MSherak
01-19-2015, 12:44 AM
I use to have wrist pains then I use a good thick leather wristband and a mouse pad with a soft wrist rest to elevate my hand. Helps a ton with easing the tension placed on the tendons. No more pain.

-M

bobakabob
01-19-2015, 12:50 AM
Try a vertical mouse - at work I use a cheap Accuratis from Amazon. Comfortable and it prevents the unnatural twisting of your forearm. Also worth using your Wacom stylus whenever you can, you'll get used to it. Switching the mouse to my left hand helped when pain was bad but the worst thing you can do is try to work through it. It's likely to be an inflamed nerve and repetitive strain requires a lot of time to heal. Ibuprofen is good for temporary relief but they're not good to take over time. A combination of posture and overwork is likely to be the cause.

Aim to sit up straight with small pillow support for your lower back and mouse in easy reach with top of monitor at eye level. If posture is bad and you're straining forwards you can damage your neck, back and / or shoulder and received pain in the arm and wrist is the result. Also too much clicking of the mouse can damage muscle sheaths over time which don't heal properly and cause nerve damage. In my case I developed a trapped nerve in my neck last year and the referred pain in my right arm was agonising. Very scary at its worst but mostly avoidable and it with good diet exercise and rest it will go in time. Good luck!

KurtF
01-19-2015, 06:54 PM
For me I turned to something simple. I moved the mouse to my left hand. It does take a while to get used to, but it changes the muscles and relieves the constant strain on your right hand (or vice versa).

lightscape
01-19-2015, 07:38 PM
Running + training at the gym cured me :-)

Best advice. People just don't exercise enough.

erikals
01-19-2015, 08:01 PM
Wacom / Mouse switching
Massage
Breaks
ShortCuts
AHK
Good Keyboard

for repetitive tasks AHK is the solution, a must (!)

Exercise helps too, but can't compete with proper Massage by far
this one is nice >
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwySYtmtQxg

but Chinese Hammer Massage is King http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/king.gif
here done with a Hot Ball Peen Hammer, it's fantastic, just don't over do it...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_x1WlefJCs

read the comments on the video... >
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_x1WlefJCs


you can thank me later http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/wink.gif

note, rounded rubber hammer is a bit better if you skip the heat-up-hammer part...
personally i skip the part heating up the hammer, but you can do this if you want to...


a Buck Hammer could be good >
http://www.lhasaoms.com/Buck-Hammer-Neurological.html#.VL3U5y5ilM4

Sekhar
01-19-2015, 09:42 PM
I stopped using mouse some ten years back because it was hurting and have been using a Wacom Intuos tablet since. It's been fantastic for me all these years and not a single issue with pain. I strongly suggest trying out a better tablet than a Bamboo, ideally an Intuos. I had tried Bamboo many years back and returned it because it was awful.

toeknee
01-20-2015, 12:41 AM
Hi Nicolas, I would have to agree with Sekhar. I switched to a Wacom tablet in the late nineties and I never have issues with my hands. The common work day is eight hours of 3D, Photoshop, video editing illustrator work and so on. Then I work at home from about 10PM to around 3:00 AM doing animation and composting and I never have any hint of discomfort. I know that many people have a hard time switching to a tablet. For example my wife is a graphic designer and she is only mouse. I bought a good tablet but she will have nothing to do with it. She works about half the hours per day that I do and she is always complaining about hand fatigue. I also feel that the pen is more efficient in movement. This means that I can work faster. This part might be bull **** but it does feel faster. Good luck.

Sekhar
01-20-2015, 07:36 AM
About Intuos, Wacom seems to have renamed their tablets, and the old "Intuos" is now "Intuos Pro." Be sure to try this and not the regular "Intuos" tablets. Also, the new Intuos Pro tablets now have touch sensitivity so you can use your fingers for pinch/zoom and gestures...my tablet is old, so I don't know how that works.

spherical
01-20-2015, 03:45 PM
I gave up on standard mouse types years ago. Takes too much desk space, unnatural twist to forearm and fur getting caught up in the ball. Have gone through a series of trackballs, as the tech evolved. Always chose the style that uses one's thumb on the ball. My SO has one that the ball is centered, with buttons to either side. Can't stand using if for long. Of course, my hands are large, so that has something to do with it.

Anyhoos, the upshot of all this is that I made an angled support for the trackball, rotating it to the right by about 15 degrees, that allows my forearm to remain untwisted. It and the keyboard are on a pull-out drawer that I made, using heavy duty drawer slides, before there were any on the market that were worth anything. Its surface has an extension out past the right-hand slide to hold the trackball. This keeps the two slides in close on both sides at the extents of the keyboard, where the central pressure is. Very stable. Now, of course, I'll have to make a new surface that will have a matching extension on the left side to hold the SpaceMouse Pro; :D which is essentially a different style of trackball.

We have Intuos Pros as well. I use it on my lap. My SO has it on her desk above her KB drawer. I find this to be too far to comfortably reach for extended periods and don't have as much fine control, because of the unnatural position.

sukardi
01-20-2015, 05:33 PM
Just to share my experience - it is probably rare but just in case. I tried all kinds of mouse and tablets etc but still have problems.

After medical checkup, it turns out to be some vitamin defficiency. Nowadays I take vitamin supplements and all is well...

Nicolas Jordan
01-20-2015, 06:16 PM
I gave up on standard mouse types years ago. Takes too much desk space, unnatural twist to forearm and fur getting caught up in the ball. Have gone through a series of trackballs, as the tech evolved. Always chose the style that uses one's thumb on the ball. My SO has one that the ball is centered, with buttons to either side. Can't stand using if for long. Of course, my hands are large, so that has something to do with it.

Anyhoos, the upshot of all this is that I made an angled support for the trackball, rotating it to the right by about 15 degrees, that allows my forearm to remain untwisted. It and the keyboard are on a pull-out drawer that I made, using heavy duty drawer slides, before there were any on the market that were worth anything. Its surface has an extension out past the right-hand slide to hold the trackball. This keeps the two slides in close on both sides at the extents of the keyboard, where the central pressure is. Very stable. Now, of course, I'll have to make a new surface that will have a matching extension on the left side to hold the SpaceMouse Pro; :D which is essentially a different style of trackball.

We have Intuos Pros as well. I use it on my lap. My SO has it on her desk above her KB drawer. I find this to be too far to comfortably reach for extended periods and don't have as much fine control, because of the unnatural position.

I have thought about making some kind of tilting mousing surface to untwist my forearm similar to what you described you have done for your trackball.

Nicolas Jordan
01-20-2015, 06:21 PM
Thanks everyone for your advice and suggestions. This gives me lots of ideas and possible ways I might be able to relieve the pain and correct this problem. I think part of what might have brought this on is that I have had an unusually busy month at the computer.

spherical
01-21-2015, 04:14 PM
Another device that helps is an arm rest that clamps to a table or keyboard drawer and moves in X & Z with cantilevered arms that hold an oval cylindrical cradle for your forearm to rest upon. Z is adjustable by worm screw to bring the cradle to the optimum height. This takes the pressure off your hand and wrist, while allowing forward/back/side movement. Usually can be found in "back shops" that cater to ergonomic products.
126618


I have thought about making some kind of tilting mousing surface to untwist my forearm similar to what you described you have done for your trackball.

The difficulty with an angled surface is that the mouse likely won't stay put, once you remove your hand, due to the ~20 degree incline. The trackball just stays put, because it's designed not to move.

cove
01-27-2015, 01:36 PM
Thought id add my experience to this topic.
Im on my computer all day every day and have to cope with a forearm problem that i have.
My forearms can get very fatigued/tired if i over use my hands/arms.
To help avoid any repetative strain and or fatigued issues when using my computer i decided
to buy the smallest/lightest mouse i could find.
I found the basic "Logitech 100 [My choice with cable]" ideal and its one of the cheapest as well!.
Could do with being a little bit broarder but theres no reason why you cannot glue a strip of shaped sterifoam
iether side of the mouse. You may still have some foam in your original computer box.
I also thought about the surface of the computer mat in terms of mouse resistance as, up to a point, the smoother the surface
the better.
I found that a cutout piece of card board from a large cornflakes cerial packet had a noticably improved effect on the gliderbility of the mouse.
Use the plain side [not the side with graphics on/to smooth].
I rarely have a problem with my forearms now.
Hope what ive said helps you with your problem.
Regards. KEN.

Cageman
01-27-2015, 02:56 PM
Use your hands for other things off working hours. I play drums, guitar, bass and some piano... and I've noticed a significant increase in both energy as well as no pains. Some years back I had those issues as well, but when I got back to music and all that stuff, it quickly got away. :)

erikals
01-27-2015, 07:06 PM
Use your hands for other things off working hours. I play drums, guitar, bass and some piano... and I've noticed a significant increase in both energy as well as no pains. Some years back I had those issues as well, but when I got back to music and all that stuff, it quickly got away.

interesting... seems that could very well be a good idea... http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif

Danner
01-28-2015, 01:34 AM
I've been using a wacom for 9 years but I still don't use it for everything, I use it in tasks where it's superior, like image editing and modeling.

CorsaOPC
01-28-2015, 02:58 AM
Well... playing this song once per two days makes me feel nothing even when working with the worst mouse ever!:D:D:D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpvX5ym2QSs

djwaterman
01-28-2015, 04:33 AM
If I could do that I'd probably give up 3D.

gristle
01-28-2015, 12:16 PM
I use the middle button and scroll a lot in both CAD programs I use. When tilting scroll wheels were introduced, the microswitch was replaced with a lower profile switch which requires a harder click. This coupled with the unstable 4 way wheel and a small contact area (for finger) caused the first arm pain I've had using computers. The simpler the mouse the better, but prefer the Logitech MX 518. Quite hard to find however.

Tranimatronic
01-28-2015, 12:40 PM
Just to share my experience - it is probably rare but just in case. I tried all kinds of mouse and tablets etc but still have problems.

After medical checkup, it turns out to be some vitamin defficiency. Nowadays I take vitamin supplements and all is well...

I pretty much had to give up 3d on a nighttime, Im a developer during the day & my neck & shoulders hurt so much now that it wakes me up at night.
Im trying stretches and a standing desk (helps the neck, but not the shoulders). Going to physio next week.

Very curious at WHICH vitamins you mention you were deficient in ?? ALL of them ?

Nicolas Jordan
01-28-2015, 02:01 PM
I got the 3M mouse and it takes a bit of getting used to but seems to be much easier on the wrist and forearm but I still seem to get pain in the shoulder. I have a bow flex workout machine that I have not used in years so I think I'm going to try a light workout routine to see if that helps. Before I got the 3M mouse I used my Bamboo for over a week. It relieved some pain but eventually I got pain in the fingers from using it. I may also have to look at multi vitamin supplements like what has been mentioned since it's possible I could be lacking something as well.

sukardi
01-28-2015, 05:04 PM
I pretty much had to give up 3d on a nighttime, Im a developer during the day & my neck & shoulders hurt so much now that it wakes me up at night.
Im trying stretches and a standing desk (helps the neck, but not the shoulders). Going to physio next week.

Very curious at WHICH vitamins you mention you were deficient in ?? ALL of them ?

Mine was some B vitamins. You must do a medical check up first as most probably it will be slightly different for each person ..

CorsaOPC
01-29-2015, 02:03 AM
If I could do that I'd probably give up 3D.

Οk. we could change skills... i want 3d more than this! :P

tonyrizo2003
01-29-2015, 02:16 AM
I had a similiar situation many years back when I was putting in 14-16 hour days, went to using both hands to do the work and would ice my wrists with a gel pack. You can also get something like this. http://www.walgreens.com/store/c/walgreens-ice-%26-heat-wrap-multi-purpose/ID=prod3874199-product

http://www.quill.com/fellowes-gel-wristrests/cbs/040767.html?cm_mmc=CSE_AMZ_040767

I also changed to a very light wireless mouse, as well as changed my posture in the way that I sit as well as the chair; Check out this link http://www.wikihow.com/Set-Up-an-Ergonomically-Correct-Workstation

good luck hope that helps.

zardoz
01-29-2015, 05:08 AM
well I had some problems on my right hand, then when I started using the wacom tablet all those problems were gone. now from time to time I have to use one of these
126730
on my left hand!...because most software use alt, shift, ctrl, etc...so sometimes I have a lot of pain on my left hand. It would be great if we could configure those keys...

erikals
01-29-2015, 05:24 AM
yes, those are very good too, used something similar... http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif


It would be great if we could configure those keys...
if you use PC, you can use autohotkey to configure them...
you might wanna check >


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=niJfSEnyg-o


and Ryan Roye's video >
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAiBHjCS9Qk

JonW
01-29-2015, 08:53 PM
I had been fortunate to get away from all electronic devices for 6 months. Then had a small job to do on the computer for about 3 days & it was not urgent either so hours were reasonable.

After this I basically seized up for a few days, neck, shoulders, back & partly my arms were like a block of concrete. This situation really highlighted just how much damage we are doing to ourselves sitting in front of computers, & I was even getting up every hour to move & also walk each day.

Nicolas Jordan
04-04-2015, 02:31 PM
After a while using the 3M vertical mouse I started experiencing more pain in the shoulder area even though it did relieve wrist pain. I'm now considering trying a PenClic mouse http://www.penclic.se/penclic-mus/ to see if it is the cure I'm looking for.

magiclight
04-04-2015, 02:43 PM
I can NOT find a decent mouse, and I dont care for tablets. I have no idea why most mice all have the same overly narrow shape that forces your hand to scrunch in an unnatural position

The Logictech G602 is really nice to hold (but only forright handed of course), I got it because it has lots of buttons but I am very pleased with it, together with a mouse pad witgh wrist support it works good.

I have a Wacom Intuos 4 pro (the largest one), but I just use it with Manga Studio for now, I will try to get used to it with LW but I think it will take some time.

stargatesg1
04-04-2015, 03:13 PM
Totally agree! I was using tablet and pen back on my Apple 2GS "Kurta 12x12" if anyone remembers those.. Been using wacom tablets since.. and soon considering a Cintiq 27in pen/touch. Pricey.. but i guarantee less pricey then ending your career due to injury.

probiner
04-04-2015, 03:48 PM
I'm too young for this thread. Only wrist cramps I have while using the computer is from uninterrupted intense gaming or using the wacom extensively to paint (yeah for normal tasks it's great, but for actually painting for hours is stressful).

gerry_g
04-04-2015, 04:00 PM
hand is less strained more relaxed in upright pen holding position as with a tablet and there is no index finger ligament movement as you tend to activate the rocker with your thumb so the minute you switch to one the benefit is obvious, been using one for ten years for minimum of eight hours day and often longer and have no issues whatsoever with the wrist and hand, can understand why people are resistant to a tablet as they cost serious money and are harder to master at first, but in the long run they are way faster than a mouse. Can still be prone to neck or shoulder problems but people overlook the obvious, just a little well targeted exercise each day is all it takes, press ups are great, swimming butterfly style is perfect upper body workout or try something similar just standing up, and neck rotations help, in fact I had more pain in right hand when I drew with a pencil all day in my twenties than I ever do these days because they're thinner and you have to grip them tighter.

Nicolas Jordan
04-05-2015, 08:47 AM
Totally agree! I was using tablet and pen back on my Apple 2GS "Kurta 12x12" if anyone remembers those.. Been using wacom tablets since.. and soon considering a Cintiq 27in pen/touch. Pricey.. but i guarantee less pricey then ending your career due to injury. I'm also considering a Cintiq or soemthign similar as a possible long term solution after I have tried everything else. Many seem to think regular exercise is a large part of the solution so I think I will have to devise a regular upper body workout routine to see if that helps.

antsj
04-05-2015, 06:50 PM
Here is something that may help to add to your developing plans. Most people that develop pain may miss that it is the body's crude sensor for something is wrong. Wrist/Carpal pain from research back to 1990's found that causes were most often a failure of a person not taking microsecond’s muscle/tendon breaks.

A break is considered to consist of tense=active use and break=muscle relaxing. These tense-relax cycles were missing for those with muscle pain in wrist injury. Others in the posting are spot on with moving toward vertical mouse to help. Your shoulder pain could have to do with making the shift to the vertical mouse. I had a similar reaction and figure out I was over using the shoulder instead of letting the mouse pad support the wrist including retraining hand-wrist-forearm-to shoulder and neck.

Changing hands, moving to pen mouse and workouts will help. For others I have worked with wrist-arm-should-neck pain, they found relief from stretches (5-8 minutes learning but with short practice time moved down to 2-3 minutes three times during the work day helped to get relief. Biofeedback helped most to learn the difference between contract-relax cycle and coupled to learning to work with much less muscle overuse.

I hope you find what will get you relief.

aj

spherical
04-05-2015, 07:12 PM
True. When we use a pointing device, our muscles are always tensed; even just when not operating the device. We do this, so as to not interact with it. Much like stepper motors in a motion control system, we use as much or more energy maintaining a stationary position, as we do when in motion. The supporting structure needs to be in an energized state in order to provide a stable platform with which to maintain control over the outermost extremity.

The shift to a vertical mouse would, at least at first, lead to the upper arm/shoulder being tensed in order to keep the hand in its new position. Most times, this is unintentional and, when the mind is focused upon what is happening with the shoulder/arm/wrist/hand/fingers structure, much of it can be relaxed; but it takes conscious effort to develop these new and unfamiliar practices. Even when using a thumb trackball, I sometimes find that my shoulder is energized, when it doesn't need to be.

Nicolas Jordan
10-20-2015, 07:25 PM
I thought I would track down this old thread to give an update on my recent diagnosis. I have been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. It seems this may have been the cause of my troubles all along. For those who don't know rheumatoid arthritis is a autoimmune disease where the immune system can attack tendons and muscles in the joints causing plenty of pain and can eventually cause permanent damage. For anyone experiencing widespread tendon/muscle pain/tenderness on feet/hands/wrists/knees or shoulders especially if the pain is mirrored on both sides you may want to consider being checked for this. The earlier it's caught the faster it can be treated to help bring it under control. I'm still waiting to go to a specialist so my journey wit this has only just begun.

erikals
10-20-2015, 08:33 PM
outch :/

get better, maybe put a hot item on the arthritis. helped me many times.
worth a shot maybe...

Nicolas Jordan
10-20-2015, 09:26 PM
Yes I find both heat and ice works well to help relieve pain and inflamation. Just have to be careful not to move much after icing a joint for 10 minutes an let it thaw a bit. I never realized just how much I enjoy my work until health problems have limited the hours I can spend doing it.

ernpchan
10-20-2015, 09:39 PM
I know a lady who takes turmeric supplements for her RA. Not sure what the scientific data says but she says it helps.

sami
10-20-2015, 10:42 PM
I have been doing more work than usual at my computer over the last month and noticed pain beginning to develop in various parts of my hand and arm all the way into my shoulder. I guess this is what is referred to as repetitive stress injury which can lead to other potential problems as well.

I have done my own research and found a couple possible solutions. I have started using a Wacom Bamboo tablet to do my work but even after playing around with the settings I have found it hard to get used to. I heard about the ergonomic mouse from 3M seen here http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/904728P/3m-ergonomie-maus-em550gpl.jpg?boundedSize=310

I think I'm going to order one of these 3M mouses and give it a try although I read it does not have a scroll wheel.

Has anyone else experienced pain from using a standard mouse and what worked for you? Any other suggestions are welcome.

Not sure if these solutions have been mentioned, but a while back I had a big project which required a lot more work and much of it was precision mouse work sculpting and retopo and modelling and hours of it and within a week my wrist and hand was very screwed up - pain in the palm and wrist and forearm that tylenol didnt help with and I still had to finish the project! So I tried:

* one of the joystick mice you mentioned and it didnt help (nor was it easy to do modelling with) - no luck reducing pain - plus clumsy to use for precision work

* and then I tried one of those Evolution sideways mice which supposedly dont rotate your ulna so it's supposed to be more ergonomic - but no luck with this either (and it was pricy):
130450

* I tried regular gel wrist rests which also didn't work and were cumbersome

* I couldn't model or retopo with my wacom pen - I hate animating modelling w a pen - I only love it when painting or sculpting and need a brush

* but what finally worked was a combination of:

taking 1 evening completely off total rest
taping up my wrist with some tiger balm
getting one of these:
130451
http://www.amazon.com/Fellowes-Gliding-Microban-Protection-9180601/dp/B000XYQUT8/ref=sr_1_13?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1445400542&sr=1-13&keywords=fellowes

which supported my wrist well while moving the mouse and was WAY more frictionless!!
being sure my chair was high enough so my forearm was parallel to and at the height of my desk
and using that fellowes Gliding wrist rest with a much bigger mouse that fit my hand better (a Logitech MX Revolution mouse:
130452
- which has the BEST scroll wheel btw) as I found it wasn't clicking or moving the mouse as much as it was pinching my hand to grip the smaller mouse or hold it steady for precision point work with repetitive short drags which was killing me



After that I never had hand or wrist pain again! ... well except for the time I played Injustice Gods Among Us on tablet tapping and swiping in all directions all weekend like a maniac just to win more gold and buy better characters - but that was really more rotator cuff shoulder issue... and the cure for that was Don't be Green Lantern ;)

hope any of this helps!! :)

sami
10-20-2015, 10:50 PM
I guess putting the mouse at the correct reach and height is supposed to help. I also read that mousing from the elbow more instead of the wrist is also supposed to help but I find making accurate/small movements using the elbow to be more difficult.


yes - that low friction pad really helps for accurate movements with less effort!

to see how much you put your wrists through, use something like this which will generate a heat map image of all your mouse movements and pauses and tell you how many Km your hand has travelled in a single work day:
http://iographica.com/

sami
10-20-2015, 10:55 PM
I have thought about making some kind of tilting mousing surface to untwist my forearm similar to what you described you have done for your trackball.

The evolution was junk in my opinion and i ended up reselling it on ebay - my forearm was supposedly untwisted but it didnt help - besides, that sideways evolution mouse was pretty low dpi - I think it's for senior citizens using MS Office

sami
10-20-2015, 11:04 PM
oops just realized this is an old thread and you found the cause.

What ernpchan said is right - turmeric can help as well as anything to reduce inflammation and the c-reactive protein marker which is often indicative of inflammation.

good luck I hope you find some relief - also what someone said here about even microsecond breaks during precision work i spot-on - also so is the person who said pinching (or stabilizing) a smaller mouse scrunches your palm in unnatural ways which adds up to exacerbate any issue like the arthritis. take care!

Nicolas Jordan
10-21-2015, 11:09 AM
Thanks for the turmeric suggestion guys, I will look into it. I will also be looking into treatments and diet changes in order to slow the disease so I can continue working for as long as I can. I'm 35 at the moment so I hope I'm able to continue to do 3d work for at least another 5-10 years or longer if possible.

lightscape
10-21-2015, 11:13 AM
Boil some ginger and drink it like tea everday.
Artists should really exercise more.

Oedo 808
10-21-2015, 12:53 PM
Best invention for preventing wrist strain:

http://forums.newtek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=130474&d=1445453556

130474

zogthedoomed
08-24-2016, 12:14 PM
Another vote for a Wacom Intuos Pro. Been using a tablet for Lightwave and most other things for a couple of decades now. Only use a mouse for games and some Unreal editing stuff (the wheel makes some things easier). A few times when upgrades have caused paused in my wacom use I've gone back to a mouse but it feels like modelling with a brick.

Don't get a bamboo or any other small one as they're just too hard to use on a big monitor. Minimum should be a 6x8. The older versions made for widescreen are quite good though you'd have to find one on eBay.


edit: damn .. replied to a centuries old post .. .

erikals
08-28-2016, 11:13 AM
had to go back to the Chinese Hammer today...
http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?145276-Best-solution-for-wrist-arm-pain-from-using-mouse&p=1418584&viewfull=1#post1418584

cove
09-01-2016, 01:20 PM
I already had a problem with my forearms. Get a kind of fatigue feeling if my arm[s] are stationary for more than a few seconds.
A simple movement of my arm was all it took to relieve the fatigue feeling.
When i started to use my computer a lot more like all day every day
[Im retired now] i soon began to get small pains in my hands.
I realised what this was and gave it some thought as to how i can stop these pains accuring.
At the time i was using a medium sized mouse and a standard mouse mat.
Given that im pushing a mouse round all day long i dertermined that i need the smallest lightest mouse i could find [less weight to push around] and
that i find a surface that the mouse would run more smoothly on [Less resistance].
I ended up with a small cheap Logitec M100 mouse and found that an ordinary sheet of A4 office paper provided a noticibly smoother surface than the mouse mat.
These 2 combined resolved the issue i had with my hands.
I had this problem about 3 years ago and all is still ok.

As far as another poster saying that a very small mouse requires you to sort of over grip the mouse.
I agree with what he is saying but my way around that is to only
grip the mouse lightly with the thumb and ring finger. You would be suprised how quickly you get used to this more relaxed way of using your mouse.

spherical
09-01-2016, 09:20 PM
That which you really would benefit from is a trackball. Zero movement, no mass to push, stationary on the desk; therefore requiring less space. My Logitech operates with my thumb, has five buttons and a wheel for zooming.